Category Archives: Swimming Weimaraners

Water Weims

Webbed Toes

Crane's Lucy911

The Weimaraner is a powerful swimmer once they get going. The trick is getting to take the first step. Their toes are webbed making them better equipped to paddle.

There is no one way to get them to swim; however, we find having a love of the retrieve ingrained goes a long way towards accomplishing this discipline. (Sorry to some of you!) For the non-hunter, many times the retrieve is not an important thing. They allow their Weimaraner to abscond and run around the yard with the toy or the bumper. Yes, this is a hoot–although it is just one more Weim antic, this is one we suggest you not allow to take root.

The Recall

You want the Weimaraner coming when called. The Recall is a safety issue and the underpinning of compliance. Two areas where compromise cannot be allowed (in our opinion). Depending upon your approach to training there are various ways to get this done–we will forgo the discussion on methodology. Let’s just say get this done!

Early On

When you first bring your puppy home, there is so much going on, and the atmosphere is ethereal. It is hard to stay focused or to decide what is most important. Housebreaking and crate training is at the top of the list; however, a little retrieving work is a smart investment.

Cliff suggests you find a place to do this exercise. One place that works well is a hallway. Close all the adjoining doors (so they cannot take off with the bumper of the toy). Make this a special event and stop before they tire–while they are still begging for more. He also suggests you use a dedicated toy or bumper you save for this activity only. Depending on your pup’s attention and skill level keep the number of reps down–at first maybe as few as three. Bear in mind; the idea is to make this celebratory and fun. You want them having the desire. This activity will serve you well on so many levels and enhance your training outcome positively.

Water Exposure

Weather Permitting the OwyheeStar puppy will see the water before they depart. Nevertheless, this is not going to ensure they will swim. It will still require time, effort, and patience to get your Weimaraner to swim most of the time. A few suddenly jump in but don’t expect it to happen that way.

With the solid retrieve, you can begin working along the edges of a pond and very slowly ease them into the water beyond their comfort. It might take a few tries, a few days, or a few weeks. It takes as long as it takes, but if you follow this protocol, you will achieve the goal. Like anything with the concrete thinking Weimaraner, you want to make this part of the early life training. Then it becomes the norm.

Imagine the possibilities!

Crane's Lucy 957

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Weim

Crane Family954

Update on Lucy

At first we were scared that she may not like the water, which would be rough since we spend a LOT of time boating and playing at the lake, BUT a couple of weekends ago, my brother’s lab, Harken, taught Lucy how to fetch sticks in the lake and ever since, she LOVES to swim and  is faster than he is! Thank goodness we have a swimmer! And thank goodness for playful friends who help us grow!

Crane's Lucy923
Max, being 14 just chills and waits for Kisses from that crazy little Lucy.

She’s so good at paddle boarding, canoeing, boating, swimming, hiking and, when its all done for the day, cuddling isn’t a problem either!!

Breeder Comment

You were fortunate that she took up the water retrieve with Harken’s leadership. Some Weimaraners (who will remain nameless here) have been a challenge to get into the water. They will let the experienced Weimaraner do the work. Silly Weims.
There has never been an OwyheeStar Weimaraner that Cliff worked with that didn’t swim. Some loved the water more than others. The biggest obstacle he has with water work and hunt tests is getting the young Weimaraner to enter the water on command without the aide of a dummy.  Nevertheless, they all swim for him and even water retrieve.

Adventures

With Tripp

Companion Weims are the best! We can agree on that can we not?

20638342_10155222514939219_5106461485182600609_n

Rachel says, Tripp is amazing, I am so thankful to have him in my life! As you can see, he shares life with me on every level.

Tripp is such a great travel companion and water buddy. Lol as soon as I put my paddle board in the water Tripp jumps right on and is ready to go! Once we’re out in the water he feels so comfortable he gets up walks around, hangs out on the back of the board for awhile and then comes back up to the front and lays down! He’s amazing and I’m very lucky to have e him!

Thank you for Tripp! He truly is an amazing dog, he has so much personality and has adapted to my lifestyle for sure! He loves the outdoors and I’m so happy he loves the water as much as I do!

(lol) I still remember you (Shela) laughing at me through an email that I bought him a life jacket! You were absolutely right, he’s an amazing swimmer! (Lol, again) he swims better than I do and faster too!

I wish you could see him on the paddle board, he’s so good and I don’t even have to encourage him to get on the board, as soon as I put the paddle board in the water he runs over and jumps on, ready to go!

Breeder Comment

Tripp was rehomed with Rachel when his original family suffered a brutal loss during the last economic downturn. They lost their home and were struggling on every level. It was heartbreaking, but they felt finding him another family was in his best interest. We could not have gotten more fortunate for him.

Tripp is a companion Weimaraner sharing life on every level with his Mama. He is the best kind of friend–one who keeps all the secrets, keeps up with you, and celebrates everything you do together.

At Lake Michigan

The Water Retrieve Heerman's Ringo Summer 2017 C

 

Heerman's Ringo Summer 2017 dRingo loves Lake Michigan this summer (and Oakie still does too)!

Abbey Comments on Ringo’s Tail

We love it, and it’s never been an issue or gotten in the way. He gives us great big wags every time we get home. Oakie has a short tail, and it startles us every time we visit.

Breeder Comment

 

20431417_10210637774321588_7637926267290825980_n

Oakie

Swimming is an excellent summer activity. It is cooling but also great exercise as well as being easy on the joints. You might notice that Ringo sports the undocked tail. Nick and Abbey requested the undocked tail. Oakley is Nick’s parent’s Weimaraner, and he has the traditional docked tail. They didn’t get him from us, so that is about all I know about him.

For those just took home a Mesquite X Stackhouse puppy, Ringo is from a previous litter born to the same parents. The undocked tail preference upsets a lot of people. Others feel you should be allowed to have a tail undocked by choice. In many countries, tail docking and ear-cropping are either illegal or discouraged. Personal preferences run deep.

 

 

Meanwhile

In Alaska

      ~introduced Sage to the kayak

 

Sage loves the boat and her cuddles

Quinn's Sage Plus2The dogs just love going on boat rides and they both like to have their own seat. As for sage cuddles, I guess she just needed some extra attention. She does not know what to think about the kayak yet.

Quinn's Sage Summer 20171

Breeder Comment

Life in Alaska is good for Sage–she loves the snow as well as her water sports. The Kayak is new; however, we are confident with the consistent exposure she can come to love the experience. It warms our heart to know she is doing so well and is much-loved. Thank you, both for the lovely update–the videos and photos are excellent.

Getting the Hang of It

Stella Swims!

          Before The Swim

Here are three pictures before the swimming part happened.  My daughter, Libby, threw the ball and not one of the three dogs (she has two-Merle, a black lab, and Millie, a Burmese mountain dog) would go get it.   Merle loves sticks and doesn’t really care about balls.  Millie is eight and she just thinks water is not that great.  Only Stella would consider saving her orange ball.  It was so hilarious!  Eventually, she did it!

I thought I’d pass along two videos.  Video_1 is her first moment of realizing that she can swim and the Video is actually the next day when she’s got it down pat and we are in a different part of Bend.

Then This Happened!

We are really lucky to live in a place that is very welcoming to dogs.  We have lots of trails and water areas that she’s been experiencing.   I love the persistence Stella shows in video_1 where you can almost see her thinking, I can do this!  We love our sweet girl.

Have a great week!  ❤️ jill

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Jill, for sharing Stella’s adventure in water retrieval. It is an amazing couple of captures.

Dutch

DutchnMolly[1]

Dutch and Molly (my Grandmother’s OwyheeStar Weimar)

This is our Dutch dog. From the very beginning, you could tell he was going to be a great hunter. But to tell you the truth he’s always going to be my kid. When he was just a babe I started him out young training him with pheasant wings and of course ‘the ball.’ Dutch wouldn’t stop..and in his training he became great.
I decided about three years ago to teach him how to swim. ( Oh, he was 2 years old when he first swam.  ) Mind you he always liked the water. Short hairs usually don’t like the water but he’s a mix* because his Dad is a Longhair. I’d thought I’d risk it. We live on some pretty big water in Boring, Oregon along the Sandy River. The day was hot and water just right. I started him off slow throwing him a stick a little farther each time. After a few trial by error and gulps of water Dutch learned to raise his head and use that long whipping tail as a rudder. By that rate I couldn’t stop him from taking the plunge, jumping in and swimming against the strong currents. Dutch is unstoppable. Thank you, soo much for the joy you’ve brought into our lives. He’s really such a great dog!  😘 ~ Bonney

From Bonney’s Mom–Jane

Dutch has been the best of all the Weimaraners that we have owned.  Some of that may be due to our own growth in how to train a hunting dog, but most of it has to do with his personality.
He plays alone with a stick ball or blanket…throwing it up into the air and pouncing on it, tossing it and chasing it on his own while he spins, jumps and prances.
He plays well with other dogs, too and will lower himself to their level if they are small breeds.
Of course, we treat him like a human member of our family, but he has his own dog bed and toys.  Bonney has assisted greatly in his training to hold or stay.  He will allow Sam to walk around the area while he is on point (hold) and Dutch loves to dive into the brush to retrieve.  He does not like to come back empty handed.  He has also been swimming in the Colorado River and loves the water.
Mom’s dog, Molly, was born about 12 days after Dutch.  Mom and Bonney keep me up to date!

Breeder Comment

We are thrilled to get news for both Molly and Dutch. It is so great that they are doing well. Bonney, we thank you for the lovely video of Dutch swimming. 
*Bonney says he is a Mix–she means that Mama (Cindee) was a traditional Silver Gray smooth coat Weimaraner, whereas the litter was sired by Stackhouse who is a Longhair Weimaraner. Although a great percentage of the OwyheeStar pups learn to love the water, Stackhouse most certainly is a strong swimmer. Nevertheless, most Weims swim because a few things happen in the right way. One thing that really helps is getting the strong recall and the love of the retrieve ingrained. This strategy can work in your favor. Some folks who do not want a bird dog allow their Weimaraner too much freedom–they get the idea they can play keep away. They do not retrieve to hand. Achieving these two necessary skills opens additional doors of opportunity for the hunter and the non-hunter. It is important. Believing it is possible also is key. Getting the Weimaraner to swim is doable! Even in the most reluctant of swimmers, it can be achieved, but exposing them to water early on is best. 
Our puppies swim before leaving here when the weather permits. See the first swim of 2017 below.

At OwyheeStar Earlier This Year

The Sadie X Stackhouse Litter

Not Expected

Longhair’s Tail Fluff

        ~ Weim Tales

 

Heerman's Two on the bed

Skeeter Valentine and her Longhair brother Virgil

Virgil got a sticky fly trap thingy stuck on the last 1/5th of his beautiful, gorgeous, lovely tail!!!! What the Whaaaat. He was wagging the thing so much that it swung around where it had no business being and bam! Fly strip on the tail. First I have to say it’s not easy trying to get a weim to stay put. 

First I have to say it’s not easy trying to get a Weim to stay put when something like that happens, however, I did and was able to remove said fly strip. Washed tail to no avail. Had to trim some. The question is will it fill back in? I feel like I should know this but I do not.

Breeder Comment

Yes, Kaliece, the tail will grow back entirely. It might take months but the Weimaraner sheds hair (even the smooth coat), and new hair comes in from the follicle. During the first couple of years, the feathering fills in and for those that love the look–the tail becomes a beautiful flag.

We knew a person who used to shave their Longhair Weimaraners during the summer. Their coat came back full and lush, but they were cooler during the heat of the summer. We often clip the tail a bit (on the underside) before they whelp. This trimming process saves a lot of mess because there is a considerable amount of blood and ewe during the whelp. You don’t want this flipped all over the walls etc. It always grows back. So, for all you who are concerned about losing a little fluff–now you know. It will grow back. Some folks also groom the toe hair during the muddy season. They just have a groomer remove it. The toe tassels always come back. If you ever are worried, just clip a spot that is not noticeable and document it with a photo. Look at it over time.

As difficult as it might be to accomplish, rubbing peanut butter in something sticky like gum will dissolve it. This tip that might save needing to cut chunks of hair.

        ~ Swimming is Exhausting

We love him so much. Such a sweet boy. He is now LOVING to go swimming and he loves running with me. He is training up very well for that, he runs by my side nicely. He is fearless and very protective of me so I’ve really had to work on him relaxing on that aspect. I love knowing he’s watching out for me and he’s learning to watch my cues for leave it and quiet and learning to trust me and where I put him as much as I’m learning to trust his judgment as well. I don know if you know but he is my first male dog ever. So, Thank you for sending me such a nice boy. Just he needs to hush when asked and that is progressing very well. Thanks again for another great OwhyheeStar companion.

 Breeder Comment

This breed is different from other breeds in many ways. Many people who decide to get their first Weimaraner end up with a male. They might have wanted a female, but possibly there were none available. It is then they discover the truth–the boys are very sweet. Oh, they can be headstrong. The females can be tough to manage too! Regardless, they have a quality that catches a lot of folks off guard. It is not something you can put into words; however, in many cases, the way they bond to you wins you over. After being forced to get a first-time male dog, many end up having the male Weimaraner preference.

We have talked a lot about the difference between the male and female. Of course, there are exceptions. Regardless, in many cases, the female Weimaraner tends to be less engaged in their owner’s agenda and to value less the desire to please. (They can be such a prima donna). While all Weims can be manipulative, the female takes it to a new level. This trait can manifest in many different ways, and much of what happens depends upon their human and the relationship. Yes, it depends on the type of leadership role and your ability to evoke the desire to please you. How this expresses itself can vary. Each time it is a bit unique, and at the same time, it always sports a lot of the similar expression.

Just for Reference

Max Summer 2014-3

Some Weimaraner tails are fuller than others. Here is a photo of Max (at five) showing his beautiful plumage. Max Summer 2014-6

The Eleventh Hour Scenario

Happy May Day!

We are saying goodbye to the April Showers and the fickle weather, right? Most of us are hoping we have seen the last of the snow and some relief from the pounding rain. Who can guess? In reality, as we move through life we learn there are many unknowns. There is no way to plan for every unfortunate situation.

IMG_0553OwyheeStar received notice that Puppy #5’s family has such a situation and they cannot bring him home. It was an eleventh-hour notice. That is never a good thing for us or the pup. So we say May Day-May Day-May Day. Is there anyone who contacted us before about a Longhair or that has been secretly hoping for one that is ready? Cliff is meeting two families with their pups on this coming Friday in Burns, OR.

Of course, he is an awesome little pup. He has a very good nose–would do well for the shed hunter, etc. Here is his first swim!

We are sending out a little May Day distress signal to you all. It would be ideal (for the puppy and our situation) if he found a home where he could join his family at the same time the other pups are leaving. Thank you, for your consideration.

 

May Day–May Day–May Day

It derives from the French ‘venez m’aider’, meaning ‘come help me’.

It is repeated 3 times ‘Mayday, Mayday, Mayday.’

“A Mayday situation is one in which a vessel, aircraft, vehicle, or person is in grave and imminent danger and requires immediate assistance. Examples of “grave and imminent danger” in which a Mayday call would be appropriate include fire, explosion or sinking.

Mayday calls can be made on any frequency, and when a Mayday call is made no other radio traffic is permitted except to assist in the emergency. A Mayday call may only be made when life or craft is in imminent danger of death or destruction.”
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mayday_(dis…

In aviation, in addition to fire, a ‘Mayday’ distress call could be used for engine failure, electrical failure, fuel starvation, disorientation, control failure, or any condition where the safety of the flight is in question.

Swimming Pups

The First Swim

I posted this video on Facebook yesterday. I never gave it much thought, but it deserves an explanation. There are six puppies; four are Longhairs. Of the six, five have the natural European-style tail–full length. This tail length is typical around the world for the Longhairs–and it is the Breed Standard. You may have noticed that the one Blue Ghost puppy has a full-length tail too. It was by request.

B-Sadie X Stackhouse 2017 Week Five Adventure-4.jpgThe traditional undocked puppy requires advance notice. We have a very specific protocol for this situation. I will forego the details here, other than to say we require a larger deposit for the obvious reasons. The number of inquiries regarding the undocked tail continues to increase each year.

Introducing Something New

The pups had never seen more than their water dish. Cliff set them in the water as gentle as possible. They all swam. The Weimaraner has webbed toes, and it should be noted that they are often excellent swimmers. When introducing them to water, it is important to be sure they don’t get spooked. Cliff uses lots of patience when he is working an older pup or an adult into the water. Obviously, you cannot carry them out into the water and then set them gently as Cliff did with the pups.

It is important not to spook them. The best technique is to engrain the love of the retrieve from and early age. This obsession with the retrieve works in your favor to get them into the water. A pond with sloping sides is ideal. First, get them retrieving along the water’s edge. Gradually you will ease them out where they must go beyond the bottom. This process could take a couple of days or weeks. With patience, any Weimaraner can learn to swim.

Here is Stackhouse

     ~ another Longhair

Keep In Mind

All Weimaraners have the potential to take to the water. It takes a bit of knack and patience. Our puppy imprinting does guarantee success–nor does it hurt the process. The retrieving and water-work sometimes get cast to the side during the flurry of early adjustment. There are so many things pulling at the process it is easy to forget a few. Socialization (a lot of touches in a safe way), exposure to noise, ingraining the love of the retrieve (not playing keep away) as well as engaging the pup with water are equally important. Balancing everything you are trying to accomplish–the basics we keep talking about and a lot more while doing it in the right manner is not a small task. It is important to spook them and create a fear of people, places, or situations. Some pups are more sensitive to stimuli, and others let it roll off their back. Approach the process with caution staying optimistic and upbeat. Small steps to success will get you results. Preconceived ideas should be shelved. See what you can become together.