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Stella

Not Short on Adventures

      ~ Digging for Sportimage3

I think Stella’s about nine months old now and we just moved into our brand new, very own home!   That’s some good news.  The bad news is that we are working on our backyard.  Of course, Stella thinks it’s awesome because she has a lot of dirt to bury bones in. She is so silly and dirty.

Running Free and Swimming

Another piece of good news is that Stella’s been on lots of adventures with her dog pals!  Here are some pictures from our last trip up the Deschutes River.  There’s no bad news to that.  Stella runs free and happy through the woods and eagerly swims in the river!  She’s also ‘almost’ stopped jumping on all the people she meets.  Maybe that’s some bad news….

Snacking on the Stairsimage6

Anyway, the worst news is that on the day she was contained in our new dog run and had access to our garage in case of rain…. she opened (or we left open) the door to our new house. There were builders in the backyard putting up the new fence.  Anyway, long story short…SHE ATE A STAIR!  She’s never chewed anything!  Yikes!  I included a picture!

Looking Pretty or Contemplating her next Anticimage5

Anyhow, through that whole adventure, we love our beautiful girl still.  That’s the best news.  I attached a picture of her posing.  Or maybe, she was contemplating her next move!  Hahahahahaha.
That’s the scoop from our family!  We hope your family is doing well.
Jill, Timothy, and Stella
Oh, Shela!  Our daughter is enrolled at TVCC (Treasure Valley Community College0 there in Ontario and playing basketball.   She’s loving Ontario!  Hooray!  Go, Chukars!

Breeder Comment

Relocating a Weim can be laden with pitfalls. They don’t do change well, but it seems Stella is adapting well. The most significant concern may be that she is developing the habit of digging. The concrete-thinking Weimaraner is tough to retrain once they get the idea that something is the norm. (oops) This way of thinking can carry over into all areas. Well, such as chewing the stairs could transfer to fencing, etc.

It is outstanding that she is water-friendly–swims in the river. Jumping up on people she greets is not pleasant for those being welcomed; however, at least she is super friendly. We would Prepare these jumping-up issues rather than dealing with a Weimaraner that is not people-friendly. Thank you, for the great share. We truly appreciate it!

The Last for the Year

At the Nielsen Farm Pond

Atti X Boone Swim.jpgWe promised an OwyheeStar client who is getting one of the Atti X Boone pups that we could swim the pup before they depart. Any promise is subject to being derailed by circumstances beyond our control. Mr. Winter could push in and steal the stage. He has already made it evident that he is intent on an early arrival. We didn’t get snow; however, other not so far away places did–Cotton Mountain for one. The forecast has been for a warmer fall, and we hoped for the Indian Summer weather that we love so much.

The icy temperatures departed, and the pups came of age. Isn’t it grand when the stars align? The pond filled and despite the straw-like trim that floated around the edge it made for the perfect opportunity to get the swim accomplished. The last induction to water for the year. We don’t have access to an indoor swimming pool.

We love adding the puppy swim to the list of early life experiences. Nevertheless, many OwyheeStar Weims swim without the benefit of this imprint experience. Therefore, folks getting a winter pup should not fear their pup won’t take to the water. In fact, any Weimaraner can become an excellent swimmer. Some are more natural swimmers than others. It takes knack and patience. The right setting also helps you achieve the swim. A love of the retrieve is an invaluable tool. If you are patient and keep working on this discipline, we have no doubt you will achieve a positive outcome.

Water Weims

Webbed Toes

Crane's Lucy911

The Weimaraner is a powerful swimmer once they get going. The trick is getting to take the first step. Their toes are webbed making them better equipped to paddle.

There is no one way to get them to swim; however, we find having a love of the retrieve ingrained goes a long way towards accomplishing this discipline. (Sorry to some of you!) For the non-hunter, many times the retrieve is not an important thing. They allow their Weimaraner to abscond and run around the yard with the toy or the bumper. Yes, this is a hoot–although it is just one more Weim antic, this is one we suggest you not allow to take root.

The Recall

You want the Weimaraner coming when called. The Recall is a safety issue and the underpinning of compliance. Two areas where compromise cannot be allowed (in our opinion). Depending upon your approach to training there are various ways to get this done–we will forgo the discussion on methodology. Let’s just say get this done!

Early On

When you first bring your puppy home, there is so much going on, and the atmosphere is ethereal. It is hard to stay focused or to decide what is most important. Housebreaking and crate training is at the top of the list; however, a little retrieving work is a smart investment.

Cliff suggests you find a place to do this exercise. One place that works well is a hallway. Close all the adjoining doors (so they cannot take off with the bumper of the toy). Make this a special event and stop before they tire–while they are still begging for more. He also suggests you use a dedicated toy or bumper you save for this activity only. Depending on your pup’s attention and skill level keep the number of reps down–at first maybe as few as three. Bear in mind; the idea is to make this celebratory and fun. You want them having the desire. This activity will serve you well on so many levels and enhance your training outcome positively.

Water Exposure

Weather Permitting the OwyheeStar puppy will see the water before they depart. Nevertheless, this is not going to ensure they will swim. It will still require time, effort, and patience to get your Weimaraner to swim most of the time. A few suddenly jump in but don’t expect it to happen that way.

With the solid retrieve, you can begin working along the edges of a pond and very slowly ease them into the water beyond their comfort. It might take a few tries, a few days, or a few weeks. It takes as long as it takes, but if you follow this protocol, you will achieve the goal. Like anything with the concrete thinking Weimaraner, you want to make this part of the early life training. Then it becomes the norm.

Imagine the possibilities!

Crane's Lucy 957

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At Lake Michigan

The Water Retrieve Heerman's Ringo Summer 2017 C

 

Heerman's Ringo Summer 2017 dRingo loves Lake Michigan this summer (and Oakie still does too)!

Abbey Comments on Ringo’s Tail

We love it, and it’s never been an issue or gotten in the way. He gives us great big wags every time we get home. Oakie has a short tail, and it startles us every time we visit.

Breeder Comment

 

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Oakie

Swimming is an excellent summer activity. It is cooling but also great exercise as well as being easy on the joints. You might notice that Ringo sports the undocked tail. Nick and Abbey requested the undocked tail. Oakley is Nick’s parent’s Weimaraner, and he has the traditional docked tail. They didn’t get him from us, so that is about all I know about him.

For those just took home a Mesquite X Stackhouse puppy, Ringo is from a previous litter born to the same parents. The undocked tail preference upsets a lot of people. Others feel you should be allowed to have a tail undocked by choice. In many countries, tail docking and ear-cropping are either illegal or discouraged. Personal preferences run deep.

 

 

Getting the Hang of It

Stella Swims!

          Before The Swim

Here are three pictures before the swimming part happened.  My daughter, Libby, threw the ball and not one of the three dogs (she has two-Merle, a black lab, and Millie, a Burmese mountain dog) would go get it.   Merle loves sticks and doesn’t really care about balls.  Millie is eight and she just thinks water is not that great.  Only Stella would consider saving her orange ball.  It was so hilarious!  Eventually, she did it!

I thought I’d pass along two videos.  Video_1 is her first moment of realizing that she can swim and the Video is actually the next day when she’s got it down pat and we are in a different part of Bend.

Then This Happened!

We are really lucky to live in a place that is very welcoming to dogs.  We have lots of trails and water areas that she’s been experiencing.   I love the persistence Stella shows in video_1 where you can almost see her thinking, I can do this!  We love our sweet girl.

Have a great week!  ❤️ jill

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Jill, for sharing Stella’s adventure in water retrieval. It is an amazing couple of captures.

Dutch

DutchnMolly[1]

Dutch and Molly (my Grandmother’s OwyheeStar Weimar)

This is our Dutch dog. From the very beginning, you could tell he was going to be a great hunter. But to tell you the truth he’s always going to be my kid. When he was just a babe I started him out young training him with pheasant wings and of course ‘the ball.’ Dutch wouldn’t stop..and in his training he became great.
I decided about three years ago to teach him how to swim. ( Oh, he was 2 years old when he first swam.  ) Mind you he always liked the water. Short hairs usually don’t like the water but he’s a mix* because his Dad is a Longhair. I’d thought I’d risk it. We live on some pretty big water in Boring, Oregon along the Sandy River. The day was hot and water just right. I started him off slow throwing him a stick a little farther each time. After a few trial by error and gulps of water Dutch learned to raise his head and use that long whipping tail as a rudder. By that rate I couldn’t stop him from taking the plunge, jumping in and swimming against the strong currents. Dutch is unstoppable. Thank you, soo much for the joy you’ve brought into our lives. He’s really such a great dog!  😘 ~ Bonney

From Bonney’s Mom–Jane

Dutch has been the best of all the Weimaraners that we have owned.  Some of that may be due to our own growth in how to train a hunting dog, but most of it has to do with his personality.
He plays alone with a stick ball or blanket…throwing it up into the air and pouncing on it, tossing it and chasing it on his own while he spins, jumps and prances.
He plays well with other dogs, too and will lower himself to their level if they are small breeds.
Of course, we treat him like a human member of our family, but he has his own dog bed and toys.  Bonney has assisted greatly in his training to hold or stay.  He will allow Sam to walk around the area while he is on point (hold) and Dutch loves to dive into the brush to retrieve.  He does not like to come back empty handed.  He has also been swimming in the Colorado River and loves the water.
Mom’s dog, Molly, was born about 12 days after Dutch.  Mom and Bonney keep me up to date!

Breeder Comment

We are thrilled to get news for both Molly and Dutch. It is so great that they are doing well. Bonney, we thank you for the lovely video of Dutch swimming. 
*Bonney says he is a Mix–she means that Mama (Cindee) was a traditional Silver Gray smooth coat Weimaraner, whereas the litter was sired by Stackhouse who is a Longhair Weimaraner. Although a great percentage of the OwyheeStar pups learn to love the water, Stackhouse most certainly is a strong swimmer. Nevertheless, most Weims swim because a few things happen in the right way. One thing that really helps is getting the strong recall and the love of the retrieve ingrained. This strategy can work in your favor. Some folks who do not want a bird dog allow their Weimaraner too much freedom–they get the idea they can play keep away. They do not retrieve to hand. Achieving these two necessary skills opens additional doors of opportunity for the hunter and the non-hunter. It is important. Believing it is possible also is key. Getting the Weimaraner to swim is doable! Even in the most reluctant of swimmers, it can be achieved, but exposing them to water early on is best. 
Our puppies swim before leaving here when the weather permits. See the first swim of 2017 below.

At OwyheeStar Earlier This Year

The Sadie X Stackhouse Litter

Swimming Pups

The First Swim

I posted this video on Facebook yesterday. I never gave it much thought, but it deserves an explanation. There are six puppies; four are Longhairs. Of the six, five have the natural European-style tail–full length. This tail length is typical around the world for the Longhairs–and it is the Breed Standard. You may have noticed that the one Blue Ghost puppy has a full-length tail too. It was by request.

B-Sadie X Stackhouse 2017 Week Five Adventure-4.jpgThe traditional undocked puppy requires advance notice. We have a very specific protocol for this situation. I will forego the details here, other than to say we require a larger deposit for the obvious reasons. The number of inquiries regarding the undocked tail continues to increase each year.

Introducing Something New

The pups had never seen more than their water dish. Cliff set them in the water as gentle as possible. They all swam. The Weimaraner has webbed toes, and it should be noted that they are often excellent swimmers. When introducing them to water, it is important to be sure they don’t get spooked. Cliff uses lots of patience when he is working an older pup or an adult into the water. Obviously, you cannot carry them out into the water and then set them gently as Cliff did with the pups.

It is important not to spook them. The best technique is to engrain the love of the retrieve from and early age. This obsession with the retrieve works in your favor to get them into the water. A pond with sloping sides is ideal. First, get them retrieving along the water’s edge. Gradually you will ease them out where they must go beyond the bottom. This process could take a couple of days or weeks. With patience, any Weimaraner can learn to swim.

Here is Stackhouse

     ~ another Longhair

Keep In Mind

All Weimaraners have the potential to take to the water. It takes a bit of knack and patience. Our puppy imprinting does guarantee success–nor does it hurt the process. The retrieving and water-work sometimes get cast to the side during the flurry of early adjustment. There are so many things pulling at the process it is easy to forget a few. Socialization (a lot of touches in a safe way), exposure to noise, ingraining the love of the retrieve (not playing keep away) as well as engaging the pup with water are equally important. Balancing everything you are trying to accomplish–the basics we keep talking about and a lot more while doing it in the right manner is not a small task. It is important to spook them and create a fear of people, places, or situations. Some pups are more sensitive to stimuli, and others let it roll off their back. Approach the process with caution staying optimistic and upbeat. Small steps to success will get you results. Preconceived ideas should be shelved. See what you can become together.

Exhausting

A Tired Weim is a Good Weim

       ~Thank God, it’s Friday!

 

Garin's Luna Exhausting_1330

“Woof!” I tell you something, being good is exhausting!

 

Seriously, that saying is one that is commonplace. It has merit. With the high-energy young Weimaraner, you may find yourself challenged to find age appropriate exercise ideas.

Consider Caution 

Seriously, that saying (about how exhaustion is directly related to the Weim’s behavior) is one that is commonplace. It has merit. With the high-energy young Weimaraner, you may find yourself challenged to find age appropriate exercise ideas. For the long distance runner, the obvious seems to be to hit the trails. Nevertheless, caution is in order. If you are a serious athlete (who goes the distance), you want to get longevity from your Weim’s hips and joints. Therefore, you need to be careful not to overrun the pup’s development and growth–their growth plates do not close until about 15 months. That is a sobering thought.

Other Considerations

Age-appropriate exercise is up for interpretation–like all things subjective. Nevertheless, the high-impact frisbee, agility-type activity, and distances of more than 3 miles should be limited. The latter is most important if the run is on the pavement; however, even pounding the dirt trail can be damaging to those developing joints. We have always suggested you set the Weimaraner up for the longer distances once they are done growing by making better choices–swimming is a favorite. The high-energy Weimaraner can always benefit from being able to water retrieve. Long after the growth plates have closed they will have plenty of energy. If they love to fetch and swim this will be a plus in so many ways.

Insurance

Insurance for your Weimaraner is a good idea–at least major medical. This is especially true for the serious athlete. A torn ACL is expensive to surgically repair. It is said if a ligament problem develops on the left side, the other side may also suffer the same fate. There are other injuries that are equally expensive to treat. Lurking in the background is the risk of bloat–thank goodness, we have only known of a couple of cases in the OwyheeStar Weims. Nevertheless, it is always a risk with this breed. It is also very costly to treat. Should it strike, it is an emergency situation–which may not end well. No one can guarantee such a fate will not visit your household, but to have it do so would (most assuredly) mean to wish you had gotten the insurance.

The Weimaraner can go the distance once they have finished growing. Your faithful running companion should be by your side for a goodly number of years. Consider that hip replacement and other repairs are an option. You might check the insurance to see what it covers and discuss this with your Veterinary office professionals. The person that does the billing will know which insurance pays best and typically have a recommendation.

Luna– does it all!

13529143_1262289560478659_3909295587421553350_nLuna, pictured above and at the top, has many favored activities on land as well as water. She does it all. She is kid friendly and the hostess with the mostest (if you know what we mean). To say she is popular would be a vast understatement. Her life is indeed exhausting. She has a myriad of responsibilities that is mind-boggling. We thank her for all she does for her family and others.

 

 

 

 

 

Virgil

Joins Skeeter Valentine 

          ~ At the Pool

 

January 23, 2017–Kaliece wrote 

          Hi! Wow, time flies.

heermans-virgilSo Virgil is doing great and I just can’t be more pleased with my Skeeter girl. She has accepted him so well and for the most part is really helpful in his training…except when she’s not haha. They are going to be best friends forever. So I have been doing loose leash training with Virgil and it is soooo beneficial to start from the get-go. He totally gets it, now the human needs to continue to follow through haha.Skeeter is really helpful in this area as she stays by me for the most part. So, super excited about this…

I booked Virgil’s swim assessment at Paw’s aquatic on February 2nd. I’m trying to make it so Skeeter can swim at the same time.

We captured this you tube video so we could let you know how it went. We’re excited to see him swim–thought he did great for his first time. 

Breeder Comment

It is great to hear from you and to see Virgil doing so well with training. We are glad you were able to have them swim in tandem. It is going to be great fun for all concerned. Thank you, for keeping us in the loop.

Do Not Despise Small Beginnings

Skeeter Valentine_2146New Things Take Time

Hi and happy fall!

Just a quick note to let you know we have found an indoor pool with regulation dock diving dock and have taken Skeeter there twice in the last month. It is primarily a rehab clinic for dogs, but the owner also opens it up for recreational swims and dock diving practice.

The first time was a swim assessment and she passed with flying colors. The second visit was to work on getting her to jump off the dock. The first time or two it took a lot of coaxing but then the next time she jumped. After that, she began to hesitate again. The trainer said that was entirely expected. I know once she gets over that initial fear she’s going to fly!

I have included a video. 😮 Unfortunately, she required coaxing for the most part. She will gain confidence and become an excellent dock diver with time.

Skeeter’s Practive Dock Dive

We Lost Kava

Oh, by the way, Skeeter lost her best friend about six weeks ago. Our Kava was put down due to a liver mass. At thirteen years, I couldn’t see putting her through anything just for me. She was suddenly VERY ill. Therefore, the decision to let her go came without notice.

We were both so sad to see her go. Skeeter got sick after that for about a week. It was worrisome. She had severe bloody stress diarrhea. We had to put her on IV fluids and injectable meds due to vomiting. We couldn’t find any medical reason for her illness. Maybe just grief and that stress. Poor girl. Obviously much better now! 

Thanks for Skeeter Valentine and you take care, Kaliece

Breeder’s Comment: We are pleased that Skeeter is learning to dock dive. It is an excellent opportunity. She appears to be getting comfortable with the process. Soon, it will be second nature. Maybe the two of you will end up on television. 

We were very sad to learn of your loss of Kava. We know it is hard for everyone. Thank you, for taking care of Skeeter on every level. We hope the two of you find great joy together.