Category Archives: Training

Lapdog

What Does Your Weim Do?

 

Ari the Lap Dog_4490018248684979043_n

Ari is a Lap Weim and  very clever at trying to run the show

 

 

We who love the breed know they are the ultimate velcro dog. This attribute can work against us; however, most Weimlovers are addicted to this trait. New to the Weimaraner–you might be shocked at a large breed being this clingy. They are also prone to separation anxiety.

How This Works

When present you are their security blanket. When their humans are absent, the unprepared Weimaraner may freak out. All too many have ended up in rescue or a shelter because unaware admirers acquired them only to discover they couldn’t live with them. Not understanding the separation anxiety lead to unearned freedom and coming home to destruction. It might be your favorite shoes. The sofa arm by the front window or the carpet might be the target of the Weim’s reaction to feeling abandoned. The arm-missing-castoff-sofas greet the unsuspecting returning owner. Most often the human counterpart is perplexed. They might have had a Weim before that didn’t behave like this; however, in this instance, something went awry. Your absence causes them to act out–typically chewing up something to relieve their stress. They fear you will not return to them. You forgot them. The amount of destruction can vary. Sometimes the Weimaraner can escape the environment and give chase looking for you–desperate to find you. The last scenario has ended in a loss more times than you can imagine.

Twists and Turns

 

Griffin's Zeus and Ari Mess

Ari and Zeus made this mess for fun

Separation anxiety can take other forms. Some Weims sulk and then chew because they are upset with you. Nevertheless, they might withhold their love and refuse to even look at you. When your response is heartbrokenness and trying to win back their affection, they have the upper paw. Now, they can expand their toolbox with extreme manipulation. So, they can chew to relieve stress. They can chew because it has become a habit. They can chew to punish you. For those who are less committed, you can see how this can spin out of control.

 

Spiraling Out of Control

When coupled with incessant barking (and your neighbors are reporting you to the police) the destructive Weimaraner soon becomes abhorrent. People imagine that they would never dump their Weim at a shelter. Unfortunately, it happens too often. Therefore, our application process looks to discover the potential for failure with the breed as well as to gather the vital information necessary. Someone who is offended by us wanting the information may look elsewhere for their Weimaraner. It has to be that way. There are too many ways things can go awry–even for the most dog savvy person.

 

 

Last of Summer

Not Long Ago

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The Weimaraner is going to love the water if they feel at home in and on it. Tikka and Bill are off to a great start together. garins-sup-4Big Sister ( Luna) does the Standup Paddle Board too! When watersports are something you love and want to share with the Weimaraner the introduction to water is essential.

Achieving the water retrieve might take patience. Some Weims are more natural swimmers than other. Nonetheless, they all have webbed toes and can become proficient swimmers. garins-luna-nails

Luna Sets the Standard

Tikka has a lot to learn, and Luna will be sharing the inside secrets. Nail grooming is key to being girlie. Other tips are important to such as how to cover up properly. The undercover Weim-mode is crucial to the Weimar person.Garin under-cover1

Trigger

My Versatile Hunting Weim

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I just wanted to take a minute and tell you a little bit about my weim. He has been a ball of joy since day one! He is my best friend, and we literally do everything together. And he gets so bummed if he doesn’t get to go with me when I leave, for something like school or work.
23231453_10156136166669411_7213260034136713095_nFrom a little puppy, I worked with him to become the amazing hunting buddy he is today. I’ve trained a couple of dogs before, and none of them were so coachable as him. He’s not perfect, but we are still in some of the training. By next summer he should be on point!!! He has an amazing nose, and I’m amazed by what he’ll find.
He is always happy and loves to go for rides in the truck, bed or in the cab with the windows down. And he starts whining like crazy when we’re getting close to our hunting spots outta excitement.you can tell hunting is in his blood, he’s all smiles and joy when out in the blind, he watches all the birds flying and starts to wag his tail like crazy when they start coming in.
He does an amazing job at retrieving and pointing on birds, he does great in water and loves to be outdoors. He loves hunting!! 4:30 in the morning he’s up and pumped to go hunting and has plenty of energy to hunt all day but when we get home, and its time for bed, he jumps on my bed and turns into a snuggleball and take up most of my bed but I love it.
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He has been the best hunting dog, truck passenger, Saturday explorer and most importantly, my best friend. And I’d like to thank you so much for everything you’ve done over at Owyhee Star. You’re my number one choice when getting a dog and always be!! Everyone asks where I got such a beautiful dog and Owyhee Star’s the answer!! Thank you again so much!!

Breeder Comment

We are thrilled to learn that Trigger is a great Versatile Hunting Dog. Thank you, for the endorsement. It means the world to us. Most of our business comes from repeats or referrals.
Dear Readers, can we ask you a favor. This young man has an incredible business. If you know a serious Waterfowl Hunter, here is a great idea for Christmas. Order a custom duck or goose call from Hunter’s business — Northern Custom Calls.

Berkley

Peck's Berkley_660
Berkley is having fun in the leaves!

Growing, Learning, and a lot of Fun!

 

Berkley is growing like a weed. Sometimes we call her “bean stalk” because she is growing so fast.

She’s learning more and more every day and we are enjoying her so very much. She is sweet with a twist of feistiness!

Berkley and Our DaughtersPeck's Berkley_987

Berkley is excited about learning Latin along with our daughters.
Peck's Berkley_144726Then, she is showing off her ability to heel alongside our 7-year-old. We use the Starmark Collar you recommend on your website and taught our girls how to use it properly.
Until next time,
Amanda

Breeder Comment

We are delighted to learn that things are going well with Berkley. It is great she is such an integral part of the family. Then too–it is beyond surprising that she is heeling for your 7-year-old daughter. Many of our adults (write us) that they are unable to achieve the loose-leash heel. When you understand how to use that collar, and it is used (correctly) a lot of good things can happen.

We sincerely appreciate you thinking of us and sharing a window into your life with Berkley. Keep up the consistent effort and things will continue to move forward positively.

The 7 Steps To Success

OwyheeStar Recommends

22137020_10213771625108142_1638204146398558713_oNote: This is a repost of an article we have shared several times. Our pups are ready to acclimate to their new environment upon arrival. We recommend not over-thinking at the early stages.

  1. Be committed — Commitment to the process is primary. Training your pup will take time. Think of this as a journey (a road trip) with a destination in mind. Don’t set timelines; instead, take this adventure together. It will take as long as it takes for each achievement. Sometimes just when you think, you have arrived; your Weimaraner will hit a snag or transitional phase. There are many of these stages in the first couple of years. As with an adolescent, they can be going along well and suddenly regress. Please take this in stride it is nothing personal. The first occurrence could well be prior to week twelve. Stay calm and move ahead–this is how to avoid ingraining fear or some unwanted behavior.
  2. Keep your eye on the young puppy at all times—This is vitally important for at least the first 2-3 weeks, or until you have the housebreaking part accomplished. Use a crate, bag, or soft-side crate to confine the pup when you cannot be vigilant. The crate should not be too large. If it is more than they need they may select one end for a potty area.
  3. Be consistent–Do everything in the same manner! For example, the pup wakes up and stirs. At first, you would pick them up and carry them out to the area where you want them to go potty. Each time you see them circling or rousing from a nap go to the potty-area. If you use the bells hung at the door, then ring them as you go out the door. Soon they will be ringing the bells as a signal for you to open the door.
  4. Keep it simple — Although your pup can learn amazing things, it is best to do a few simple things and build upon those experiences. The process will unfold naturally if you allow it to do so; start with getting them to come. Although they all follow and come to us, it is different once they start to mature. Do the hallway exercise (5-7 retrieves each night). By using a hallway (with adjoining doors closed) there is nowhere for them to escape with the toy, ball, or dummy. Some people treat them when they bring the item to their hand. It is not necessary. The activity is a reward in and of itself. Have a couple of bumpers or toys (designated for this activity). Make it an event every day until you move to the yard because you have compliance.
  5. Keep it fun — Weimaraners are brilliant and learn quickly. A trainer might tell you to work for an hour and even a half hour doing one exercise every night, but we suggest ten minutes. Do it for ten minutes and then do something fun. This approach works for us! If your Weim pup loses interest, you lose ground in the training process.
  6. Remember it is about your relationship — No matter what you are doing it is important to remember that Weims are all about relationship. If they get their feelings hurt, things can go sour quickly. Your bonding experience is vital to the success of this relationship. Take time to think and see things from their perspective. You are the center of their world. They not only want to control you, but they want to own you. Weimaraners are the ultimate Velcro dog and must learn how to stay alone. Your relationship is a double-edged sword. They need a lot of time, attention, and affection. They also need to find ways to cope when you are absent. We recommend starting this process very early, or they will come to expect you will be there 24 X 7. Separation anxiety can be a huge issue in this breed.
  7. Be patient — When you go out to teach your pup a skill, make sure it is a learn-able task. Plan enough time to accomplish the task–but keep your training focused to ten to twenty minutes maximum. The short bursts of success are more effective than lengthy sessions. Your attitude and demeanor play into the equation too! If you are feeling stressed, forego training your Weimaraner. There are many methods of training. Nevertheless, choose one that enhances your bonding experience and one that creates a respectful environment for all concerned.

The best Weimaraner people are those that are natural leaders. Anytime you feel your relationship is stressed then you are going down the wrong road. The persons that are neither too strict nor too lenient are usually, the ones that excel. Regardless of what happens, it is always best to pro-active than to be reactive. Stay calm. Keep it simple. Get results. Plan little steps of learning and build upon them. Try our 7 steps to Success, and we believe you will be on the right path.

Wishing you fewer puppy bites and more puppy kisses

~ Shela and Cliff

Gone Right

The More Invested Family

          ~A Move Worth Making

Breeder CommentTaun’s new family is OwyheeStar Vetted, and they await the next (OwyheeStar) fur family members arrival sometime early 2018
Kilroy's Taun_0987

Laura and Taun

Jon Writes-

We now have Taun, a 5-year-old (Topper x Blue) Weimaraner pup. Having him with us floods our life with all the wonderful memories from our beloved Nadja (a former Weimaraner girl whose life was cut way short). Our family returns to life with the Weimaraner at the arrival of Taun. This breed has very distinct personality traits that no other breed we’ve owned or met duplicates. They are not for everyone, but that’s OK.

This joyous happening of Taun joining our family occurred by chance. My wife who is related to Chris was in Oregon visiting her Dad when she met Taun. It turns out, Chris and Freddy are moving, and it was not going to be the best situation for an energetic dog like Taun.

For the joy and the fun of it, Laura took him on a few walks and spent a fair bit of time with him while she was out there. When she was asked if we would be open to bringing Taun home, it didn’t take but a second to decide. We are delighted to have him in our household.

Laura shares (Jon’s significant other) as well as the loving new mom of Taun.

I wanted to introduce myself and say how incredibly wonderful fate sometimes works, i.e., Taking Taun was the bestest decision ever. It feels now as though he’s always been a part of our family.  He settled in nicely–we have added a fair amount of structure from the start, so he knew what to expect from day to day after the big transition.  I love your blog from Taun’s perspective and seems pretty right on.

What I love about Taun:  He’s a family dog, he’s happiest when he can be with any one of us, but he’s ok when no one is home (for short periods of time). He doesn’t appear to have been anxious, seems to nap on any one of his many dog beds. Nevertheless, upon our arrival, he is quick to greet us with his sleepy face. He often sleeps in our daughter’s room, but every so often he sleeps in our room.  He just likes to be near one of us when we’re home.  He may never be an off-leash dog, but when we move to the bigger farm we will work on that, as for now, he walks every morning and evening (round trip 2.2 miles twice daily) to the barn to take care of horses.  He’s an awesome communicator as far as needing to go out and when we’re behind schedule with breakfast/dinner.  He has an abundance of enduring expressions, as Weim’s do!

Kilroy's Taun_2585

Barn dog riding shotgun in the golf cart on way to feed lunch hay to horses

On the walk to the barn this morning Jon and I discussed the new puppy, and although it’s hard not to jump right in, we want to be settled into the new property and to have more time to devote to the needs of a new brother……Hence, Jon’s and I discussed when/who that happens.  Jon filled in application male or female but I think we’d prefer another male, boys will be boys, and I’m also opting for another Blue.  I had never seen a Blue till I met Taun and I/we do love his coloring, so if that’s

I understand that Tauns parents have been retired, but something akin to those personality traits is what we are looking for.

Kilroy's Taun Helping Dad Work1

Taun keeping Jon company while he works at the computer.

Thank you for what you do, bringing wonderful Weim’s into the world and look forward to working with you toward expanding our family.

 

A Few comments about our Nadja

We had a Weim a few years back that broke our heart. Nadja had the extreme misfortune to develop severe degenerative disc disease at an early age. By the age of 5, she had deteriorated to the point that she was in severe pain and essentially paralyzed in her back end. I made the decision to put her down, and it was one of the bleakest days of my life. I had raised her from a poop-covered pup, and she was a very special dog. She never needed a leash except for her own safety. We could be anywhere, and all I had to say was, “Nadja, come.” and she would race to my left side and sit waiting for me to say, “OK,” before bounding off again. The loss was heartbreaking, but we could not continue on without a Weimaraner or two forever. We will never forget our Nadja.

Breeder Comment

It has been a while since we received these emailed tidbits about Taun. He continues to settle into his new life and family. He has an ever-expanding role. Here are two more photos of him that speak volumes.

 

Kilroy's Taun Tractor1

Taun is now ‘The Tractor Operator’

 

Kilroy's Taun Study Budy

 Taun is such a part of our family now and so settled in.  
Grace’s study buddy

 

 

Berkley

Off to A Good Start

We love our Berkley. You chose well!!

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Here’s an update on CRATE TRAINING:

She was totally content in her crate for the 4-hour ride home from Oregon. We stopped once and she went potty. Her first night home, she was not happy at all to be away from her litter mates and her mama. We put her crate in our room so she could see us, but she still howled and whined much of the night. Yesterday we put her in her crate several times, for 20-45 minutes each time, during the day while we ate our meals and ran an errand. She was a little vocal about it each time but got better as the day progressed. We hosted a lunch event and a dinner event, and she did splendid meeting and greeting all the shoe-less guests (parvo precautionary rule). She was the absolute center of attention for a good chunk of the day. When it was time for bed last night we put her in her crate and she went right to sleep. Not one howl or yelp! She stirred at 2 am and gave me a little whimper. I took her outside and she went potty right away. She went back to sleep in her crate until almost 6 am, which is my wake-up time anyway! We were so thrilled and gave her lots of praise for doing such a good job.

An update on POTTY TRAINING:

We used the bell method with our first Weim, and it worked like a champ. So we knew this was the way to go the second time around. Every time we take her outside to go potty (after she eats, wakes up, just before bed or crate time, or every 30 minutes or so), we take her little paws and ring that bell and say “outside”. Yesterday she rang the bell all on her own. We took her out and she went potty right away. Then again today, she rang the bell on her own, and the same thing happened!!! She is catching on so fast. We haven’t had to clean up after any accidents. I am shocked.

An update on TRAINING AND LIFE IN GENERAL:

She is retrieving like a champ to our hand….stuffed toys, mostly. She isn’t into the balls yet for some reason. She is coming on command and just starting to get “sit”. I started working with her on heeling as well, but that’s a little trickier. She is starting to get it, but barely. Berkley went with us to take big sister to school for her first day of school today. And then she snuggled on the couch with us and listened in as I read a Sofia the First story to our youngest. She’s one fun pup. I attached a few pictures.

Thanks so much, Amanda

Breeder Comment

It was very sweet of you to update us on Berkley. We appreciate the follow through you are doing too! It is paying off. Yes, we try to set the pups up for success, but it takes more than a little knack to step quickly toward success.

The potty training is excellent. I love that you used the bell system. Around here that would not work, but in a traditional family setting it can get you off to a good start fast. Be sure to get a fecal exam. Giardia and coccidia are common one-celled parasites that can quickly multiply and reek havoc on the pup’s intestine. Treatment isn’t a big deal if you catch it early. Pups prefer puddle water, and they also lick their feet all the time. These are great ways to ingest something that can take off like a wildfire.

For those that have never collected a sample–you invert a baggie (Mark your name on this baggie first to ensure it is labeled). Grab a portion of a suspicious looking sample and invert and seal the baggie. Label a second baggie with your name, the pup’s name as well as the date and time the sample was collected. Keep this sample cool (not frozen). Freshness is important; therefore, get the collected sample to the Vet office ASAP. Collect it just before you leave when possible.

This one thing can save you a lot of trouble. Stress diarrhea is a thing. We might fear the worst, and it could be stress. Canned or steamed pumpkin is great for correcting a loose stool. It is not a bad idea to give your pup a couple of tablespoons twice a day and even some berry yogurt–the kind with live cultures. These are very good for their digestion, and the yogurt helps ward off yeast infections too.

Our First Day

With Griffey

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The Name Change

Thank you again for all of the hard work and love you put into these pups. (We re-named “Otis” to now call him “Griffey, and he is already taking commands/ recognizing his new name.)

A Learning Experience

I think yesterday and today have been as much of us learning how to take care of a pup as it was for the pup learning how to adapt to his new environment. With out a doubt Griffey had stolen our hearts from the moment we met him.
Griffey is such a loving, sweet, INTELLIGENT pup.

The Trip Home and Nordy 

He did fantastic on the ride home! When he got to the house he was calm/relaxed. (The cat Nordy currently has his own opinions about Griffey 😂) He has been used to being an only child.

How It Went

Griffey has only had one accident in the house, but other than that he already knows what “go potty” means and essentially eliminates on command.
Yesterday we played so much that today has been very lazy. Not to mention the fact that we were up at five to potty, eat, play a bit, then nap.
The first night of crate training seemed like a long one (although he only cried for about 15 min initially and then woke up and needed to eliminate around 3 am then cried for about 15 min to go back to sleep again. We will be consistent with the crate training and see how long it takes for him to adapt.
Thank you two again for everything! We are so blessed to have this pup and your Support.

Breeder Comment

It is a joy to do this for a family such as yours. We look forward to hearing about your future adventures. May he live long and we hope the journey is life-changing in a good way.

Much-Loved

Koda

Hartung's Koda_1244Oh we love him so very, very much!!!!   He’s super loving, smart and just ornery enough to make you laugh often!!!  Wouldn’t trade him for the world.
Hartung's Koda_1243

Koda still doesn’t like being in a crate while we are gone!   A carabiner solved the getting out issue but I have no idea how he got the zipper on his bed open to tear up the foam.  I guess we take out everything except his stuffy while we are gone now. His crating seems to be going backwards.  Koda doesn’t realize how stubborn his dad is though. Ha-ha! 🙂

I just wish he would do better when we were gone.  I’m sure part of it is due to how much time he spends with me during the day. Working from home isn’t always a good thing. We are talking about taking him to the doggy day care one day a week some friends of ours take their dogs to. I think that would be good for him.  Don’t worry, he’s not going anywhere!!!  🙂

Breeder’s Comment

I don’t suppose Koda can blame this on the neighbor’s dog.

Willow

In The News Again

~ Jan Willow Set the Standard at Perfect!

20116807_10213083004133048_2234169274065277173_oUKC Best-In-Show and High-In-Trial Champion Sunstar Willow of OwyheeStar, AKC Canine Good Citizen, AKC Novice Trick Dog, UKC Rally Obedience I, UKC Agility I, Therapy Dog International certified!

Breeder Comment

What can we say? Congratulations hardly seem to be enough. For all the natural ability as well as Willow’s excellent temperament none of this would have been possible without Jan. It takes dedication and a lot of hard work to garner a prize, ribbon, or title. When the list of titles continues to grow, it is beyond impressive–the stellar performance makes us so proud too!

PS–what a fantastic photo!