Category Archives: Raising Versatile Hunting Weims

Colorado OwyheeStar

~Office Help

All is well.  All systems are working and we have had only one accident (my fault), otherwise, she’s going outside regularly. She does well at the office and actually asked to go out!

P.S. please put me down for a blue female with the tail.  Let me know when I need to send a deposit.

Breeder Comment

First, we want to thank Steve for being such a fantastic Weimlover. Now, some of you might wonder he what he means when he says, “with a tail.” Don’t all Weims have a tail? Yes, they do.

Steve means he wants an undocked tail on his next pup–which is what this one has by request. We have a particular protocol we follow for this type of request. For one thing, the deposit is sizeable–because if the person happens to walk away, then finding another home for the pup is an arduous task. It can be done, but it requires a lot of extra work. Therefore, we need more to get on the Wait List for the undocked tail, as well as to reserve such a puppy. Once the decision has been made, as about one-week, then docking the tail also becomes more involved.

Kimber

~ Smart and Playful

Hey there,

Charlie and I just wanted to give you an update on our Kimber girl!

She’s doing amazing. She is so smart and playful. We are really starting to see her personality come through! She also loves the snow. Thanks again for such a great pup.


Hope all is well!-Alix & Charlie

We are happy to hear that Kimber is doing well. It looks like you got the snow, too. (Haha) Thanks for the great pictures and the positive news.

Athena

~She is adjusting well

Here is a story I thought you would appreciate. Saturday me and My girlfriend Samantha took our puppy to Lowe’s to get some supplies and ran into a gentleman (the name I forgot) who have a beautiful almost 2-year-old blue male Weimaraner named Kota (Dakota) I’m assuming? 


He explained he got his dog from you as well and that he got one of the blue males from the same litter as our little girl! Small world! Meanwhile, Athena is having a lot of good experiences beyond the crate training I mentioned last time we spoke.

Also, this link (click here) might be of interest as I am sure she was the main reason we made the news! 2 segments at that! 

Breeder Comment

Hey Nick–we appreciate the cute photos. We are glad that you were able to connect again with Koda’s & Mylo’s family–I am sure you have a playdate in the works. Maybe you didn’t realize it, but yesterday’s blog featured the two Blue boys belonging to the gentleman you met at Lowes.

We hope you will stay in touch–and that your training continues to unfold in an excellent manner. Thanks ever so much for this lovely update.

Seven Steps to Success

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Note: This is a repost of an article we have shared several times. Our pups are ready to acclimate to their new environment upon arrival. We recommend not over-thinking at the early stages.

  1. Be committed — Commitment to the process is primary. Training your pup will take time. Think of this as a journey (a road trip) with a destination in mind. Don’t set timelines; instead, take this adventure together. It will take as long as it takes for each achievement. Sometimes just when you think, you have arrived; your Weimaraner will hit a snag or transitional phase. There are many of these stages in the first couple of years. As with an adolescent, they can be going along well and suddenly regress. Please take this in stride it is nothing personal. The first occurrence could well be prior to week twelve. Stay calm and move ahead–this is how to avoid ingraining fear or some unwanted behavior.
  2. Keep your eye on the young puppy at all times—This is vitally important for at least the first 2-3 weeks, or until you have the housebreaking part accomplished. Use a crate, bag, or soft-side crate to confine the pup when you cannot be vigilant. The crate should not be too large. If it is more than they need they may select one end for a potty area.
  3. Be consistent–Do everything in the same manner! For example, the pup wakes up and stirs. At first, you would pick them up and carry them out to the area where you want them to go potty. Each time you see them circling or rousing from a nap go to the potty-area. If you use the bells hung at the door, then ring them as you go out the door. Soon they will be ringing the bells as a signal for you to open the door.
  4. Keep it simple — Although your pup can learn amazing things, it is best to do a few simple things and build upon those experiences. The process will unfold naturally if you allow it to do so; start with getting them to come. Although they all follow and come to us, it is different once they start to mature. Do the hallway exercise (5-7 retrieves each night). By using a hallway (with adjoining doors closed) there is nowhere for them to escape with the toy, ball, or dummy. Some people treat them when they bring the item to their hand. It is not necessary. The activity is a reward in and of itself. Have a couple of bumpers or toys (designated for this activity). Make it an event every day until you move to the yard because you have compliance.
  5. Keep it fun — Weimaraners are brilliant and learn quickly. A trainer might tell you to work for an hour and even a half hour doing one exercise every night, but we suggest ten minutes. Do it for ten minutes and then do something fun. This approach works for us! If your Weim pup loses interest, you lose ground in the training process.
  6. Remember it is about your relationship — No matter what you are doing it is important to remember that Weims are all about relationship. If they get their feelings hurt, things can go sour quickly. Your bonding experience is vital to the success of this relationship. Take time to think and see things from their perspective. You are the center of their world. They not only want to control you, but they want to own you. Weimaraners are the ultimate Velcro dog and must learn how to stay alone. Your relationship is a double-edged sword. They need a lot of time, attention, and affection. They also need to find ways to cope when you are absent. We recommend starting this process very early, or they will come to expect you will be there 24 X 7. Separation anxiety can be a huge issue in this breed.
  7. Be patient — When you go out to teach your pup a skill, make sure it is a learn-able task. Plan enough time to accomplish the task–but keep your training focused to ten to twenty minutes maximum. The short bursts of success are more effective than lengthy sessions. Your attitude and demeanor play into the equation too! If you are feeling stressed, forego training your Weimaraner. There are many methods of training. Nevertheless, choose one that enhances your bonding experience and one that creates a respectful environment for all concerned.

The best Weimaraner people are those that are natural leaders. Anytime you feel your relationship is stressed then you are going down the wrong road. The persons that are neither too strict nor too lenient are usually, the ones that excel. Regardless of what happens, it is always best to pro-active than to be reactive. Stay calm. Keep it simple. Get results. Plan little steps of learning and build upon them. Try our 7 steps to Success, and we believe you will be on the right path.

Wishing you fewer puppy bites and more puppy kisses

One Last Love before he leaves…..

~ Shela and Cliff

Looking For Birds

Our Koda

     ~Out and About Together

This looks interesting

It’s been a while since we checked in so I thought I’d send you a few pictures of Koda.  We went out mainly for exercise but also to see if he could stir up any birds. 

We covered a lot of distance but unfortunately, the only thing flying was a few geese that came into a pond we were circling.  Koda sure had a great time sniffing around and I think he’d do well but I guess we’ll have to wait and see.

Breeder Comment

Thank you, we appreciate the update. Koda looks the part–and genetically he would have excellent potential. Both Stackhouse, as well as Sadie, are proven hunters. Of course, it takes a knack to hone the field skills–once they get the idea, it should be fun for the hunter and the companion Weimar, too!

Birdy Girl

First Hunt

     ~For Milly

Nose Working — On Point!

Just wanted to share some pics from Milly’s first hunts as requested.  Her first hunt was at a release sight, and she did fantastic.  Pointed a few, didn’t range too far and listened well.  She had her first wild bird hunt this weekend and did amazing.  Pointed several birds, worked methodically, and most importantly had a blast.  

Look What We Got Today

Chris and two others hunted behind her and both couldn’t believe how well she performed, especially for being so young. Chris and his hunting companions are looking forward to many more hunts behind this extremely birdy girl! 😊

Breeder Comment

We are happy to get this update with the photos. Thank you, ever so much for taking the time and effort to record her first hunt. You are off to a fabulous start. We could not be happier. Go, Milly!

Macy

First Hunt

     ~Birds are Great

First time out hunting with Macy today she did great. She was a little slow at the start but picked it up and had a great day. Very proud Poppa. Thank you so much.

Around Home

Yes, Indeed, I still have to share her with my son. They are still the best of friends–which is a good thing. She is very well behaved outside can’t say the same for the inside. She loves the food that she thinks we leave for her on the counter.

Breeder Comment

We are happy to hear that Macy is in the field successfully. We love to get hunt testimonials. Bernie is an excellent hunter. Boone comes from solid working hunt lines–but he has not had as many opportunities to hunt as Bernie. The offspring have proven to be excellent hunting companions. Thanks for remembering us, Don.

We also appreciate your loyalty. It has been a long time as well as a long distance relationship. Of course, the fact that you had to fly to the West Coast and somehow this all converged was outstanding.

Reporting

From Southern California

     ~It’s Style

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We are doing well. She has quite the temper and will let you know if she doesn’t like something. We are working at getting past the sharp puppy teeth thing. She is going to be a Sharp Hunter.

All Tuckered Out

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Breeder Comment

We are happy to hear that you are doing well with Style. We look forward to hearing about her future training and exploits. Thanks for thinking of us.

Our Milly

At 6.5 Months

Just wanted to send you a quick update on Milly (Bernie and Boone 18 litter).  She is 6.5 months old now, wow where did time go? She is such a joy and we fall more in love with her every day.  She is in level 4 (out of 4) in obedience training on her way to getting her canine good citizenship certificate.  She does so well in class and we are working hard to enforce all her commands into everyday life.  She is still growing like a weed and I believe is now around 45lbs.  We love this spunky, smart, cuddly girl so much!  Here are some recent photos!
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(Milly and her Weim “cousin” Sky are best of friends)
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(She is learning to enjoy playing in the rain, she’s a Seattle girl after all! This has taken much coercion but she’s getting used to it)
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(Sometimes she thinks she is a cat! Notice her blanket which is spread out that she chose to ignore)
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(She has daddy wrapped around her finger)
Thanks again for a wonderful pup!
Deanna

Breeder’s Comment

Thank you, for your investment in Milly–the work, the training, and all that has gone into her ongoing development. Anyone who has raised the Weimaraner knows the joy and the challenges. Like Milly–there is no dropping the ball. (Haha)
It was great to see you connected with Luna’s family on Facebook. We were happy to hear you plan to get Milly on birds too. All the obedience work will pay dividends in the field–and forward on every level. Again, we appreciate you Emailing us this update.

Our Luna

Personality Plus

    and my hunting partner

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As promised we wanted to keep in touch with our pup Luna from Lynnwood, WA. She just passed the 5 month mark and she is doing great. When she runs out her energy she’s so sweet but has lots of personality — which we just love. She’s been well socialized around other dogs and people and loves her daily walks and trips to the dog park.

But what I’m enjoying most of all is her as a bird hunting partner. I had taken it slow with her over the summer: introducing her to guns and quail and big open fields so I didn’t know what to expect when her and I did our first pheasant hunt (DNR planted birds in western WA). But wow was I impressed with her prey drive and stellar nose! And she’s not gun-shy! First, she gets super excited when she knows we’re going out, and for as young as she is, works the fields hard bounding all over the place in grass way over her head. Then when I’ve knocked down a bird in some heavy cover I was nervous we wouldn’t find it to reward her with. But wow was I surprised when she used her nose and tracked it down! – she wasn’t even 5 months yet. She doesn’t point or retrieve yet (obviously) but we’ll work on that next year. I hope to get her into the local NAVDHA club next year too.

So, all in all, we’re doing great and loving life. Hope you enjoy the photos.
All the best,
Mike and Michelle

Breeder Comment

We are thrilled to hear from you. It is great to find out that Luna is doing well. Thanks for all the hard work — we realize that pups take work. We truly appreciate you sharing about the field work–she is coming along quite nicely.

We recommend joining the International NAVHDA (North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association) because to participate in the local chapter you have to join anyhow. There are some nice perks such as their magazine. It is always essential to keep in mind that pups can be no older than sixteen-months for the NAVHDA Natural Ability Hunt Test. It takes some planning and preparation. Typically, you want to enroll in the spring test early to get a slot. So, it is advisable to keep apprised of the scheduling, because slots fill quickly.

Zula Blue retired–she has been such an excellent addition to our breeding program. We kept her as a pup from two of our lineages. It turned out well. Since her retirement, she has joined Marie and Pushkin in Western Oregon. She is affectionately known as Zoo Boo. Maybe you noticed she had been featured on the blog a couple of times.