Category Archives: VHDF

Mesquite

Thriving In Her Golden Year Placement

August 31, 2017 (Lyle keeps us apprised)

Birch's Mesquite_0627Everything is going great with Mesquite, she is settling in just fine.  She did a little howling, but that has been about it.  She loves her morning walks, she is eating well.  She has been taking a nap after eating and walking which works out just right for us.  We leave the house at 5:45 AM in the morning and walk for about an hour.  She has found out what puncture vines are.  When she steps on one, she will stop and raise her paw so we can remove it.

We are taking her out to the vet tomorrow afternoon, for her checkup.

I have been keeping her in the house during the day because it is so darn hot.  She sleeps in her kennel at night. I run the fan until about 3AM.

She is a Peach, and we both love her dearly. Everyone comments how pretty she is while we are out walking.  I like to go early in the morning, because it is cool, and there are usually no other dogs out and about. I showed pictures of her at the gun club yesterday.  Steve Williams really liked her.

September 1, 2017

Birch's Mesquite_0619We took Mesquite to the Vet this afternoon, she did well, she is good and healthy. The girls at the clinic just loved her. She got her rabies shot, will get a kennel cough in two weeks.
Set her up on the 26th of September to get her spayed, will also get her teeth cleaned. They can clean her teeth while under anesthetic.
She really has a personality, she can walk on her lip when things don’t go her way, but she gets over it quickly. We both love her dearly and I am sure she feels the same about us. The girls at the Vet clinic said they didn’t think it would be long before we had another dog.
She is still eating well, even with the heat. She always leaves a few kernels of dog food in the pan when she is done. Maybe she is saving some food for later in the day. It is the same each feeding. I am sure she will eat better when it cools off. She is very alert and doesn’t miss a thing. She sleeps with one eye open.

September 6, 2017Birch's Mesquite_0623

Cliff:
I loaded up 10 or 12 shotshells with just the primer. I took Mesquite out in the field, had my wife hold her on the leash, I would fire a couple of rounds and move closer each two rounds. I fired the last two rounds at about five yards from her, she showed no fear.  She seemed interested.  I took her down to the trap range today. I stayed 60 yards behind the shooters, again she showed interest and no fear. I conclude she is not gun shy.
Now I have to find some pheasants. I might have to wait until after she is spayed and healed up. Will probably wait until I go over to my son’s place in Montana. I can work with her one on one, with no other hunters or dogs around.
I wanted to show her off to the guys at the trap club today. A lot of them hunt and they thought she was gorgeous. I especially wanted Steve Williams to see her, and he thought she was a doll. He said he thought Mesquite was a little bit longer than his female.
She likes her morning walks, sometimes I walk her twice a day. She has pretty much seattled in here. She sticks to me like glue. The only problem I had with her, she howls a little at night, and when we are gone during the day. She is getting better. I am thinking of getting a bark collar and trying that. I think she misses her kennel mates. I got her some chew bones to help keep her teeth clean, and the part she doesn’t eat she will hide. She learned to do this if she wanted to keep it away from the other dogs. We are more than happy with her, and I think she likes it her. I think she will hunt birds.
September 7, 2018
Thanks for sending video of the OwyheeStar Weimaraner’s.  I was listening to them and Mesquite was in the room with me, and she recognized Cliff voice, she got all excited.   She knew who it was all right.

September 15, 2008 (a note from Cliff and Shela)

For Those That don’t know about Mesquite—click here!

We received a phone call from Lyle telling us everything is going well. The only problem he has encountered is she seems to have a desire to chase cars.

Mesquite has never had the opportunity to give chase to a car, a bike, or a skateboard. Nonetheless, this desire to give chase is hard-wired into the breed. It has a lot to do with prey drive; so caution is in order when walking in an area where there are turning wheels. This advice is good for anyone.

Mesquite also committed a Weim-crime. She cleaned a platter of sausage meant for Lyle’s breakfast. Evidently, she navigated the counter between two glasses and slicked up the plate without moving a thing. Welcome to Weim Counter-surfing. It is their Olympic Sport of choice.

Thank you ever so much for everything you are doing for and with Mesquite. And we truly appreciate you keeping us abreast of your progress and the adventures. We know you have always had other breeds (mainly the Vizsla recently) so we are thrilled you are enjoying this experience. Tell the Williams we said hello!

Kaiser

Kaizer is doing great! 

Allen's Kaiser 863He’s doing well with basic commands and loves fetching his toys.  He acts all big and tough but is scared to death of kids waiting for the school buds in the early morning and freaks out when he sees his own reflection.

 

Allen's Kaiser 0941aThis guy is a tiny tank for now but the vet was shocked at how solid and big he looked at 9 weeks, they think he’s going to be huge.Went camping at the Sawtooth range over the weekend and he loved all the sticks to chew on.  Did some swimming and had his first leech experience.  I was pleased at how well he behaved around a bunch of strangers (only barking once the whole time) and recieved lots of admiration from all.  Lost count of all the times someone would comment on how good looking he was, one comment was even shouted from the other side of a small lake.

Thanks for pairing me up with this awesome little guy! ~Peter

Allen's Kaiser 318d

Breeder Comment

It is always great to hear that an OwyheeStar pup is off to a good start. We thank you for remembering us and sending the update including the great photos. We know many of our followers are going to love seeing Kaiser.

We look forward to hearing more as he grows and develops.

OwyheeStar Foundations

Remembering Deli

Deli 9 Days before her departure

One year ago today, we said our final goodbye to the beloved Deli. She was right at the 16 year mark. Her life was full and well-lived until the very end. The photo and the video was taken nine days before her departure. You know (if you have walked this path) about the breath holding and wondering when the inevitable will come. It is never delayed enough.

There are many OwyheeStar notables. Possibly few are as foundational as Deli. Many of our clients have her lineage weaved into their pedigree. Here a few pups we saved over a period of fifteen years (and three generations).

  • Callie (Deli X Zeke) <–retired
  • Moxie (Deli X Zeke <–retired
  • Pepper (Mollie X Zeke) <–retired
  • Mollie (Deli X Dash) <–retired
  • Ginger (Callie X Zee) <–retired
  • Cindee (Callie X Zee) <–retired
  • Midge (Callie X Benton) <–retired
  • Millee (Moxie X Benton<–retired
  • Bernie (Millee X Stackhouse)
  • Wilma (Mesquite X Stackhouse)
  • Mesquite (Moxie X Benton)
  • Hollee (Deli X Zee) — Deli’s last baby
  • Mousse (Callie X Zee)

Weaving the DNA

You might understand more clearly what our DNA weaving involved. We used different sires with the females over time to gain our outcome. Ultimately, the pedigree will contain one or more of our foundation Weimars–Dash, Dusty, Stormy, Blue, Zee, Zeke, True, and Topper. I am sure there are others that should be mentioned but those are the most prevalent. It was a costly venture on every level to do this type of thing rather than to stick with a narrower process–only adding a new Stud Dog as the need arose.

 

At Six Months

Hello from Tony @ Tonasket,  WA

 

I wanted to give you an update on Apollo.  He is doing well.  He is now just going to turn what 8 months old and he is already hunting, setting birds, pointing a little bit, and doing so retrieving.  I have had him out every week hunting since bird season opened and he loves it.  He goes 90 miles on hour and has tons of fun.  He is a wonderful dog hunting.  Really truly a gifted hunter.  I am not into trials or those things but I tell you want he could be trained to champion I mean he is WOW.

 

THANK YOU SO MUCH.  I cannot say thank you enough.  I really thank you from my heart I lost my other dog and still hurt for that loss.  But Apollo has been a wonderful addition to my life and really I cannot say thank you enough.

 

Tony

I hope you are well also.

Breeder Comment

owyheestar-colored-field-weim-logo-2We have heard from Tony twice. He is a very busy attorney who also owns a ranch. He didn’t include a photo. In lieu of a photo of his Gray Ghost we can speculate a bit. This is a litter mate related to the following featured pups.

Arliss

Young Arliss

Chester's ArlissBlue Runner Duck_

This Blue Runner Duck was introduced to the young Arliss. We can only imagine what he was thinking; both survived the experience. It was a good thing as the duck was a Christmas present.

Ten Year Old ArlissChester's Arliss Birdy

He is still checking out the birds. This time to his chagrin the pheasant has no bird scent, but it appeared on the deck. He did his duty.

The Weimaraner is a Versatile Hunting Dog.

               ~What does that mean? 

Here is the definition of a versatile hunting dog taken from the Versatile Hunting Dog Federation (VHDF) website:

The versatile hunting dog is a foot hunting dog developed for work before and after the shot under a variety of conditions in the field, forest, and water.   Generally speaking, most of the versatile hunting dogs were developed in Europe during the 19th century due to hunting laws which required all game to be recovered after it was shot.  This change in hunting ethics led to the need for a dog that could perform universally at a range of tasks.  Breeders of that time took traits from the best of the specialist breeds and combined them into what are known as the versatile breeds today.  Because of the demands placed on them, versatile dogs must be intelligent, with the willpower to persevere and the ability to concentrate under numerous and variable conditions.  Searching, pointing, tracking wounded game, cold water retrieving, blood tracking and blind searching are all necessary capabilities for versatile hunting dogs.

Since most versatile dogs enjoy a long tradition of selective breeding for highly cooperative and trainable character, they make great companions in and around the home.  Well bred versatile dogs are highly intelligent with a calm demeanor.  These characteristics make them suitable family dogs as they love people and are gentle around children.

Gobbo

Points & Retrieves

Gobbo is one-year old. He lives (and hunts) with Tom in Utah.

The Weimaraner by definition is a versatile hunting breed. What does that mean? In America, we refer to the two Versatile Hunting Dog Venue Opportunities. They vary in philosophy but give the versatile hunter and breeder a great opportunity. You can find the links to explore the information below for both the Versatile Hunting Dog Federation (VHDF) as well as the North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association (NAVHDA).

The Versatile Hunting Dog (VHDF)

The versatile hunting dog is a foot hunting dog developed for work before and after the shot under a variety of conditions in the field, forest, and water.   Generally speaking, most of the versatile hunting dogs were developed in Europe during the 19th century due to hunting laws which required all game to be recovered after it was shot.  This change in hunting ethics led to the need for a dog that could perform universally at a range of tasks.  Breeders of that time took traits from the best of the specialist breeds and combined them into what are known as the versatile breeds today.  Because of the demands placed on them, versatile dogs must be intelligent, with the willpower to persevere and the ability to concentrate under numerous and variable conditions.  Searching, pointing, tracking wounded game, cold water retrieving, blood tracking and blind searching are all necessary capabilities for versatile hunting dogs. 
 
Since most versatile dogs enjoy a long tradition of selective breeding for highly cooperative and trainable character, they make great companions in and around the home.  Well bred versatile dogs are highly intelligent with a calm demeanor.  These characteristics make them suitable family dogs as they love people and are gentle around children. © Versatile Hunting Dog Federation

Versatile Hunting Dog In The Field (NAVHDA)

In the field, a versatile dog should exhibit a fine nose, staunch pointing and the desire to search for, track and retrieve game in a cooperative manner. A versatile dog needs to further prove his independence, stamina and quality of nose by transferring his search for, and retrieving of game, to the water. NAVHDA’s testing program provides an opportunity for dogs to exhibit these characteristics while remaining obedient and in control at all times. True versatile dogs should perform all tasks with enthusiasm and be willing to work with, and for, their handlers.

Breeder’s Comments

It is always great to have a hunter capture photos or a video. ???

Avoid This

Advice best heeded

The last thing any of us wants to be is a stumbling block to our pup’s development. We do everything in preparation; spend a small fortune. We study, research and find every area resource. The best Veterinarian is a must. Everyone in the pup’s life is vetted. Despite this plan, most of the behavioral problems on the path to maturity are caused by the well-meaning human. It is a sad fact. There is no one-size fits all situation guide book for the Weimaraner. It takes more than dog savvy; it takes a bit of a knack. Sometimes it takes some good fortune. Seriously, though, you can avoid many of the issues that haunt the Weimaraner and their owners. To be honest, most of the folks we know with this issue are non-hunters who didn’t introduce their Weimaraner to gunfire.

Annually our mailbox sees a flood of chat prior to the 4th of July. The impending holiday booms begin and all too many Weims shake and quiver; some become ill from the hubbub. They are wrapped in Thunder coats, shaking in the closet, and traumatized. It is a sad state of affair. At the same, it is a shocking truth that many Weims are unfazed by the loud sounds. Ask yourself what makes such a difference? We can find a clue among our gun enthusiast types. The last thing they want is a gun-shy hunting companion.

Avoiding This Pitfall

 

Introducing the gun.JPG

No Gunfire for the young pup who scents the gun. It must smell good!

While loud sounds might be unnerving; they are not (in most cases) cause for fear. Our Weimaraner must be conditioned to ignore them, and they should feel safe. Steve Snell (of Gun Dog Supply) is a professional trainer. He says it this way.

 

All gun shy dogs are man made. While some dogs may be more prone to becoming gunshy, it is not a genetic flaw. Some dogs are more sensitive, and this can make them more “likely” to become gunshy. Even the boldest of pups can become gunshy if the introduction to the gun is not handled correctly.

Non-Hunters Take Note

Sound sensitivity is just as much a priority for a companion Weimaraner as for those that participate in Versatile Hunting. As we mentioned early, fireworks for many Weim are their undoing. We feel it behooves us all to try to avoid this scenario where fear rules.

At OwyheeStar, the pups have received exposure to loud sounds–much like you introduce gun fire. It was systematic, and the noise became a backdrop. Some pups are more sensitive than others; however, with conditioning,they too ignore loud sounds. While many you might get lucky and nothing bad happens by not heeding this advice; better safe than sorry is a terrific approach. OwyheeStar pup conditioning is only a foundation–not the end. Proceed with caution, and even if you are non-hunter think of how nice it would be to avoid the gut-wrenching fear situation. Therefore, once the pups have come home, it is important to continue this process. With all the things going on this little detail (regarding sound) can be forgotten. The non-hunter can take a cue from these tips and make the necessary adjustments. Steve Snell goes on to share how to help avoid causing the problem.

The following method works fine with pointers, flushers, and retrievers. While I start all my pups using these techniques, this method will work with any age dog that needs conditioning to guns and gunfire.

There are several things that you should NEVER, EVER do to a young dog.

  • Never fire a gun around a dog to see IF he is gunshy
  • Never take a dog to a Shooting Range to introduce gunfire
  • Never take a dog “hunting” prior to the proper introduction to gunfire
  • Never take a young dog “hunting” with an older dog for some “on the job training” prior to the proper introduction to gunfire
  • Never fire a gun close to a young dog without proper introduction — keep him away from any kind target practice or random shooting
  • Never allow your dog to be exposed to fireworks
  • Never fire a gun close to a dog while feeding him (many folks do this but it does not make the proper association)
  • Do your best to keep him indoors during major lightning and thunder storms

Many young dogs become gunshy from things that are out of the owners control or unknown to the owner. It’s best to get started on gunfire and noise introduction as soon as possible. I start mine the day they get to my house. Click Here to read more from Steve Snell.

What Can We Do?

We can agree on avoiding the medication needed scenario. So, you will want to condition your young Weimaraner to noise. In many cases, this means introducing gunfire using tried and true practices. As Steve mentions; however, there are times when things go awry–despite your best effort. One such time is during what some people refer to as a sudden fear period. We have also heard it called teenage-flakiness. We prefer to think of it as a transition period, where the pup is at more risk of developing an issue. It comes out of seemingly nowhere.

The commonplace suddenly freaks them out. The unexpected can be almost anything. For example, someone wearing a hat reaches towards them and spooks them. You console them, but from there on out they are a hot mess when they see a man in a hat–it would be funny if it wasn’t so frustrating. Just transfer this example to the Weimaraner that is startled by the sudden loud sound. You console them, and your heart goes out to them. Did you know that you probably just ingrained that fear? Absolutely! The most natural response is the worst response. You say what are you talking about?

Beyond conditioning your puppy on every level (exposure to people, touch, the car, waves, dogs, and sound), the second most important thing you must do is to be non-reactive. The poor baby is not going to serve the pup well on any level. Instead, move forward with no concern and stay calm. Get out of the situation gracefully and leave it behind. If you treat it like it is nothing, then your Weimaraner is going to see it as much less of a threat. By the way, this applies to crazy people encounters, out of control dog situations, and loud noises. You set the tone, and you are the stabilizing factor.

 

 

Gabriel

 Blue-tiful!

 

Gabriel began her life (on February 28, 2012) at OwyheeStar. She was one of seven pups born to Livee’s litter (which was sired by OwyheeStar’s Once In A Blue Moon). Some of her littermates have made an OwyheeStar Blog News appearance; none more than the amazing Maizie. There are some other pups from the same parents; however, they were born a year later. Possibly, the most famous of these lives in Idaho (Charlie Blue). Gabriel was the first blue to arrive in Russia. She traveled via courier and arrived safely. Of course, there was a huge adjustment period after the relocation. Nevertheless, she came through and shines bright. The judges like her beauty and conformation. Two participations and two positive outcomes. You can read more on Igor’s website (click here )!

We look forward to hearing more about Gabriel and her successful offspring– The Blue Girl O’Hara which netted the BJB (Best of Junior Breed).

 

Useful abbreviations

 

CW – Class Winner

CAC ( National Dog Show  Certificat d’Aptitude au Championnat. Your dog will need 1-6 CAC certificates to become a National Champion. The number depends on the country of issue.

CACIB ( International Dog Show) Certificat d’Aptitude au Championnat International de Beaute. Your dog will need 2-3 CACIB certificates which are highly compatible in order to become and International CH.

BOB – Best of Breed

BIS – Best in Show

 

 

Stihl

Hunting Chukars

Stihl had a great time hunting chukars the past couple weekends. The snow is deep and the birds are plentiful. Despite having a challenging time getting through the snow, he had a good few days. He retrieved 2 birds last weekend (with help getting into the area). It’s amazing how fast he is learning. He retrieved 4 birds this last trip without any guidance. I’m excited to see how Stihl progresses through the rest of the bird season.
Thanks again,       ~Matt and Veronica Stanley

Stihl

Wears the Blaze Orange Collar

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Our puppy update is long overdue. We cannot tell you how happy we are with our beautiful boy. He is incredibly smart and is learning is jobs at home quickly. He immediately loved doggie day-camp and even as a small puppy he fearlessly played hard with the big dogs. He is extremely brave and tenacious. It has been so much fun to watch his personality develop. We have been using the ‘learn -to-earn’ method of training for basic obedience and it has been awesome for establishing a happy relationship with Stihl. These pictures span a couple months, so you can see his progress. We favor a blaze orange collar since his blue coat seems to disappear into the background.

Matt has been gradually working on hunt training. This fall Stihl at just four months old retrieved his first bird. Stihl is also doing very well with endurance-dog training. It only took a few rides for him to lean to stay away from the horses feet and he has not yet been stepped on! We love how bonded his is to us. Even out with the horses, Stihl is always ‘checking in’ to see where we are, and looking for his next command.

We’ll try to have another update to you soon since there is so much progress in so short a time span. I remember Cliff mentioning he is planning a springtime bird training session at the farm. We’re definitely interested in attending, so any information on that would be appreciated.

Thank you again for such a wonderful addition to our family.

~Matt and Veronica