Category Archives: Dangers

Turkey Talk

Thanksgiving

          ~What We Don’t Want

Where's the Turkey

The emergency Vet Vist probably tops our list. It is the quickest way to spoil our celebration. Nonetheless, is there a time when our attention is more divided? The snatch and grab Weimaraner could abscond with some spectacular finds. They are everywhere–the counter, the dining table, the plates, and possibly on the floor. One thing you might overlook–the rising bread dough or rolls. Bread Dough Toxicosis can prove life-threatening. Maybe a toddler is waving a turkey leg. Is that an invite? The opportunist Weimaraner will make the most of this food-driven holiday gathering.

The humans at your table–they are a significant threat to the Weimaraner. Who doesn’t want to sneak the pup a treat? But too many sneaks and the gut can become overloaded even with acceptable food. The sensitive Weim might have a bout of pancreatitis from too much fatty food. Then there are the cooked poultry bones–be sure if you throw them out it is where the Weimaraner cannot steal them.

You Might Consider

IMG_5035What if you made a plate for the Weimaraner that everyone could help share? This plating idea might work. Here are some excellent choices.

  • Turkey — no bones
  • Green beans (plain)
  • Squash or Pumpkin (plain)
  • Apple slices (without the seeds)

Avoid These

      ~ to mention a few

  • Mashed Potatoes
  • Stuffing
  • Gravy
  • Corn on the Cob
  • Nuts (pecans and Macadamia)
  • Grapes and Raisins

You can bake a Weim cookie or a Weim pie that forgoes the seasonings. Eggs and pumpkin and a tiny bit of milk will bake up nicely. You could make the crust using treats. Possibly make them in a silicone cupcake pan or cupcake papers. We are not saying it cannot be a lot of fun for the Weimar too. However, no one wants the unthinkable to spoil all the fun.

Remember, it is all good and fun until the unthinkable happens!

Here’s to an excellent Thanksgiving Day Celebration for all our Weim-loving Friends!!

Before Summer

A Spokane Family

~and their Weims–Part One

Hello OwyheeStar family!!

We’ve been having an eventful spring…well not so much for Max. He’s just chills out.
Lucy got spayed. She had some stitches come loose because she can’t not run, but all is well now.Crane_5998
She still loves to snuggle. Especially in Dad’s chair!Crane_6069
We added to our furry and feathered friends with some baby chickens. Lucy is sooooo curious, but I think it’s because she sees them as a snack. She’s become a bit of a hunter (see below)Crane_6082
Crane_6106So far, she jumps up and grabs birds out of the air, comes home with marmots, finds rabbits on hikes and most recently, a porcupine!!! 😞 (see below) that little lesson cost $300 at the pet emergency! Silly Lucy!

Crane_5064

             ~Jeff Melissa Max Lucy and Toby

                     (watch for part two)

Breeder Comment

“Ouch” porcupines are not fair game Miss Lucy. It is just horrid to see you suffer this indignity. Please be careful in the future. (OMG)

Dear Friends — we cannot thank you enough. The years we have shared, the stories, and your continued loyalty we do not take lightly. What else can we say?

Things To Know

About Parvovirus

     ~From The Animal Foundation

Canine parvovirus (commonly called parvo) is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness in puppies and dogs. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces.

Puppies, adolescent dogs, and adult dogs who are not vaccinated are at risk of contracting the virus. Protecting your puppy or dog from parvovirus could save his life.

Keep your dog healthy and parvo-free with these 8 tips:

  1. Make sure your dog is properly vaccinated. Puppies should receive their first vaccines at 6-8 weeks of age; boosters should be administered at three-week intervals until the puppy is 16 weeks of age, and then again at one year of age. Previously vaccinated adult dogs need boosters every year. Visit The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic for affordable vaccines administered seven days a week — no appointment needed!

  2. Limit your puppy or unvaccinated dog’s exposure to other dogs until he’s had his first two vaccinations, unless you are sure the other dogs are fully vaccinated.

  3. Avoid places where your puppy or unvaccinated dog could be exposed to parvovirus from unvaccinated dogs. Dog parks, pet stores, play groups, and other public areas should be avoided until your dog or puppy is fully vaccinated.

  4. When visiting your vet for wellness check-ups and vaccinations, carry your puppy in your arms outside and leave him on your lap while waiting in the lobby. Walking where other dogs have walked and gone to the bathroom will increase your puppy’s risk of contracting disease.

  5. Parvovirus is very difficult to kill and can live in the environment for over a year. If you suspect your house or yard has been infected, clean with a 1:32 dilution of bleach (1/2 cup bleach in a gallon of water). Regular soaps and disinfectants DO NOT kill parvovirus. Areas that cannot be cleaned with bleach may remain contaminated. Remember, the virus can survive on a variety of objects, including food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors.

  6. If you work or spend time in places where you have contact with dogs, change your clothes and shoes before returning home to your dog or puppy.

  7. If your dog or puppy is vomiting, has diarrhea, is not eating or is lethargic, you should take him to the vet as soon as possible. These are all symptoms of parvovirus. Remember, Infected dogs may show only one symptom!

  8. If you are considering adopting a new dog, we encourage leaving your unvaccinated puppies or dogs at home. It is very important to do a meet and greet, but take the time to make sure your dog is fully vaccinated first!

For more information on canine parvovirus, visit the American Veterinary Medical Association or the ASPCA online. And don’t forget to regularly vaccinate your dog! Click here for The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic Hours and Pricing.

OwyheeStar Comment2-Bernie X Boone 2017 WK3-48

The above post was from the www.animalfoundation.com — which is verbatim from their Website. The dangers of the parvovirus are well documented. While many of these recommendations seem absurd, there is a good reason for the concerns. All too often people unknowingly take their new puppy out to show them off in public–like to the pet store. The same place where the person with an infected puppy visit. Sadly, you have to stay away from this kind of place and pet areas during the first 16-20 weeks. We recommend getting the sixteen-week vaccine titer test for a lot of reasons. One benefit is the test results will indicate if your Weimaraner has immunity or now. You also avoid the potential severe vaccine reaction that affects around 8% of Weimaraners. These vaccine reactions are equally life-threatening. Get the vaccine titer test–if your puppy has immunity then you can out and about sooner. :O)

In twenty years, we have not had a single case of Parvo strike an OwyheeStar puppy. A lot of things have happened, but so far, we have been fortunate. We would like to keep it that way. Many of these symptoms can occur from other issues–for example, parasites. This is especially true of the nasty one-celled varieties like Giardia or Coccidia. Nonetheless, while the symptoms are horrid, it is far more treatable than the parvovirus.

We agree with the dangers of this virus, but for your Weimaraner, we recommend a different vaccine protocol. One that is very similar to that recommended by the Weimaraner Club of America (WCA). If you get a puppy from us, that protocol is found in the OwyheeStar Health Record.

New Year Celebrations

Fireworks-Remix-2015052712Fireworks!

     ~Fireworks can screw up a dog faster than anything.

 

From Steve Snell @

        Gun Dog Supply

IMG_4089Everybody needs to be careful with fireworks around their young dogs and older dogs that have not been properly conditioned to gunfire (see video).

Fireworks are unnatural. You don’t have a lot of control over when or where the noise happens. Fireworks can screw up a dog faster than anything. It’s a lot harder to fix a gun shy or noise sensitive dog than it is to prevent gun shyness in the first place.

This year, only one of my dogs is showing a little gun sensitivity, so Loretta is going to stay in the house over the holiday while the neighbors are shooting off fireworks.

Here are some tips to prevent fireworks sensitivity in your dogs:

  • Keep your dogs as far away from fireworks as possible.
  • If possible, bring your dogs inside in a closed-off, interior room.
  • Block out the noise with a TV, radio, or white-noise maker.
  • Check with your neighbors about their fireworks plans.
  • Ask for a phone call before they start.

Sometimes the fireworks start before New Year’s Eve or the 4th of July and run a few days after the holiday.

There is NO REASON for a dog to be around fireworks, and I do everything I can to keep my dogs away from them. Usually dogs conditioned to gunfire can handle the noise of fireworks, but there really isn’t anything good about them as far as dogs are concerned. We sell a couple of products that are designed to help dogs get over the fear of fireworks, but I really prefer NOT to have to sell them.

CONCERNS

My biggest concern is that a dog will hurt themselves trying to get away from the noise. My second concern is that exposure will create a gun shy or noise-sensitive problem where there doesn’t have to be one.

NOISE-SHY DOES NOT EQUAL GUN SHY

Just because a dog is noise-sensitive to fireworks, does NOT necessarily mean that will translate into gunshyness, but why take a chance?

My best gun dog ever, Em, never had a problem with gunfire, but she was so afraid of thunderstorms that we had to build a special top for her kennel run so she couldn’t climb out or hurt herself trying.

HOW NOT TO EXPOSE A NEW PUP TO FIREWORKS

I was at a party a few years back and watched a new dog get exposed to fireworks completely the wrong way. The dog was in her kennel but still in full view of everything that was going on. Once the fireworks started she became more and more upset and wanted out of the kennel. To calm her down they let her out of her crate and she made a break for it. They didn’t find her for two days.

The volume and brightness of fireworks is just too much for most dogs and nothing good is going to come from it. Please take the time to protect your pets while the possibility of unexpected explosions are around.

I do my best to keep all my dogs away from any kind of fireworks. Even dogs that have been properly conditioned to gunfire can become upset or nervous when exposed to fireworks. It just isn’t worth it.

Fireworks happens twice a year with New Year’s and Fourth of July. You might want to condition your dogs to fireworks, especially if you live where your dogs will be exposed a couple of weeks out of the year. It never hurts to check with your neighbors about their fireworks plans. Give them a heads up that you have a young dog and ask them to give you a call before they start.

People don’t think about fireworks until it’s too late, so think about it a little now. The majority of dogs don’t have a problem with it, but some do. Why take a chance? No point in stressing your dogs out.

Remember, if you want to shoot fireworks, be safe and have fun. Just keep in mind that unexpected noise and stress could create a problem where one doesn’t exist. — Steve

Did you Move?

Don’t Forget To Update

 

Birch's Mesquite_0627

Mesquite near the gate at her new home in Washington

 

Are you moving across town or the country? If you have moved or are moving one thing that is often forgotten is to update the Microchip Registry. Better yet, before you move make sure your contact information is up to date. What if the unforeseen happened during the relocation? Moving is demanding. All the packing and logistics of the relocation takes a concerted effort on your part. We understand how easy it would be to forget this little detail. AKC Reunite has you covered–Click Here to get to the Website.

AKC Reunite.png

Did You Forget Altogether?

When you took home the OwyheeStar puppy, it was microchipped. Our records indicate a percentage of you didn’t register with AKC Reunite. The fee is a one-time thing. That is your only cost for the microchip. We have you covered. Inside your portfolio, there were three papers all containing the microchip number.

  1. The OwyheeStar Health Record
  2. The AKC Reunite Portfolio
  3. The Veterinary Report

All three of these records can be found in the front flap slot of your puppy record folder. We talk a lot of people who feel displaced during the holiday season. Pets can also be left out of the mix and the Weimaraner, in particular, could suffer from anxiety. Separation anxiety often surfaces during a time of change or when the Weimar is left behind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pumpkin Pie Diversions

Happy Thanksgiving!

      ~What’s for the Weimar?

Whatever they can nab.

Hook's Kirby-6467515_o

While you are eating your pumpkin pie piled high with whipped cream, don’t forget us fur kids. We are on holiday alert. No plate goes uncleaned or unclaimed. We are no respecter of leaving the food. We take it and then we will deal with the consequences.

Did you say Whipped Cream?

https://videopress.com/embed/xjdI3Y9d?hd=0&autoPlay=0&permalink=0&loop=0

Hey-there peeps–remember the list of stuff that will take us on a trip to the Emergency Room. Try to selective in the counter surfing. I don’t want to be reading about an emergency surgery, stomach pumping, or pancreatitis.

Breeder’s Comment

We at OwyheeStar wish everyone a Happy Thanksgiving. No matter what is happening in our lives, we have much to give thanks for without question. Please do keep an eye on your opportunist Weimaraner. Remember not everyone is going to follow the rules. Keep them safe.

Gobble Gobble

For Thanksgiving

          ~What We Don’t Want

Where's the Turkey

OK–I see you, now where is the good stuff?

The emergency Vet Vist probably tops our list. It is the quickest way to spoil our celebration. Nonetheless, is there a time when our attention is more divided? The snatch and grab Weimaraner could abscond with some spectacular finds. They are everywhere–the counter, the dining table, the plates, and possibly on the floor. One thing you might overlook–the rising bread dough or rolls. Bread Dough Toxicosis can prove life-threatening. Maybe a toddler is waving a turkey leg. Is that an invite? The opportunist Weimaraner will make the most of this food-driven holiday gathering.

The humans at your table–they are a significant threat to the Weimaraner. Who doesn’t want to sneak the pup a treat? But too many sneaks and the gut can become overloaded even with acceptable food. The sensitive Weim might have a bout of pancreatitis from too much fatty food. Then there are the cooked poultry bones–be sure if you throw them out it is where the Weimaraner cannot steal them.

You Might Consider

What if you made a plate for the Weimaraner that everyone could help share? This plating idea might work. Here are some excellent choices.

  • Turkey — no bones
  • Green beans (plain)
  • Squash or Pumpkin (plain)
  • Apple slices (without the seeds)

Avoid These

      ~ to mention a few

  • Mashed Potatoes
  • Stuffing
  • Gravy
  • Corn on the Cob
  • Nuts (pecans and Macadamia)
  • Grapes and Raisins

You can bake a Weim cookie or a Weim pie that forgoes the seasonings. Eggs and pumpkin and a tiny bit of milk will bake up nicely. You could make the crust using treats. Possibly make them in a silicone cupcake pan or cupcake papers. We are not saying it cannot be a lot of fun for the Weimar too. However, no one wants the unthinkable to spoil all the fun.

Dash

Happy Together

IMG_3634

Dash had his 12-Week Vet Visit and the Parvo Shot today. He is 24 pounds and has the best disposition. He is just a gorgeous boy!

Breeder Comment

Dave, we are happy to learn you and Dasher are off to a great start. It is also a blessing to know that you are delighted with your new family addition. We know how important that is and never more so when someone has had a less than ideal experience before coming to OwyheeStar.

The importance of looks–while often a top consideration, pales in comparison to temperament and health. A beautiful unhealthy Weimaraner is heartbreaking. We realize that living creatures have issues–some more than others. Regardless, getting off to a fantastic start with a thriving pup is something we wish for every OwyheeStar client. Of course, we give tips that can help maintain these goals–follow the OwyheeStar Weimaraner Vaccine protocol, keep guard against parasites (they are everywhere), and get the basics done. Each of these things is foundational. There may be hiccups and rabbit trails along the journey, but nothing is more imperative than getting off to a good start.

Parasites are something not discussed much on the blog. Nonetheless, a goodly percentage of pups become infected–OwyheeStar and other than OwyheeStar. Possibly the biggest culprits are Giardia and Coccidia–one-celled parasites that are found in the environment. To some degree cleaning practices can help avoid these issues; however, puddle-drinkers and paw-lickers can ingest these opportunistic predators. When they do, they can take off like a wildfire in the gut. This scenario is best avoided–it can undo housebreaking at its best. A simple fecal check can help prevent this unraveling adventure no one wants to visit. Of course, keeping the young pup wormed is essential too.

Loose stools can be caused by stress but should you see them it is best to keep an eye on things. The cost of the fecal exam can put your mind at ease. Many times these issues resolve without medication–that is optimal. Pumpkin or squash are helpful. Bloody or mucous filled stools (a bigger concern) should be checked. If you see them, don’t think the worst–so far, no OwyheeStar pup has been lost to the Parvovirus. (I hold my breath as I type that statement, but following our recommendations helps keep your new family member safe). There are a number of things that can bring on such an event (terrible diarrhea)–the parasite infestation, and irritated gut, etc. Some Weims have a very sensitive stomach. The same ones may not leave the woodpile alone or stay out of the trashcan. (oops) It is imperative that you are proactive and find a solution–not only can ingesting these garbage-can-finds be upsetting, but it can also be life-threatening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mesquite

Thriving In Her Golden Year Placement

August 31, 2017 (Lyle keeps us apprised)

Birch's Mesquite_0627Everything is going great with Mesquite, she is settling in just fine.  She did a little howling, but that has been about it.  She loves her morning walks, she is eating well.  She has been taking a nap after eating and walking which works out just right for us.  We leave the house at 5:45 AM in the morning and walk for about an hour.  She has found out what puncture vines are.  When she steps on one, she will stop and raise her paw so we can remove it.

We are taking her out to the vet tomorrow afternoon, for her checkup.

I have been keeping her in the house during the day because it is so darn hot.  She sleeps in her kennel at night. I run the fan until about 3AM.

She is a Peach, and we both love her dearly. Everyone comments how pretty she is while we are out walking.  I like to go early in the morning, because it is cool, and there are usually no other dogs out and about. I showed pictures of her at the gun club yesterday.  Steve Williams really liked her.

September 1, 2017

Birch's Mesquite_0619We took Mesquite to the Vet this afternoon, she did well, she is good and healthy. The girls at the clinic just loved her. She got her rabies shot, will get a kennel cough in two weeks.
Set her up on the 26th of September to get her spayed, will also get her teeth cleaned. They can clean her teeth while under anesthetic.
She really has a personality, she can walk on her lip when things don’t go her way, but she gets over it quickly. We both love her dearly and I am sure she feels the same about us. The girls at the Vet clinic said they didn’t think it would be long before we had another dog.
She is still eating well, even with the heat. She always leaves a few kernels of dog food in the pan when she is done. Maybe she is saving some food for later in the day. It is the same each feeding. I am sure she will eat better when it cools off. She is very alert and doesn’t miss a thing. She sleeps with one eye open.

September 6, 2017Birch's Mesquite_0623

Cliff:
I loaded up 10 or 12 shotshells with just the primer. I took Mesquite out in the field, had my wife hold her on the leash, I would fire a couple of rounds and move closer each two rounds. I fired the last two rounds at about five yards from her, she showed no fear.  She seemed interested.  I took her down to the trap range today. I stayed 60 yards behind the shooters, again she showed interest and no fear. I conclude she is not gun shy.
Now I have to find some pheasants. I might have to wait until after she is spayed and healed up. Will probably wait until I go over to my son’s place in Montana. I can work with her one on one, with no other hunters or dogs around.
I wanted to show her off to the guys at the trap club today. A lot of them hunt and they thought she was gorgeous. I especially wanted Steve Williams to see her, and he thought she was a doll. He said he thought Mesquite was a little bit longer than his female.
She likes her morning walks, sometimes I walk her twice a day. She has pretty much seattled in here. She sticks to me like glue. The only problem I had with her, she howls a little at night, and when we are gone during the day. She is getting better. I am thinking of getting a bark collar and trying that. I think she misses her kennel mates. I got her some chew bones to help keep her teeth clean, and the part she doesn’t eat she will hide. She learned to do this if she wanted to keep it away from the other dogs. We are more than happy with her, and I think she likes it her. I think she will hunt birds.
September 7, 2018
Thanks for sending video of the OwyheeStar Weimaraner’s.  I was listening to them and Mesquite was in the room with me, and she recognized Cliff voice, she got all excited.   She knew who it was all right.

September 15, 2008 (a note from Cliff and Shela)

For Those That don’t know about Mesquite—click here!

We received a phone call from Lyle telling us everything is going well. The only problem he has encountered is she seems to have a desire to chase cars.

Mesquite has never had the opportunity to give chase to a car, a bike, or a skateboard. Nonetheless, this desire to give chase is hard-wired into the breed. It has a lot to do with prey drive; so caution is in order when walking in an area where there are turning wheels. This advice is good for anyone.

Mesquite also committed a Weim-crime. She cleaned a platter of sausage meant for Lyle’s breakfast. Evidently, she navigated the counter between two glasses and slicked up the plate without moving a thing. Welcome to Weim Counter-surfing. It is their Olympic Sport of choice.

Thank you ever so much for everything you are doing for and with Mesquite. And we truly appreciate you keeping us abreast of your progress and the adventures. We know you have always had other breeds (mainly the Vizsla recently) so we are thrilled you are enjoying this experience. Tell the Williams we said hello!

Extending our Time

Delicate Discussions

   ~ Part Two

5-Hollee X Benton_4942

Last Friday we discussed the accidental loss of the Weimaraner. One of those haunting and gut-wrenching scenarios that stick with you forever. Of course, we have to be ever vigilant and make sure they are as secure as it is possible. There are; however, other considerations that may well extend your pup’s chance of survival.

No one wants to consider that they might lose their puppy sooner rather than later. While there are no guarantees there a few things we can do to increase the potential longevity.

  1.  Be cautious with the vaccine — we recommend never doubling up the vaccine. That means if you are planning to get an annual DAPPv (Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1 (Hepatitis), Adenovirus Type 2 (Respiratory Disease), Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus) do not combine it with Lepto, Kennel Cough Protection, or the Rabies. It may be your Vet’s standard protocol, but spreading them out is less of a hit on their immune system. (Getting the Lepto only vaccine also gives you greater protection against Lepto).8-Bernie X Boone WK1-22Follow the suggested OwyheeStar puppy vaccine protocol and get a titer test instead of the typical sixteen-week puppy shot. Getting the titers checked for immunity is the smart approach–even if your puppy has shown no sign of being vaccine reactive. Most Weimaraners who have a severe, life-threatening reaction to the sixteen-week shot never had a problem with any previous puppy vaccination. The vaccine titer costs a bit more but nothing in comparison to developing an ongoing immune system issue.

    After the one-year booster, you might consider (down the road) checking the titers again to see if they are still immune. Many professionals have come around to the idea that the DAPPv protection often lasts three years or even longer. The beautiful thing about a titer test is you can find out their immunity level. The unnecessary vaccine could be a potential trigger to a serious health issue.

  2.  Be as Holistic as possible. There are different approaches to Veterinary care. According to the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA)  holistic medicine humane to the core. The techniques used in holistic medicine are gentle, minimally invasive, and incorporate patient well-being and stress reduction. Holistic thinking is centered on love, empathy, and respect. Click on the link in this paragraph to learn more about this approach to Veterinary medicine.
  3.  Medications–some are not as safe as others in our opinion and experience. 20229379_10155028879813305_8042793045446538520_nRimadyl (carprofen) and its generic counterpart Novox Carprofen are something we are not comfortable using for the Weimaraner. You never know when it is going to have a serious adverse side effect–in our case and that of two other OwyheeStar clients experience it led to severe and uncontrollable seizures. There are alternative anti-inflammatory medications. Whenever possible, we recommend you avoid Rimadyl. If it becomes necessary, then try to reduce the dosage or get off it as soon as possible. To manage or to prevent this situation; however, requires that you advocate because it is most usually the go to drug of choice after surgery or when facing arthritic situations.
  4. No one food is right for every Weimaraner. A quality grain-free food is our suggestion, and we are not speaking about one of these premium brands that touts all kind of additives. We believe in adding a quality supplement in the right dosage and staying away from foods that claim they add these things. Why? You might ask. Well,  supplements get old, and even dog food needs to be fresh. Also, how do you know the quality of the additives? You don’t. Stick with the basic quality food and add something that is proven and has excellent quality control. Keep in mind, many of the Big Name Brands are not as high quality as you might think. Your pocketbook may not be able to afford a raw food diet, or the best dog food money can buy. You can provide basic quality food. The right food is apt to help them live longer.
  5. NuVet--we cannot say enough about this supplement. The only caution we have is for young pups. Too much of a good thing can be counterproductive. We suggest you follow our recommended protocol. A small amount of the NuVet powder sprinkled on the young Weimaraner’s food every day will make a big difference. It might take time to see results if you have existing problems, but there are many testimonials including the one we received last week from Mary.  (Click on the NuVet  link below to learn more about this supplement.)

    She writes. PS – when we got Olli we started both dogs on Nuvet. Rudi had horrible allergies but they steadily improved over the last 2 years to the point of not needing any medication. Coincidence?  I think not. We are sold on the benefits.

  6. Bloat is a complicated and somewhat mysterious life-threatening situation. We are going to refer you to an article (rather than addressing it ourselves).  Click Here to find out more about the risk of bloat, thank you!
  7. Insurance–the pros and cons of having it. We believe you should invest in some kind of major medical coverage. Eventually, the athletic Weimaraner is going to need extreme Veterinary or special care. Sometimes this happens early in life–a torn ACL, etc. There is the threat of bloat (as mentioned above) in this breed, too! We cannot speak to which insurance company pays the best. Our Vet Office has their favorite company because they say they pay quickly. Some people say that if you get the insurance up front that the first year is nearly a wash. Many policies cover the vaccine, general care and then you have the cost of the spay or the neuter. (Typically, there is a set allotted amount to cover basic visits in some of these policies–each one is different).
  8. Do your research, but keep in mind that many of these surgical procedures cost Crane's Lucy4$2,000 and up. Insurance doesn’t negate your personal responsibility. We might forget we are the gatekeeper and in the heat of the moment simply say do whatever is needed. Insurance means it might not be a cost consideration–in the midst of a crisis, your Weimaraner may receive medication that leads to other issues. Everyone just wants to trust their Vet to do what is right. We understand. Nevertheless, it is important to always keep in mind that they are treating all breeds and a lot of mutts. Each Veterinary fur client is important, but they are not all equally sensitive to certain vaccines, medication, etc.

Thank you, for doing the best by your Weimaraner. We appreciate every sacrifice made for our OwyheeStar offspring. We work with the best Weimlovers in the universe. How privileged we are!?!

The photos we added are not directly related to loss–just a reminder of what we value.