Category Archives: Getting an OwyheeStar Puppy

Elle and her Preparation

~For the new puppy (Ace!)

Once Elle found out we were getting Ace this Friday (2/1/2019), she had to stop and get his name tag made!

For the past couple of years, we have been talking as a family about getting a 3rd Owyheestar puppy for our family (primarily for Elle our Daughter).  The thought of a 3rd dog is a little daunting, but early this last summer, Elle started to try and sell this hard to Jill and I.  Her final proposal went something like this… “So, I’m likely going to college in about 5 years, so if we are thinking of getting me my own dog, if we wait too long, I won’t have as much time with him.  Also, I will pay for as much of him as I can working small jobs and babysitting over this summer.”  


With that. we were sold and we told her the target amount we wanted her to provide (20%) and she agreed.  We sent our deposit with our puppy desires to our friends at Owyheestar and got onto the waiting list!

Note the matching Collar/Leash that Elle got from Mom and Dad for Ace.  Orange and Volleyball themed.  There are pictures and toys for Elle to look at while she waits for her new puppy!


On Dec 9th, 2018 we saw that Winnie had delivered and we saw that there were a couple pups that met our hopes and sure enough Sheila gave us the news that one of those would go to us.  The excitement for the arrival of “Ace” began.

Elle’s best friend at school is about as excited as Elle and has been giving her one of these sheets every day in anticipation of Ace’s arrival.


Every Sunday it was a family event to look at the updates (pictures) from Shela on the TV and ohhhhh and ahhhh on how cute Ace (and the rest of the pups) were.

Charlie Mae and Murphy are like “YOU ARE BRINGING WHAT HOME ON FRIDAY??!?!!!” Hehe.. they will love him eventually I have no doubt, but we fully expect some initial shunning of him (especially from Charlie Mae who doesn’t really seem to like puppies).  Murphy will be more open initially, but I expect him to be “done” with him quickly and wish he would go back where he came from….


Well –the 3rd Owyheestar furry baby is home —already Facebook famous!  

This photo was taken early Sunday morning. Jill is a good sport and has a great morning looking–her and the puppy. It seems all that preparation paid off–good job Elle. We look forward to receiving your forthcoming updates.

Parvo Paranoia

~ Real or Imagined

Our Client Asked —

Luna not too long before she joined her family.

Is the Parvo virus threat just until they get through their 16 week Titler test? Or is it until they reach a certain age? Just a little unclear what constitutes them being safe for public areas/dog parks etc. If you get the titer test done at 16 weeks it will show if she has immunity to Parvo and if you also have her tested for the Distemper it would also show that. Last time we just tested for the Parvo because Distemper just is not something they are seeing in our area. 

OwyheeStar’s Response

Parvo is a very real risk. Ask any Vet office and they will tell you that the risk is out there, and it is beyond sad when a puppy comes in and they are determined infected. We have never had an OwyheeStar puppy diagnosed with Parvo. Nonetheless, even though nowhere in the Pacific NW is listed as a ‘Hot Spot’ we still need to exercise caution.

I think if you take your puppy for a walk in the neighborhood you should wipe the feet (not let them lick her paws) and make sure they are not investigating a lot of areas where the ground might be infected. In all likelihood, your local neighborhood (if it is a low traffic area) may be fairly safe.

So what do I mean by low traffic? A place less traveled by those with pups. Any area where people are taking random puppies (which might be unknowingly infected). It is understandable that the owner doesn’t yet have a clue. The pups begin shedding the virus long before there is a definitive sign that they are ill. So they are leaving behind the virus everywhere. Of course, they are infecting the ground. But did you know if you viewed this virus under the microscope that one end is barbed–it sticks to clothing, shoes, etc. It is very portable which makes the spread even more commonplace.

More Information

Here are a couple of links that talk about the prevalence of Parvo and how to avoid it—and while it sounds paranoid, you want to socialize the puppy BUT avoid risk.  

Parvo In Puppies

Parvo Virus in Dogs

Precautions

~We are extra careful

We always leave the pups in the car (when scheduled for the Veterinary Wellness) until the room is ready at the Vet office. It is essential to avoid exposure—to Parvo, Kennel Cough, etc. We never take a young dog that doesn’t have immunity to public places including pet stores (where well-meaning folks might share the virus) such a  Pet Store, Park, Dog Area, or even to socialize at the local Farm Store– etc.

The Vaccine Titer Test

Once the Titer test shows immunity (with a high titer count) you are good to go. We honestly believe if you follow our vaccine protocol you will attain protection. Then by getting the sixteen-week titer test (instead of the typical puppy shot) it is going to allow you to have the freedom to be anywhere. In the meantime though, visit friends homes in a fenced back yard—where pets are vaccinated, etc. Figure out ways to safely socialize your puppy–a hundred different touches in a hundred days would be a good goal. Do what you can–but be safe, my friend.

Expert Advice

~ We Do What we are able

Breeder Comment

Cliff and I get a lot of Email inquiries–most are from folks hoping we have a puppy that can make their dream come true. Others are from folks like Dale–seeking advice and making commentary on our blog. We cannot always offer the level of advice some need or expect. Recommendations are hard to give when we are not in the loop and time is limited; however, we do what we are able to do. In this situation, we shared the food we have used and some information about the Weimaraner and heart issues. We have not seen many cases –so relax. Nevertheless, there are plenty of things that can go wrong when it comes to health. We always recommend being as Holistic in your approach as possible. I have posted Dale’s note (with his permission)–maybe some of you can identify with Dale. We all can agree that the loss of our beloved Weimaraner is something inexplicable. There are no words to adequately describe our relationship and the hole they leave behind. It is best to focus on what they brought to our life–to count every day allotted a blessing.

From Dale

Hello Shela,  Your Owyheestar blog is the first email I open EVERY day.   And re-read.   And forward to friends and family.  I know it’s a lot of work keeping up with the blog, but know that you do a great job, and all these Weimaraner pix and stories warm a lot of hearts.    Although we adopted Duke, our Weim, at 1, we did not get him from you.  Though we will next time.  But this question is important to you and all your Weim lovers.   I stumbled upon your website a few months after we lost our beloved Weimaraner, Duke (below) at age 10.   He was a bullet running, swimming, hiking, playing until two weeks before he died of asymptomatic congestive heart failure and cardiomyopathy.   It’s been almost 8 months and I still can’t believe he’s gone.   Such a personality. I’d like to discuss your food recommendations.  I purchased what I researched as the best foods, mixing up flavors every month.   The brands were Origen, Acana and Zignature.  Mainly Acana.   They all had high protein levels (28%), and lots of fresh fruits and vegetables.   No grain.  He received 5 cups of food a day, mostly chicken, beef and fish, until shortly before he died.  One month after Duke died, research came out from Joshua Stern, UC Davis, that certain foods that were high in legumes, were linked to heart disease in several breeds that lack a genetic history of the ailment.  (Canine diluted cardiomyopathy CDM)  Apparently these expensive boutique foods had a taurine deficiency.  Meats have plenty of taurine, but legumes do not.   So the red flag is legumes listed in the first six ingredients of the food.   Also, chicken and beef are high in taurine, while many exotic meats such as lamb, rabbit and others, and legumes have little or none.  Research is ongoing, and I know that CDM happens in these big-hearted dogs like Weims, pointers, etc.  I don’t know if the food caused or contributed to Duke’s premature death, but given his excellent health, it is a possibility.   But have you heard anything?   And what foods do you recommend? Also, we’re wondering about getting another Weim at our age.   I’m 66, my husband is 68, and we’re not sure we can keep up and do justice to another Weim.   Any thoughts on this?  Thank you for all you do, Dale

Faces

Speak Volumes

Here I am wrinkled up face looking like I have an attitude.

I think we all read too much into a puppy’s face. Often people write they can tell a pup’s personality. For me–having seen so many over the decades, I tend to believe faces speak volumes–but mostly humans react to what they see. (Haha) Honestly, some of the best temperament ones might have smushed up face that looked like they have their mad-on. Can I suggest that they have not quite grown into their face?

This speaks of happiness, doesn’t it?

This makes us laugh!

At Two Days
At One Day

The mouse-sized newborn Weimaraner puppy leaves us breathless–always. We never tire of seeing them come into the world–wondering what will become. We hope that everyone has the best possible life.

Grace & Bella Rae

              “Shela and Cliff — I made it to New Hampshire”

After a flight recovery day(flight went smooth and easy, no issues) everyone tired but now settling into day to day….Grace and Bella Rae are totally bonded❤️

Breeder Comment

You might remember that yesterday’s blog featured Roger and CW–they flew to Salt Lake City. Yes, we get quite a few folks that fly with their Weimaraner puppy. Nonetheless, it is getting more difficult to make these kinds of flights happen. Smaller planes and different carry-on criteria are the reason it is not as easy as it once was. Nonetheless, here are two families who were able to pull it off.

Why fly, you might ask. Well–in many cases, it is the best option. A road trip is not always in the best interest of the puppy. Nor, is it in many cases the best way to start–get the routine going to ensure you are on the right track. The road trip means you have the concern of where to potty your puppy–it is essential to be extremely careful. Parvo has most likely infected every roadside potty area–read up on this dreadful situation, and you will agree. Being very careful is essential. Every year, more pups are lost to this disease than you can imagine. I hold my breath as I write we have never lost an OwyheeStar to Parvo. We want to keep this way.

Another perk with the carry-on experience might not be as evident. People who fly must get their puppy to settle in the travel bag. If you can teach a puppy to settle–you can teach them anything. It is also a great time to bond. There is something about the travel experience of this sort–it sets you up for an extraordinary transition.

Athena

~She is adjusting well

Here is a story I thought you would appreciate. Saturday me and My girlfriend Samantha took our puppy to Lowe’s to get some supplies and ran into a gentleman (the name I forgot) who have a beautiful almost 2-year-old blue male Weimaraner named Kota (Dakota) I’m assuming? 


He explained he got his dog from you as well and that he got one of the blue males from the same litter as our little girl! Small world! Meanwhile, Athena is having a lot of good experiences beyond the crate training I mentioned last time we spoke.

Also, this link (click here) might be of interest as I am sure she was the main reason we made the news! 2 segments at that! 

Breeder Comment

Hey Nick–we appreciate the cute photos. We are glad that you were able to connect again with Koda’s & Mylo’s family–I am sure you have a playdate in the works. Maybe you didn’t realize it, but yesterday’s blog featured the two Blue boys belonging to the gentleman you met at Lowes.

We hope you will stay in touch–and that your training continues to unfold in an excellent manner. Thanks ever so much for this lovely update.

Milly

At Sixteen Weeks

     ~We can Report

image2
I wanted to give you a quick Milly update.  She is 16 weeks old today and weighing in at 28lbs.  I’m so curious as to how big she will be, how large was her mom?  She is such a sweet girl with the perfect amount of spunk!  image4
She is patient (mostly 😉) with the kiddos and is such a quick learner!  The piranha syndrome is slowing down a bit too which is great.  She has taken to her crate like a champ and enjoys most everyone we meet, person or dog.
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We have been working with her on pheasant scent and a wing and she has a beautiful point! I have included a picture of her pointing below.  We plan to expose her to some live birds soon.
image1
She had her titer test today in lieu of the 16-week vaccine and her vet says he predicts she will have good numbers!  Thank you for such a wonderful pup!  All your hard work is evident!  We had such an amazing experience with our last Weim, I was worried I would never have such a wonderful experience again.  Milly is proving that she is up to the challenge of taking over where her predecessor left off!

Breeder Comment

~and your answer

How large is Bernie? Bernie is smaller than a lot of Weimaraners–she has the more compact body style. I cannot be sure, but a good guess is she weighs around 55 lbs
I must say—I find this the most obnoxious thing about the Weimaraner puppy—the mouthing and biting. Even though it is shark-like (despite what some folks think), it is not aggression. They are a very mouthing-type of a puppy—possibly the worst of all.

How delightful it is to have an engaging and friendly Weimaraner. Not every Weim welcomes those outside their inner circle.

You folks are doing fabulous with her.  Thank you, for doing the titer test instead of automatically doing a 16-week puppy shot. And for staying on top of other things as well. Once they arrive, the work begins afresh. Thank you, for all you are doing and have done with her. I am excited to hear more in the future.

Meet Sana

So It Begins

  ~ Let the Spoiling Commence

Sana is doing great. She is settled and happy. She loves playing in her yard and snuggling. She is an amazing retriever. She is so kind and loving. Dad is thrilled. He said she is going to be his most spoiled dog ever! Lol. Thanks again.
~Crystal

Breeder Comment

We are happy to know Sana is adjusting well–as that she delights everyone. We look forward to hearing about he antics and the story unfolds. Thanks ever so much!

Predictions

When Someone Asks 

     ~Us to Predict the Future 

Hello! As I have shared from the heart and soul of OwyheeStar, we cannot predict how these things will unfold. I need to update this post from May on Availability–Click Here to read it. Skip the actual puppy talk and go right to the meat of the article. It discusses all the reasons it is virtually impossible for us to us to guess what, when, or how things will develop. I think of it as inexplicable craziness.

The Weimar can express our feelings in ways we cannot imagine. Here is how I feel when asked more than once to make such a prediction.

 

Well, I do understand the need to know. The desire to plan. The utter urgency created by the Weimaraner Puppy Frenzy Virus. Nevertheless, it is like most viral infections. It has to work it’s way out and eventually–we all feel a whole lot better. Wishing you laughter and Weimar antics as soon as it is possible. Love to you!

Availability

What Is the Most Frequent Inquiry?

Bernie X Boone Babies Wk 4-7

You know the answer to that question. It is about the current availability for our puppies. I pasted in the information I shared not that long ago about how things work. It is not as people imagine. Regardless, I wanted to drop a universal message that we have a couple of males that are not yet promised.

I am not frantic–this type of thing always shakes out as it is meant to be and I have not said much for several reasons. One—we have been insanely busy with the pups, the garden, the farm, and life in general. You understand I am confident your life is similar. Secondly, we only want the right type of inquiry. On the car lot, you have tire kickers–those who spend a lot of time but never are going to buy a car from you. Here, we have puppy-crazed folks who are either looking for the perfect pup and maybe their ideas are off the chart or those who are in love with the idea but they know they are not getting a pup. They can fill out the application and write me somewhere between 50-100 times. They are not willing to invest a small amount to get on our Wait List–that is a clue.

We have a Wait List that leans toward the female. That will color the future availability. Of course, as you read on you will discover we don’t have a clue how things will shake out. What if we get an entire litter of females? It has happened. Then too, what if we get mostly males–we won’t have a pup for these folks. We do have quite a few families who might favor the female, but they are willing to accept a male if that is what they can get. That kind of situations is more natural (and tends to work best of all) because we have so little control over the situation.

Please skip to the bottom to read about our Spring 2018 Status if you read this explanation before. If not, please consider investing the time to understand our situation. Thank you!

Inexplicable Craziness

The inexplicable craziness associated with raising the Weimaraner cannot be precisely defined. Nonetheless, we would like to shed some light on things from our side of the fence. We understand that many folks who come to us in search of the Weimaraner have waited until the eleventh hour and now they are in the hope of finding a pup sooner rather than later. On a rare occasion, we might see ourselves with an available pup upon your inquiry. This scenario could happen if the folks on the wait list are not ready (have a different timeline). There are the other factors too–the sex, the coat color, and the coat length to mention the three biggies. Also, for example, some folks want to hunt upland game, truffles, or sheds. We are looking for the Weims with the most hunt-potential for those engaged in hunting. During our Discovery and Placement Test process, we ascertain whether the pup is more inclined towards scent, and other cues. That doesn’t mean the less hunt-potential pup could not be a suitable hunting companion; however, we hope to place those pups with the Companion Weim folks. Other than the Weim-seeker’s preferences, availability and litters are affected by factors we often have little to no control over.

Heat Cycles

The female’s heat cycle might not be entirely consistent. Certain age-appropriate females will come into season every six months–others not so much. We figure on average any female might cycle about every seven months; however, there are times when our best guess is off. Last winter, for example, all the girls came into heat way behind schedule despite the chagrin of many. The lateness caused the arrival we got to be later and for some people, this time change was not going to work.

Mating Complexities

The complexity of mating cannot be understated. There is a reason we have more than one sire–we don’t keep breeding back to the same lineage. The right sire choice is essential. In some situations, we have had the luxury to use multiple sires; however, many times we have but one option. Or, where we have mixed in the Longhairs, we might have one option if we don’t want any Longhair pups in a litter. For example, Boone doesn’t carry the Longhair DNA marker–whereas, Stackhouse is a Longhair. Any female that carries the Longhair marker and is mated to Stackhouse would produce some Longhair pups. All this planning doesn’t always end up producing a litter.

When You Get Nothing

There are times when a mating happens, and it doesn’t produce pups. We suspect this happens a lot more than anyone talks about because we get inquiries from folks who have waited elsewhere and after two matings they never got a puppy. We also know, as we talked about with the four (from the Callie X Zee litter), not every female is a good producer. Vidalia never produced a single pup despite many efforts. Ginger and Cindee inconsistently produced small litters. Only Mousse produced the average-sized litter consistently. Who would have guessed? The lack of litters from a mating thing is not the end of the challenges.

To list a few other things–some females do not carry the litter to term. You watch their tummy grow, and they miscarry. Yes, it happens to the Weimaraner just as it does to some women. Or the litter might only produce one or two pups. All that time spent hoping, and you have not much to show for it. Those folks waiting for a puppy can become disillusioned. We can experience these feelings too! We have to shake off anything negative quickly. After waiting, and the pups arrive new information is available. Sometimes it is not as we hoped.

Spring 2018

7-Bernie X Boone 2018 Wk4We have the pups–but possibly not what some wanted. You know, the silver-gray female is the most popular choice at this point in time. Many times in the past, we have had a lot of silver-gray females born and everyone seemed to want a blue or a male. We cannot just mate endlessly. We have to have homes for pups–so there is a limit to what we can do. This applies to the workload as well as the placement process. We (Cliff and I) wanted to make you aware that if you are thinking of getting a male, we might have one available very shortly. If you are serious, we would love to hear from you.