Category Archives: OwyheeStar

Berkley

Peck's Berkley_660
Berkley is having fun in the leaves!

Growing, Learning, and a lot of Fun!

 

Berkley is growing like a weed. Sometimes we call her “bean stalk” because she is growing so fast.

She’s learning more and more every day and we are enjoying her so very much. She is sweet with a twist of feistiness!

Berkley and Our DaughtersPeck's Berkley_987

Berkley is excited about learning Latin along with our daughters.
Peck's Berkley_144726Then, she is showing off her ability to heel alongside our 7-year-old. We use the Starmark Collar you recommend on your website and taught our girls how to use it properly.
Until next time,
Amanda

Breeder Comment

We are delighted to learn that things are going well with Berkley. It is great she is such an integral part of the family. Then too–it is beyond surprising that she is heeling for your 7-year-old daughter. Many of our adults (write us) that they are unable to achieve the loose-leash heel. When you understand how to use that collar, and it is used (correctly) a lot of good things can happen.

We sincerely appreciate you thinking of us and sharing a window into your life with Berkley. Keep up the consistent effort and things will continue to move forward positively.

2017 40th Recap

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

       ~October 14, 2017

Nielsen Farm Hay October 2017Last Saturday our hay (the fifth cutting) graced our fields. The first cutting was chopped. This week the final 2017 cutting found its way into the stack. It was kind of a pathetic amount, but we subscribe to the fact that each bit adds up. As fields age, they produce less, and the back field is slated to be taken out. Winter wheat will replace it soon. Now, for those wondering–no Roundup herbicide will be used on our wheat. Honestly, the use of Roundup on wheat in the United States may be rare–unlike many health-gurus would have you to believe. At least locally we do not see this happening. To the north in Alberta, Canada (we read) about the practice of spraying the wheat in a field before the harvest. The purpose is to dry things enough to harvest. Here and most places in America, we don’t need to practice those measures–our stalks mature for harvest without the aid of a desiccant. And, just to set the record straight, farmers are not dousing their wheat at harvest in the truck as videos would have you to believe. Roundup is not used on wheat other than as a desiccant (as far as we know). It requires the crop be genetically altered (Roundup-ready)–this is a hot topic. We only mention it because we are planting the wheat and we have some insight into local farming practices. (Enough said!)

Atti X Boone Oct 13, 2017 Adventure-39.jpgWe prefer talking about happy topics–such as the Weimaraner. Weimlovers can all agree on their addiction to the breed.

Walking

With Tikka

22291299_10210523866033859_1412669170486689341_oYou remember our previous blog post and my concern about Luna and my relationship–well, we are doing well. There are the fun challenges. Have you ever walked a pup?

 

Tikka: She is doing great! Like all of the other reports, she is super smart, healthy & fitting in perfectly! She is very good about house training (only one accident, but we were not paying attention!), not afraid of anything (except Luna’s bark, must be serious if Luna is concerned!), we are working on a small remodel project and she’s not even scared of any of the power tools! Beautiful little girl!

Accepted

 

IMG_2886.JPG

 

She’s also become friends with Luna’s kitty!

 

 

2017 39th Recap

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

       ~October 7, 2017

Nielsen Farm 2017 4th Hay Cutting-5Welcome to October! It seems as summer has flown by and that was after a longer than typical wait. None of that might be true; however, there is no denying the last winter saga has cast a shadow forward. Winter-loving sorts are looking forward to the snow and all that goes with it. Others who work in the element, drive a lot or remember the extraordinary Western Treasure Valley snowpack are not so ready. The collapse of buildings is still in our recent memory. Driving through Vale, there is the lot with the collapsed building fenced–it is a sad reminder. Many of these losses have not been replaced, and several are not yet cleaned up. Predictions are for something similar, and we can hope that the loses are not as impacting.

Our hay guy showed up with the John Deere Steamer-Baler sporting the American Flag. I love patriots. The American Farmer has recently gotten a bad wrap. You may not agree with everything that surrounds the farming industry, but we ought never forget America has had the best food supply in the world. Today we salute area farmers who work long hours and raise a variety of crops.

2017 38th Recap

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

       ~September 30, 2017

 

What’s Behind?

The Photo Shoot

~ or the glamor photos as I like to call them

A lot happens behind the scenes. The pups in this photo shoot are three-weeks-old.  They are not willing participants. We are not professional photographers. We have decent equipment–thank goodness. We take a lot of photos to get a few we consider good enough to post for the weekly update. Cliff and Christina run the camera. Sometimes there is puppy whispering involved or mollycoddling too. The pups see and hear so we make noise and try to get them to look at the camera–the result is often something entirely different.

 

Eventually, We Get Something Like This

Please Note: These are not current pups available for placement. They are pictures from a previous photo shoot.

Understanding the Application Process

Dear OwyheeStar Applicants

14711261_10154671211567300_6666669904620206790_oCommunication is tricky–no matter whether you are writing, texting or having a discussion. The goal is communicating our idea or thought, or possibly trying to educate someone. I reply to a lot of emails. Then too, there are the application responses. Sometimes this involves a follow-up query to clarify the applicant’s answer or to fill in something left blank. A recent encounter left me feeling cold and licking more than a few wounds; however, I am sure my intent was misunderstood. Maybe I should have added some emojis–honestly, I am not too skilled at using those cute add-ins. That would set a tone rather than leaving the recipient to guess what I mean and the voice behind the ink.

Grammerly.com says, “If there’s controversy around emojis in business communication, then why do we feel compelled to use them? Why not forego them altogether? The simple answer: we want to be better understood. Email communication is notoriously problematic in that it lacks the emotional cues we rely on with face-to-face or phone conversations. Without tone of voice or facial expressions to guide us, there’s a lot of room for misunderstanding when we read an email. Messages meant to be positive are often interpreted as neutral, and neutral messages are interpreted as negative”.

Setting a Positive Tone

Well then, that leaves me being negative sounding a lot. Our application process is an area where I am positive more than a few persons have been miffed by the questions. In fact, someone said they were sick of my interrogation techniques–I was shocked because I was merely asking one question about a two-part question–the second part was left blank. I think the question is valid; they see my asking them as intrusive and are offended. In all honesty, I could have prefaced the question more tactfully–and the addition of emoji may have set a more friendly tone. Would that family have made a good puppy home? We will never know. Of course, I want to avoid these types of scenarios, but when it comes to matters of the heart a lot of things can go sideways. I was scolded and let know their money is good and their character the same. I am sure both things are true; however, that was not what was in question.

 

Delays Happen

Bradford's Lily Arrives_2616.jpg

Eventually, if all goes as planned there is this!

A delay may seem like I don’t value you or our application. It is in truth, nothing like that. Rather I am engaged with the must-do and the most pressing things. Some of these cannot wait. Each day I am amazed at the workload for both Cliff and I. At the same time, we give thanks for this opportunity to provide a service so many appreciate.

We Take This Process Serious

The importance of our application process cannot be understated. Asking clear and concise questions to get the information that will clue us about the pup’s future seems valid. Nevertheless, communication issues (being misunderstood) will probably always be an issue. There other factors behind the scene too!

1. Each inquiry has an agenda–sometimes these are hidden (you would be surprised).
2. Everyone has done research; however, no one can guess how deep you are going to be required to dig to get through the Weimaraner puppy phase.
3. Each person comes with experience–this is all too often not going to apply to the Weimaraner. It is hard for a diehard Labrador person to believe this breed is different.
4. Each candidate believes they are ideal. Implying anything less or inquiring about something is offensive. We understand.
5. Dog savvy persons fail with this breed–it happens for a myriad of reasons. Let’s not place blame; instead, let’s agree it happens too often.
6. First-time Weim folks sometimes succeed beyond our wildest expectations. A pattern seems apparent to us. Most of these listen to our advice on how to raise the Weimaraner and do their best to follow it.
7. Honestly, it takes patience and a measure of trust to work with us. We typically have a Wait List. We cannot guess exactly how things will unfold–whether a mating will result in a litter, how many pups will be born, what sex or what coat color they will be. Yes, we sometimes have an all blue litter or an all gray litter; however, most of our litters have mixed coat colors. Some litters will produce a few Longhairs–how many is always in question. There are statistics, but we have learned the hard way that it is an average. The same parents might only produce two Longhair (of eight) pups one year. The next they may yield six of eight. Therefore, when statistically it says you will get 50% or 25% depending on the situation, the percentage can vary more than we expected in a specific litter.

From our side of the Fence

14715557_10154671175832300_446631710715652189_oWe must consider the pup’s welfare first and foremost. If we don’t have peace about a situation, it might not reflect on you at all. It may mean that we are not the right breeder for you. Sometimes we dare to tell applicants that we feel another breed choice would better suit their needs. Should we ever say that? I think we should. It is our opinion. A person can take it or leave. They can buy the Weimaraner from someone else. If all else fails, they can get one online.

Despite Communication Hiccups

Over time we have forged some beautiful relationships with OwyheeStar clients. If we had passed on the street we might not have given each other more than a nod or a smile; however, our hearts are forever joined. It is amazing how a fur family member can impact our lives in ways we would never have imagined. So, when we delve into the ticky-tacky details we sincerely hope you understand our motive. We are not interested in how much money you have–just that you have enough to give adequate care. Yes, we realize having money means better food and unlimited veterinary care. Nevertheless, even when a person has plenty of money and the desire, it is not a rock-solid guarantee that things will not go sideways.

We thank you for your patience and your understanding. We are honored to think of some many of you are friends. Some of you are more like family. We share things others would never understand.

~ Shela (and Cliff)

2017 36st Recap

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

      ~September 16, 2017

September Corn Harvest and Sunrise-17

The truck is here and the corn chopping for silage continues!

 

This Week on the Blog

Here are the week’s posts if you wish you may review or visit them today!

 

Peck's Berkley-9374

Berkley

We are thrilled to have such a grand mix of updates this week. We have a young OwyheeStar’s beginning, adding a second girl to the family, grouse hunting, and Porche who is acting as a type of support for her Mama. Then there is the beloved Clyde–another sofa back sitter. Isn’t it fabulous? Thanks ever so much to each contributor!

Sunday— September 10 — Adding A Second She

Monday — September 11 —Thursday, September 14, 2017

Tuesday — September 12  — Berkley

Wednesday — September 13 Grouse Opener

Thursday  — September 14Porche

Friday  — September 15 — Clyde

 

On a very personal note

 

IMG_3128

 

Our recent schedule around the farm and the farmhouse has left us wanting. Outside the spiders are moving in and some have taken up residence inside too. I am in a battle with the dust. I am pretty confident that dust is winning. Christina helped push back a bit, and I made a promise to get after this soon.

Our neighbors gave us a bag of peppers and a few tomatoes. At first, I was thinking what am I going to do with them? Cliff doesn’t eat peppers. I don’t eat many myself. Then I decided to try to make some pepper sauce — kind of like you would find on buffalo wings or sticky chicken. I have done this before; however, it took a lot of sugar. This time I made it without the sugar. Then I cut up a chicken breast and just lightly coated it with plain flour and fried it in coconut oil. Once browned, I tossed in two or three heaping tablespoons of the pepper sauce. I let it simmer and coat the chicken and removed it to a serving dish and sprinkled it with a generous dose of sesame seeds. It was surprisingly good. Cliff tried a piece and nodded his head–he was eating gluten-free football pizza.

I used the rest of the peppers to make the sauce, but I don’t have enough stevia and erythritol to make another batch. I froze a half gallon of this super hot unsweetened pepper sauce. What was left found itself getting some crushed pineapple, green onions, and vinegar–to make a sweet-n-sour sauce. None of this took much effort. All I did was cut the peppers into pieces and cook them on top of the stove. Then I removed the large chunks of pepper and whirled them in the Vitamix (adding some crushed tomatoes). Finally, I put it all back on the stove to simmer and thicken. All I had to do was check it once in awhile and keep the exhaust fan going so the aroma didn’t burn our eyes.

OwyheeStar business has been the focus. I am still running behind here on application replies and general upkeep. Cliff has been mowing, irrigating, tending the Weims, and he hatched some more quail. Then too, there is the ongoing general cleanup. He cleaned out some of the remaining things left from his father in the carport storage. It is amazing how many times we have filled the dumpster. It is heading for another overfill this week.

I am still obsessed with the  Cyclamen. Nevertheless, I left this until last. We are gaining blossoms, and soon we will have a baker’s dozen–maybe more. What an amazing plant my friend Eleanor brought to me during the 2012 hospital stay. Who could have imagined it would live let alone produce hundreds of blooms. Until I broke the top off, there was only the one two-week period when there was not at least one bloom. Most of the time there were multiple flowers or the angelic host of blossom as I called it.

Grouse Opener

North Central Washington

     ~ Hunting Dusty and Ruffled Grouse 

Dealy's George Grouse Opener2017-3

Dealy's George Grouse Opener2017-2Hi guys, I hope your summer has gone well. Just wanted to send some photos from our grouse opener weekend- (between me, a friend and George from Stackhouse and Mousse) we hit about 15 dusky and ruffed grouse over 3 days!
We were hunting in north central Washington, there’s a lot of empty public space out there. It’s not as high as our Cascades are there, normally I see mostly duskies and rarely ruffs but this was the opposite.
Dealy's George Grouse Opener2017-5
~Richard
Dealy's George Grouse Opener2017-4For those that don’t know–, these are forest grouse or mountain grouse.
Dusky/blue grouse are northwest birds but ruffed grouse are the nature northern part of the continent. You see both in thick forests and blue grouse only usually above 4 or 5000 feet.
The other American grouse species like sage grouse or prairie chickens or sharp tailed grouse are mostly plains or desert birds so that would be more likely what you’d see down your way.

Breeder Comment

We appreciate the update and news that George is proving to be a worthy Versatile Hunting Companion. The work you put in is paying dividends.
Although many non-hunters read our blog, it is important to remember that the Weimaraner is a Versatile Hunting Companion. When properly trained they can be an all-around companion and swell family member. Having a job (such as hunting) is a great outlet for them. Many non-traditional hunters are taking up Shed Hunting or Truffle hunting. Oregon Truffles are a thing! The Weimaraner nose should be ideal when trained to search for this treasure–click here! George has a job (probably more than one) and whatever the Weimaraner’s role in the household they need to do more than being a couch sitter.
The Grouse is not a frequent topic of discussion as our Sage Grouse (Sage Hens) are somewhat elusive and require a tag. The numbers are fair; however, there is great concern over their future. The wildfires that ravaged vast expanses of BLM ground during the last few years have damaged habitat. Who can gauge what the long term effect this burn off will have on these birds and other wildlife? Here are some links if this is of interest.

2017 35th Recap

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

      ~September 9, 2017

This Week on the Blog

Here are the week’s posts if you wish you may review or visit them today!

We began with football this week! Not a welcome topic to all, but for many a clear signal of the season. We published Part Two of Extending Our Time. We hope you found something significant.

We absolutely appreciate you (who sent an update) for taking the time and effort! Thus far, we have been getting enough to keep us in business. (Happy Look from Shela!)

Sunday— September 3 — For All of Who (Love Football)

Monday — September 4 — Sometimes (I travel with Layna)

Tuesday — September 5  — Extending Our Time (Insight in preventing loss-Part Two)

Wednesday — September 6To Grammy’s Garden We Go (Goldee and Mav)

Thursday  — September 7I Get Around (Lily makes fun everywhere she goes)

Friday  — September 8 — Kaiser

 

On a very personal note

cyclamen-2

IMG_3128

I am still obsessed with the  Cyclamen. I promise to move on from this topic soon; however, it keeps grabbing my heart and soul. It speaks to me in ways I could not have imagined. I think post cancer, the common more than whispers its truth. Sometimes it screams it and rubs it into our very being. This situation speaks of life after being mown down. Can you see the similarity?

Around the farm, Cliff is busy trying to keep up with the repairs and maintenance. There has been no time to work on the farmhouse. I am engaged with the current pups we have on the ground. Our vision is toward the tasks at hand. These must be done to the best of our ability. We also have placed two adult Weims; they required a certain amount of preparation. Sage and Roxy are leaving together for the Spokane area. By no means are they finished. They will require a lot of work. Nevertheless, they leave together. We believe they will be a comfort to each other. Hopefully, they will bring healing to a family who had to say goodbye to their beloved former rescue. These are the types of things taking up our time and requiring our attention. Other things–like spider patrol have taken a back seat. On a far Eastern Oregon farm, this spider issue is a thing. This time of year