Category Archives: House Training

Meanwhile

~In Idaho

Thought you might like a 12week (almost 13) update on our out Henry!


He’s amazing. He loves to play fetch and so good at the return. He is learning and listening so well. Still mastering the potty training, but great as long as we are paying attention! He’s such a funny pup and so smart! He is able to play hide and seek with toys and people. He’s catching on so we’ll to words we use. He is obedient to sit, stay, lay down, come and ‘outside’ (our word for potty!) He has even mastered wiping his feet when he comes back in, on the rug…. For a treat of course! He has grown SO much and going to need a bigger bed soon!


Sorry some of the pics are blurry! He’s not still for long! ~Jill and Clint

Breeder Comment

Hello There–we are so happy to hear from you. Just look at what is happening, you are doing great things. We cannot be happier to hear the news and to these photos. Thanks ever so much!

Every Breath You Take

~ Sounds Like

I often wonder how we do it. You know–raise a puppy. We bring the little bundle home and hover over them. It is essential to do the hovering thing–otherwise, how can you accomplish the housebreaking, etc.? But this obsession with our new fur baby runs deep–some of this never goes away.

Their every sound–a rattling, a snore, a hacking sound is cause for alarm. We watch breath-abated wondering if we need to run to the Vet. Ah–it is hard to know sometimes. We always suggest you wait and watch a bit–possibly take their temperature. Remember that a pet’s temperature is much higher than ours–typically around 101 degrees. Anything above 104 degrees is emergent. Of course, if you were monitoring their temperature and it was 102 degrees and then within an hour 103 degrees, there might be cause for alarm. Always err on the side of caution–but rushing to the Vet for everything is probably not necessary. In fact, your alarm will be internalized by the puppy increasing the stress-factor. Try to stay calm.

A lot–and I do mean a lot, of our concerns, are for nothing. Puppies can cough, they snort, the sneeze, they can reverse sneeze (something we recently learned), they choke, and create a myriad of noises. Many of which are concerning. Most of which are in the end nothing at all. Thank goodness.

Keep your eye on them. A pup can ingest something in quick order–so despite saying not to overreact, there is vigilance. Recently, Henri went under my recliner and came out with a packet –that must have been attached underneath the chair. We didn’t realize it was there, but Henri found two–probably toxic packets. Oh my gosh–it is good we heard the crackling sound and asked what she had. We retrieved each package and tossed them in the trash. Thankfully they were not broken open.

Lapdog

What Does Your Weim Do?

 

Ari the Lap Dog_4490018248684979043_n

Ari is a Lap Weim and  very clever at trying to run the show

 

 

We who love the breed know they are the ultimate velcro dog. This attribute can work against us; however, most Weimlovers are addicted to this trait. New to the Weimaraner–you might be shocked at a large breed being this clingy. They are also prone to separation anxiety.

How This Works

When present you are their security blanket. When their humans are absent, the unprepared Weimaraner may freak out. All too many have ended up in rescue or a shelter because unaware admirers acquired them only to discover they couldn’t live with them. Not understanding the separation anxiety lead to unearned freedom and coming home to destruction. It might be your favorite shoes. The sofa arm by the front window or the carpet might be the target of the Weim’s reaction to feeling abandoned. The arm-missing-castoff-sofas greet the unsuspecting returning owner. Most often the human counterpart is perplexed. They might have had a Weim before that didn’t behave like this; however, in this instance, something went awry. Your absence causes them to act out–typically chewing up something to relieve their stress. They fear you will not return to them. You forgot them. The amount of destruction can vary. Sometimes the Weimaraner can escape the environment and give chase looking for you–desperate to find you. The last scenario has ended in a loss more times than you can imagine.

Twists and Turns

 

Griffin's Zeus and Ari Mess

Ari and Zeus made this mess for fun

Separation anxiety can take other forms. Some Weims sulk and then chew because they are upset with you. Nevertheless, they might withhold their love and refuse to even look at you. When your response is heartbrokenness and trying to win back their affection, they have the upper paw. Now, they can expand their toolbox with extreme manipulation. So, they can chew to relieve stress. They can chew because it has become a habit. They can chew to punish you. For those who are less committed, you can see how this can spin out of control.

 

Spiraling Out of Control

When coupled with incessant barking (and your neighbors are reporting you to the police) the destructive Weimaraner soon becomes abhorrent. People imagine that they would never dump their Weim at a shelter. Unfortunately, it happens too often. Therefore, our application process looks to discover the potential for failure with the breed as well as to gather the vital information necessary. Someone who is offended by us wanting the information may look elsewhere for their Weimaraner. It has to be that way. There are too many ways things can go awry–even for the most dog savvy person.

 

 

Berkley

Off to A Good Start

We love our Berkley. You chose well!!

Peck's Berkley-9374

Here’s an update on CRATE TRAINING:

She was totally content in her crate for the 4-hour ride home from Oregon. We stopped once and she went potty. Her first night home, she was not happy at all to be away from her litter mates and her mama. We put her crate in our room so she could see us, but she still howled and whined much of the night. Yesterday we put her in her crate several times, for 20-45 minutes each time, during the day while we ate our meals and ran an errand. She was a little vocal about it each time but got better as the day progressed. We hosted a lunch event and a dinner event, and she did splendid meeting and greeting all the shoe-less guests (parvo precautionary rule). She was the absolute center of attention for a good chunk of the day. When it was time for bed last night we put her in her crate and she went right to sleep. Not one howl or yelp! She stirred at 2 am and gave me a little whimper. I took her outside and she went potty right away. She went back to sleep in her crate until almost 6 am, which is my wake-up time anyway! We were so thrilled and gave her lots of praise for doing such a good job.

An update on POTTY TRAINING:

We used the bell method with our first Weim, and it worked like a champ. So we knew this was the way to go the second time around. Every time we take her outside to go potty (after she eats, wakes up, just before bed or crate time, or every 30 minutes or so), we take her little paws and ring that bell and say “outside”. Yesterday she rang the bell all on her own. We took her out and she went potty right away. Then again today, she rang the bell on her own, and the same thing happened!!! She is catching on so fast. We haven’t had to clean up after any accidents. I am shocked.

An update on TRAINING AND LIFE IN GENERAL:

She is retrieving like a champ to our hand….stuffed toys, mostly. She isn’t into the balls yet for some reason. She is coming on command and just starting to get “sit”. I started working with her on heeling as well, but that’s a little trickier. She is starting to get it, but barely. Berkley went with us to take big sister to school for her first day of school today. And then she snuggled on the couch with us and listened in as I read a Sofia the First story to our youngest. She’s one fun pup. I attached a few pictures.

Thanks so much, Amanda

Breeder Comment

It was very sweet of you to update us on Berkley. We appreciate the follow through you are doing too! It is paying off. Yes, we try to set the pups up for success, but it takes more than a little knack to step quickly toward success.

The potty training is excellent. I love that you used the bell system. Around here that would not work, but in a traditional family setting it can get you off to a good start fast. Be sure to get a fecal exam. Giardia and coccidia are common one-celled parasites that can quickly multiply and reek havoc on the pup’s intestine. Treatment isn’t a big deal if you catch it early. Pups prefer puddle water, and they also lick their feet all the time. These are great ways to ingest something that can take off like a wildfire.

For those that have never collected a sample–you invert a baggie (Mark your name on this baggie first to ensure it is labeled). Grab a portion of a suspicious looking sample and invert and seal the baggie. Label a second baggie with your name, the pup’s name as well as the date and time the sample was collected. Keep this sample cool (not frozen). Freshness is important; therefore, get the collected sample to the Vet office ASAP. Collect it just before you leave when possible.

This one thing can save you a lot of trouble. Stress diarrhea is a thing. We might fear the worst, and it could be stress. Canned or steamed pumpkin is great for correcting a loose stool. It is not a bad idea to give your pup a couple of tablespoons twice a day and even some berry yogurt–the kind with live cultures. These are very good for their digestion, and the yogurt helps ward off yeast infections too.

Waylon

Off To A Good Start

17192077_10210819050745348_7420979322273107579_oIt’s hard not to brag how good he’s doing!  Sleeping pretty much through the night ( sometimes needs out once). He’s a chewer but sticks to his toys.  He loves attention but isn’t whining at all when he goes in the crate ( I’ve been doing random times for an hour or so when I’m home so he isn’t anxious when he does have to be left). He plays a few hours and sleeps a few hours.  He goes into his crate and sleeps on his own. And also goes into the living room to sleep on his bed. Needy but not anxious to be apart.

He has the calmest yet playful personality!!
Hope all is well with you and Cliff 🐾🐾🐾

~ Cristi (Bend, Or)

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Cristi, for thinking of us in the midst of raising the Weimaraner puppy. We are thrilled it is going well–stay the course, and let it unfold bit-bit-bit. You are doing perfectly. There will be ups as well as downs–these guys tend to test the boundaries as well as your authority as things move along. Your relationship is key to the success. Getting them to want to please you now will pay life-long dividends.

storm_5243

Stormy “So, you want a kiss?”

Waylon’s lineage is pretty amazing. It includes maternal Grandma Deli, Grandpa Zee as well as the infamous Stormy and Dusty on the paternal side. Dusty is the only living grandparent, but all the aforementioned Weims had more than decent longevity. Hollee was a late in life offspring for Miss Deli–a single pup litter (after many attempts in the hope of getting her. Almost every OwyheeStar pup is related to one or more of these foundational Weimaraners.

We sincerely hope Waylon lives long and continues to thrive. Again, we sincerely thank you, for this update. We know others appreciate reading it too!

From Central Oregon

Where do I begin?

          ~We are Living In Idaho!

We’ve moved to Middleton, and we have been here for over a month. I am finally settling in.This pup (Cooper) is full of energy, I’ve stopped trying to compare anything to Ada (my former Weimar). He’s his own beast.

The adjustment

He took to the crate with no problems. and I can now leave him out during the day (doggy door to go out) while I’m at work and there’s nothing out of place minus the random stick or rock he brings in. I’m pretty amazed honestly.

I’ve been working 15/20 min a day (well try to) with a bird wing. and he is taking to it and the training pretty well. I tell myself he’s still just a pup and try not to expect too much at the moment. My dad got a pup that’s just a few weeks older, and it’s been fun watching them develop.

Thank you for this crazy weim. And I’ll try to give you some future updates without as much time passing.

Breeder Comment

We are happy to hear that Cooper has made a good adjustment despite all the change that occurred. This move may work to his favor in the future. The more adaptable Weimaraner is the better-balanced adult. Thank you for the time and effort to send us the update.

Duke

Is Doing Great!

Schell's Duke at Home-3We are doing great, getting acquainted with our Duke and he is getting used to his new home and us.

He was very good for the ride home; I sat with him in the back and he slept the whole way home.

Schell's Duke at Home-2We brought him home and went to our yard first for him to potty and he did. We haven’t had an accident in the house (yay!).  He lets us know by sitting at the door when he’s ready to go out. He likes his crate and we have slowly been getting him used to that being his special spot. He whined for about 15 minutes the first night and then slept for about an hour. We took him out and put him in for a couple more hours (About 15 minutes of whimpering and howling. Then the next time we took him out to potty, we slept with him on the couch. We are trying to prolong his time in the crate each day as he gets more comfortable to his environment. 

Schell's Duke at HomeHe slept for a couple hours earlier today in his crate, shut during the afternoon while we were close by and he did a little whimper and then didn’t fuss. It was very good. We are going to see how tonight goes for a longer period in the crate.

We are learning he likes to chew and get his energy out, so those pig ears and small toy with his family’s scent on it have been big hits for him, as well as a big stuffed dinosaur which is comical to watch and these tall grass reeds in our yard.

We still have to work on his retrieve.

He is a big lovebug and definitely likes to be close to us. 🙂

Thanks for all your help and tips. I will keep you posted and feel free to check in as well.

One Month Henry

Time Flies

We have officially had Henry for a month now. He is busy for sure, but the things I worried about initially are becoming less of an issue every single day. Henry has improved by leaps and bounds as far as crating. He is still doing great at night, but during the day he has also improved. It seems like in just this last week he has begun to settle down very easy in his crate, and doesn’t even bark when we arrive back home after leaving him for some time. I think he is starting to understand that we really always will come back for him!!
While Henry absolutely loves his people time, he will go out in the back yard and be entertained with finding sticks for long periods of time alone. Although today her snuck under a fence and gave us a brief panic, he was patiently waiting at the front door for us to let him in. So no alone time until he is grown up enough to not fit under that fence. Stinker!!!
He had his second vet trip, he weighs 20 pounds and the vet increased his food from two cups per day, to two and a half cups per day.
Our biggest issue at the moment is his shark teeth nipping. It is worse for the kids because they are low to the ground and like to talk to him in high pitched voices that get him excited. They are starting to figure it out. Lol.
We still need to start puppy training, but his abilities at the point is sit, lay down, shake, wait (video included), he is still very good at loose leash walking, heeling, come is a challenge sometimes if he is distracted, so he half has that down.
I think he is doing amazing and for the most part is laid back. He gets excited initially with new company, but settles down quickly, especially when we have him on his leash.
Kiley (July 7, 2016)

Beginnings

George is Adjusting

June 11, 2016

Everything is going well.

George seems totally housebroken, the older dog is starting to tolerate him a little more and he’s adjusting happily to the house. He’s eating 3-5 cups a day ravenously and I can see him getting bigger by the day.

The Desire to Please

Looking forward to a couple weeks when he had enough stamina for some outings besides short walks. He’s also showing intense interest in leftover quail and ring-neck deaths I had in the freezer. He’s a sweet mellow dog and you were right- he shows real interest in trying to understand what I want him to do. I think he’s probably smart anyway but this motivation is really what’s making him so easy to train so far.

Breeder Comments

Cliff and I are happy to hear that George is adjusting and settling into your family–as well as the household routine. It is good that you have some birds to use between now and hunting season. He has an excellent nose and keeping the interest forefront is a good idea.

Gulping of Food

Gobble StopperWe believe it is in the best interest of the Weimaraner to encourage them to eat slower. Gulping their food can soon be a habit, and many believe this can lead to an episode of bloat.
Fun Feeder

The puppy stage is the time to implement measures that thwart gulping food. Many people have found the special bowls that require a pup to eat slower beneficial. Check out the bowl choices–click here! There are several styles (these are often called the slo-bowl), and people have written to us about having success using several variations. We feel it is worth checking out and considering.

7 Steps To Getting Off to a Good Start

~We recommend the simple approachBoot's Bentley-3

  1. Be committed — Commitment to the process is primary. Training your pup will take time. Think of this as a journey (a road trip) with a destination in mind. Don’t set timelines; instead, take this adventure together. It will take as long as it takes for each achievement. Sometimes just when you think, you have arrived; your Weimaraner will hit a snag or transitional phase. There are many of these stages in the first couple of years. As with an adolescent, they can be going along well and suddenly regress. Please take this in stride it is nothing personal. The first occurrence could well be prior to week twelve. Stay calm and move ahead–this is how to avoid ingraining fear or some unwanted behavior.
  2. Keep your eye on the young puppy at all times—This is vitally important for at least the first 2-3 weeks, or until you have the housebreaking part accomplished. Use a crate, bag, or soft-side crate to confine the pup when you cannot be vigilant. The crate should not be too large. If it is more than they need they may select one end for a potty area.
  3. Be consistent–Do everything in the same manner! For example, the pup wakes up and stirs. At first, you would pick them up and carry them out to the area where you want them to go potty. Each time you see them circling or rousing from a nap go to the potty-area. If you use the bells hung at the door, then ring them as you go out the door. Soon they will be ringing the bells as a signal for you to open the door.
  4. Keep it simple — Although your pup can learn amazing things, it is best to do a few simple things and build upon those experiences. The process will unfold naturally if you allow it to do so; start with getting them to come. Although they all follow and come to us, it is different once they start to mature. Do the hallway exercise (5-7 retrieves each night). By using a hallway (with adjoining doors closed) there is nowhere for them to escape with the toy, ball, or dummy. Some people treat them when they bring the item to their hand. It is not necessary. The activity is a reward in and of itself. Have a couple of bumpers or toys (designated for this activity). Make it an event every day until you move to the yard because you have compliance.
  5. Keep it fun — Weimaraners are brilliant and learn quickly. A trainer might tell you to work for an hour and even a half hour doing one exercise every night, but we suggest ten minutes. Do it for ten minutes and then do something fun. This approach works for us! If your Weim pup loses interest, you lose ground in the training process.
  6. Remember it is about your relationship — No matter what you are doing it is important to remember that Weims are all about relationship. If they get their feelings hurt, things can go sour quickly. Your bonding experience is vital to the success of this relationship. Take time to think and see things from their perspective. You are the center of their world. They not only want to control you, but they want to own you. Weimaraners are the ultimate Velcro dog and must learn how to stay alone. Your relationship is a double-edged sword. They need a lot of time, attention, and affection. They also need to find ways to cope when you are absent. We recommend starting this process very early, or they will come to expect you will be there 24 X 7. Separation anxiety can be a huge issue in this breed.
  7. Be patient — When you go out to teach your pup a skill, make sure it is a learn-able task. Plan enough time to accomplish the task–but keep your training focused to ten to twenty minutes maximum. The short bursts of success are more effective than lengthy sessions. Your attitude and demeanor play into the equation too! If you are feeling stressed, forego training your Weimaraner. There are many methods of training. Nevertheless, choose one that enhances your bonding experience and one that creates a respectful environment for all concerned.

The best Weimaraner people are those that are natural leaders. Anytime you feel your relationship is stressed then you are going down the wrong road. The persons that are neither too strict nor too lenient are usually, the ones that excel. Regardless of what happens, it is always best to pro-active than to be reactive. Stay calm. Keep it simple. Get results. Plan little steps of learning and build upon them. Try our 7 steps to Success, and we believe you will be on the right path.

Wishing you fewer puppy bites and more puppy kisses

~ Shela and Cliff