Category Archives: OwyheeStar Weimaraner Puppy

Ollie

~Off to a Fabulous Start

Played with his duck for about an hour and fell asleep right on top of it. Such a beautiful dog, thank you so much! 

Breeder Comment

We spent the last three days meeting people with their pups. The homes we have for each pup are extraordinary–and we cannot wait to hear from each family as their journey unfolds. Oliver (AKA Ollie) isn’t looking back, he bonded to his people, and life is so exhausting as you can see.

Do You Want A Water Dog?

~We Imprint Our Weimaraner Pups Whenever Possible.

Although it is our practice to swim pups when possible–meaning the weather allows us to do so, it doesn’t guarantee your pup will be a natural swimmer. Nevertheless, we believe the puppy swim imprints the idea into their mind and spirit, but it often requires work to get an adult to swim. It may also require knack, patience, and a bit of savvy. Cliff suggests that you achieve two things that will help you facilitate the water retrieve.

  1. The Love of the Retrieve
  2. A reliable recall–where they bring the tossed bumper or toy back to you–and come when called without delay.

If you do these two things, you will have greater success across the board–obedience, compliance, and a happy, well-adjusted Weimaraner.

Sunday Faces

~Once Again, Just Puppy Faces For Sunday

Puppy Development

~ The Adult-Looking Nine-Month Old Weimaraner

IMG_4306

36 weeks (from AKC)

At 9 months, you’re probably starting to wonder when your puppy will be fully grown. Expect your adolescent puppy to continue to grow and develop emotionally for a little while longer, and keep up on your puppy’s training. Take a moment during training to reflect on what you might be doing to encourage some of your puppy’s bad habits and make a commitment to change your behavior.

Miles kissing

These comments are meant for puppies in general; however, they apply even more so for the Weimaraner puppy. Letting your 12-week old pup jump up is not a good idea. If you do, by the time they are 9-months-old, you have a bigger problem. Letting them bite your fingers–as a young pup, may well lead to mouthing issues as the Weimaraner matures. Some do this mouthing-thing for their entire life–and for their owner, it might not seem like a problem until they put their mouth on someone else–those teeth can easily tear a hole in a thin-skinned older adult, or alarm someone.

Baby’s First Week

Oh babies!  LOL  They are the cutest thing in the world and a reminder that everything has to be explored and possibly tasted.  I clearly had forgotten this stage: we are making 20 trips outside a day, praising every outside potty, and the only accidents have been me not getting her downstairs fast enough in the morning and twice in her kennel when i was at work.  Can’t take my eyes off her in the house.  Oops, move that cord.  Oh, better put those books up higher.  What’s in your mouth?  She loves the bark chips that surround her new kingdom, it is loaded with baby size sticks.  


She has met her first new friend, played chase, found toys to last a lifetime (some new, some hand-me-downs), gone on a couple short walks, and loves just surveying the yard. Her Whistle device that tracks her movements and also has full GPS tracking should she ever get loose (not likely by any stretch!) is now on a smaller collar and her little walking harness should last several months.  She is about 17 lbs of almost pure love – i think a couple of those pounds are razor blade crocodile teeth!! 


We are following Cliff’s suggestions to the tee and she is eating three times a day.  She loves the puppy food.  NuVet supplements, check.  She is starting to respond to her name, but not consistently.  She likes going upstairs, but I have yet to entice her to come down on her own.  I have some friends nearby with an aging dog and a one year old that might take Franny one day a week while I am at work – one of the adults in the house is retired and home all day.  


So – the updates from our first few days are great.  I will probably be exhausted before we leave potty training stage, but it goes by fast enough, i will miss this little snuggle face as she gets bigger.  🙂
If you want to use for the blog – feel free – edit as you like.  I mostly wanted to let you know all is well out here in Hillsboro!! I am thinking about the whole naming thing now.  Not sure yet what I want her to be “officially”. 

I hope you are well.  K Marie and Franny

Breeder Comment

We are happy that you could bring her home–we had the Longhairs that were not yet promised. She is a lovely girl–but a baby as you say. Thanks for the update.

Puppy Faces

Spring Pups 2020

7 Steps To Success

Note: This is a repost of an article we have shared several times. Our pups are ready to acclimate to their new environment upon arrival. We recommend not over-thinking at the early stages.

  1. Be committed — Commitment to the process is primary. Training your pup will take time. Think of this as a journey (a road trip) with a destination in mind. Don’t set timelines; instead, take this adventure together. It will take as long as it takes for each achievement. Sometimes just when you think, you have arrived; your Weimaraner will hit a snag or transitional phase. There are many of these stages in the first couple of years. As with an adolescent, they can be going along well and suddenly regress. Please take this in stride it is nothing personal. The first occurrence could well be prior to week twelve. Stay calm and move ahead–this is how to avoid ingraining fear or some unwanted behavior.
  2. Keep your eye on the young puppy at all times—This is vitally important for at least the first 2-3 weeks, or until you have the housebreaking part accomplished. Use a crate, bag, or soft-side crate to confine the pup when you cannot be vigilant. The crate should not be too large. If it is more than they need they may select one end for a potty area.
  3. Be consistent–Do everything in the same manner! For example, the pup wakes up and stirs. At first, you would pick them up and carry them out to the area where you want them to go potty. Each time you see them circling or rousing from a nap go to the potty-area. If you use the bells hung at the door, then ring them as you go out the door. Soon they will be ringing the bells as a signal for you to open the door.
  4. Keep it simple — Although your pup can learn amazing things, it is best to do a few simple things and build upon those experiences. The process will unfold naturally if you allow it to do so; start with getting them to come. Although they all follow and come to us, it is different once they start to mature. Do the hallway exercise (5-7 retrieves each night). By using a hallway (with adjoining doors closed) there is nowhere for them to escape with the toy, ball, or dummy. Some people treat them when they bring the item to their hand. It is not necessary. The activity is a reward in and of itself. Have a couple of bumpers or toys (designated for this activity). Make it an event every day until you move to the yard because you have compliance.
  5. Keep it fun — Weimaraners are brilliant and learn quickly. A trainer might tell you to work for an hour and even a half hour doing one exercise every night, but we suggest ten minutes. Do it for ten minutes and then do something fun. This approach works for us! If your Weim pup loses interest, you lose ground in the training process.
  6. Remember it is about your relationship — No matter what you are doing it is important to remember that Weims are all about relationship. If they get their feelings hurt, things can go sour quickly. Your bonding experience is vital to the success of this relationship. Take time to think and see things from their perspective. You are the center of their world. They not only want to control you, but they want to own you. Weimaraners are the ultimate Velcro dog and must learn how to stay alone. Your relationship is a double-edged sword. They need a lot of time, attention, and affection. They also need to find ways to cope when you are absent. We recommend starting this process very early, or they will come to expect you will be there 24 X 7. Separation anxiety can be a huge issue in this breed.
  7. Be patient — When you go out to teach your pup a skill, make sure it is a learn-able task. Plan enough time to accomplish the task–but keep your training focused to ten to twenty minutes maximum. The short bursts of success are more effective than lengthy sessions. Your attitude and demeanor play into the equation too! If you are feeling stressed, forego training your Weimaraner. There are many methods of training. Nevertheless, choose one that enhances your bonding experience and one that creates a respectful environment for all concerned.

The best Weimaraner people are those that are natural leaders. Anytime you feel your relationship is stressed then you are going down the wrong road. The persons that are neither too strict nor too lenient are usually, the ones that excel. Regardless of what happens, it is always best to pro-active than to be reactive. Stay calm. Keep it simple. Get results. Plan little steps of learning and build upon them. Try our 7 steps to Success, and we believe you will be on the right path.

Wishing you fewer puppy bites and more puppy kisses

~ Shela and Cliff

Rayne

~ In Time Gunner will love her too!

Gunner says, “Tell me again why we need her.”

Just wanted to send you a little note.  We made safe travels home, way easier than the drive to Pendleton.   We decided to name our little girl Rayne.  She has been an absolute joy since we picked her up. 

Gunner, our 2 year old blue Weimaraner,  isn’t too fond of the little lady yet.  He had temper tantrums all the way home, even refused to sit next to her in the truck.  He’s receiving extra love and attention so he knows he’s still very much loved.  His feelings about her are improving,  but still needs some work.  We absolutely love both of these dogs.  Thank you.
Cindy, Kevin, and family.

Breeder Comment

Poor Gunner, his world is turned upside down. You did right, bringing him along. Can you imagine had you shown up after being gone with her in your arms? It would not have gone well. He will soon come to the realization she is part of the family, and I suspect he will take up with her. They may even conspire together in mischievous deeds–just saying.

Behind the Scenes

Christina and Babe

Before the pups arrive, the Mamas have our full attention–we work to ensure they eat well. We watch for any sign of a problem, etc. The whelp-window is typically from day 59 to day 64. The pups must be at least 59 days old to survive–although we might use extraordinary measures to save a puppy–there are limitations.

Once the pups are here, Christina and I do most of the hands-on work. We do like to involve Cliff when possible–a man’s touch is a good thing. Some pups require a lot more than others–case in point, Dink. You might remember the tiny undersized puppy which Christina took to feeding and caring for around the clock. Sometimes intervention doesn’t work–because there is something wrong. Other times such a pup starts to thrive and eventually catches up with their litter.

Day One Photo

From Day-One, there is a lot of hands-on work. Thankfully, Christina is a skilled puppy handler-whisperer sort of helper. Recently, she whelped a pup when we had to be away from the house. She has an eye for details–watching and looking the puppies over constantly while she adjusts their collars, handles them, and works with each one. As you might imagine, this kind of process is labor-intensive–but we believe it works–is essential.

There are many stages and steps involved in the raising of the Weimaraner. We hope to have them set up for success–but once they transition to their ‘forever family,’ the work continues. No matter our efforts, it is almost as if you are starting from scratch–it is a new environment. They have to adjust and adapt, which they will do very quickly, and at the same time, the humans must take control of the leadership role, or the puppy will rule the house in short order.

Merry Christmas

~ From all of us at OwyheeStar

This photo was not taken all that long ago–myself with Christina, our current puppy handler girl. She is doing such an excellent job–and seriously, she saved our life when Cliff was hospitalized.

She did things she never imagined possible–including whelping a puppy when we were gone.

There have been more photos taken and processed this year than I can count–than you can imagine. Christina took nearly every picture except for these phone snapshots.

And, she hand-raised and save Dink–the undersized pup who was getting bumped off the teat. She slept with him in a Sherpa Bag on the bed–feeding him during the night as he needed. Yesterday, when Jacob was here for lunch–he had to have Dink-time. But of course, Christina had to have her extra time and get loves, too.

We rejoice in the miracle of Christmas –and all the miracles that we get to be a part of –where beautiful friendships develop. Thank you for being a part of our lives. Merry Christmas, Weimlovers!