Skye & Haze

The Blue’s Sisters

      ~ Part One

Skye & Haze will be 5 years old this year!  Time has flown by with them,.. it seems like yesterday we were doing the puppy thing. They are spending most of their winter days lounging around the house… on the furniture of course! We take them out for a good run every day, even if they have to plow through the snow…. they look forward to their outdoor play time, and can’t wait for spring!

Competing and Winning Ribbons

Skye and Haze3

Skye loves to compete in AKC Rally competitions and also AKC Nosework competitions. Haze competes in Rally as well and also is working on completing her Excellent title (like Skye) by this summer. Watch for more on Skye and Haze–coming soon to the blog.

We keep the girls in weekly classes at our dog training club to keep them socialized, and to give them something for their minds to work on. We are delighted with our pups and can’t imagine life without them!  Blessings to you!   ~ Jean & Nancy

 

Breeder Comment

Cliff and I are so very proud of all you two (or maybe we should say four) have achieved. It is no small thing. We know what a huge challenge this breed can bring. As you once explained to me Jean–AKC Rally is like Agility on Steriods. What more do we need to say?

Please watch for the two segments — one featuring Skye and the other Haze. Although they are rarely out of each other’s shadow, for a brief moment they will be a star on our blog. We think you will be interested to learn more about them.

Socks

Repurposed socks

      ~ Fun with Charlie Mae

Spight's Longhair1355_n

The Game–the way things work!

This continues to be her favorite game. Grab a sock from wherever she can get it – dirty clothes/clean clothes/from a drawer, it matters not!!! Once she successfully finds one, then she comes and finds us to make sure we see she’s got one.

It’s then time for the chase. This is where we run around the house after her, eventually, she jumps on our bed and with some negotiating she will drop it… It’s SO cute (most of the time), if you don’t co-operate with her plan, she’s been known to take out her frustration on the found sock… We just love this big personality pup!

Breeder Comment

We are in the middle of the Longhair discussion on the blog. It seems right to showcase one today. What better thing to have this from Will and Jill?

Yesterday, Charlie Mae was on the blog (her silhouette), but there is a lot more to the Longhair than that feathering. It has been some time since I talked about the Longhair Weimaraner. There are a very few OwyheeStar clients that don’t care for the look of the Longhair; however, by and large, most really love the idea–even if they don’t embrace getting one. Not everyone is going to like the same thing. That being said–much of what we have achieved is due to the Longhair DNA pool. Those who voice the loudest objections are often the recipient of the benefits.

Your family are adamant Weimaraner lovers–you have had nearly every look available except the Blue Longhair. We know Ellie, your daughter, hopes to one day get a second Longhair. Cliff and I still remember when you contacted us, and the only thing we had available was Charlie Mae. You met us to see what they were like and soon we heard that you wanted to add her to your family. It makes us happy to know you enjoy this lovely girl. Of course, you still have Murphy–the traditional Blue Weimaraner. He is much-loved as well. Thank you, for being a faithful and devoted OwyheeStar Weim-loving family. Here ( https://owyheestarweimaranersnews.com/2016/03/06/murphy/ ) is the last time Murphy, your Blue Boy appeared on the blog.

Feathering

The Longhair 

     ~ Part Two

 

Spight's Charlie Mae Feathering1345_nYesterday we discussed a bit about what it takes to raise Longhair puppies. We also talked about Longhair’s the tail as well as the feathering. Here is a beautiful photo (of Charlie Mae) that shows you what we mean.

Puppies

When the pups first arrive you would be hardpressed to guess the coat length. Some folks marvel at that statement, but here is some evidence that will stand on its own.

 

From The Sadie X Stackhouse Litter

Honestly, I cannot remember if this was 2016 or 2017 because Miss Sadie is retired. The photos are still relevant. Sadie is a lovely tradition Blue Weimaraner (who is a Carrier). Of course, you remember Stackhouse–our gorgeous Gray Longhair Stud. Together, they produced some fantastic pups. Those of you who have signed up for a puppy from such a litter as this (with mixed coat lengths know what I mean. By week two you can begin to see which are Longhairs, but I am going to show you the Newborn and Week Five photos. Sadie has just the six pups in this litter.

Puppy # 1 (Gray Longhair)

 

Puppy #2 (Gray Longhair)

 

Puppy #3 (Blue –Traditional Smooth Coat)

 

Puppy #4 (Blue –Traditional Smooth Coat)

Puppy #5 (Gray Longhair)

 

Puppy #6 (Blue Longhair)

 

 

The first thing you might notice is the percentage of Longhair pups far exceeds the 50% expectations. Also, there are no Gray or Silver Gray traditional smooth coats in this litter. You can never guess what you might get, despite the chart that the DNA professionals publish. It is an average over time.

We hope you are enjoying this information. Not everyone is a fan of the Longhair, but they have been in the Weimaraner lineage forever. At one point in time, the Germans were going to eliminate the Longhair with selective breeding. There are various stories as to why they opted to forgo the selective breeding to get rid of them. Regardless, they are a thing and popular throughout the globe. In most countries, they can compete on every level; however, in America, they cannot.

 

Talking About

The Longhair

     ~ Part One

Stackhouse_9693

Stackhouse, the infamous OwyheeStar Gray Longhair Stud Dog, was featured on yesterday’s blog. Many of our readers have gorgeous pups from a Stackhouse-sired litter. You might find it interesting to note that there are more smooth coats than longhairs. To get a litter in which the longhair pups present requires a Mama who carries the DNA marker for the fluffy-coat, too! Even when they do, unless they are also a Longhair (and not just a Carrier), only a portion of the litter will have the longer coat length.

The Affected and The Carrier

When mating the Affected (a Longhair such as Stackhouse) with a Weimaraner who is a Carrier (such as Dazee) statistically, we should be able to expect 50% of the pups to be Longhairs. Over the last decade plus, we have learned this is an average and not a guarantee. (Ha!) For example, we mated the same pair two years in a row. The first year we only had two longhairs in a litter of eight pups. The next year (with the same everything) we had six longhairs in a litter of eight. It is like everything Weimaraner; predictions are nearly impossible.

Two Carriers mated are said to result in a 25% longhair to smooth coat ratio. There are other factors, but as with the aforementioned (Longhair to Carrier) scenario, it is impossible to predict the outcome. On a couple of occasions, the Carrier to Carrier mating produced no longhairs-othertimes, the result was near the 50% ratio. It is difficult for everyone who is hoping for the Longhair arrival status.

Many folks covet the smooth coats out of such a mating. Their coats tend to be thicker and velvet-like. Waterfowl hunters like to find such a pup because the coat is not only a bit warmer but water resistant. Sure they still get wet, but there is a measure of protection.

The Hair Factor

There is no doubt that the Longhairs are a bit messier; however, it is nothing as you imagine. Unlike the more popular Labrador, the Longhair Weimaraner doesn’t deposit hair all over you and your belongings. It is hard to believe this as being true–especially if you are coming from a situation where you are vacuuming hair from a fur family member who has been gone for some time. It is good to keep them groomed, but even for those that go natural, it is shocking how little they shed.

Longhair Discussions

Stackhouse_9692This blog is the first in a short series discussing the Longhair Weimaraner. Some of you are adverse to the idea of the tendrils (or the feathering) and a fluffy tail. Others are intrigued, and still many of you have both a Longhair and a traditional smooth coat Weimaraner.

We might also mention that the Longhair coat varies widely–some are thick, but more often they are similar looking to the classic look with the feathering on the ears and legs. Oh and then there is the ever so slight additional fluff on the face that almost speaks to a teddy bear look.

The Longhair always sports the undocked tail (unless there was a mistaken assumption that they were a smooth coat). Expedited DNA Testing helps prevent such an error. The newborn pups (longhair and traditional) are nearly impossible to sort; therefore, to ensure accuracy, we do the DNA testing.

 

 

Stackhouse

Helping Cliff

The Boys_9699Cliff needs a sidekick. Shela is otherwise engaged, and therefore Stackhouse is pretty much always on the heels of Mr. Cliff. He has been patiently waiting for Cliff to complete the current round of greenhouse additions. Stackhouse is ready to go.

While He Waits

I love finding him sitting in the Gator. To be totally honest, Mr. Stack sometimes wants to escape and explore. You might not think this is a problem, but he bothers the kitties and gets into stuff. (oops)

This sweet boy is like all other Weimars–all about the relationship; but the universe surrounds him. The world as he knows it (at OwyheeStar) is complicated. Before long the time change is going to rock his routine. How will we explain that?

2018 Weekly Synopsis

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

At OwyheeStar

Dusty Treat on Nose-2Dusty was not doing well. After his birthday, we realized he is getting old. (OMG) We don’t look at this as borrowed time, but the reality is we don’t know how much time we have left. When he took ill I suddenly realized that a senior doesn’t have the strength of recovery that a young person does. It is just a fact. So, seeing him with a bounce in his step is super great.

This Week on the Blog

Here are the week’s posts. Pictured are Hemi and Dakota who said their goodbyes. We all send their families our thoughts and prayers for healing. There is mention of Clyde who passed on about three years ago in the segment featuring Luke. These wonder creatures get in our heart and soul in a way it is hard to explain. Finally, we closed with new from Ron about his two Weimaraners. Again, we are incredibly thankful for all of you who faithfully stay in touch and share your experience.

Sunday—February 11— The Hope
Monday —February 12— Dakota

Tuesday —February 13— Things to Know (about Parvovirus)

Wednesday —February 14— News (Luke in SanFrancisco)

Thursday –February 15 — Now (Hemi)

Friday — February 16 — From Ron (About Tobryn and Tallyn)

 

On a very personal note

 

IMG_0033.JPGCliff continues to work on the greenhouse project. As with anything, it is always more involved than a person plans. This situation requires inspiration and more than a bit of knack. We are making it up as we go. Cliff says it is a fun project. I am glad he is having fun with it. I know he needs to get it buttoned up so he can move to other things. I also need to be able to get our seeds started. No rush, right?

Basketball is over. I will share this one last video of clips taken from the last game we were able to attend. They came away with a win. This team is the JV which Bradley moved up to because they are trying to develop him early. He is in the white jersey–#42. Brad is the youngest on the team but the tallest by a smidge, I think. Most certainly, he wears the largest tennis shoe size–at 18. (OMG) No, Cliff doesn’t have large feet. He requires a 10.5 or 11.

I continue eliminating and going through things. (OMG) We have been in the farmhouse two years come the first of May. Yesterday, I went through a box of cassettes–boxed up the must save family videos that need to be converted. I reserved a very few others from our past; many went into the trash. This sorting seems to be endless, but I am hoping come May 2019 that there will be a much more manageable amount of belongings. I think I have been brutal but then I look, and there is yet another box that needs to be gone through. We want to minimalize as much as possible and end up with what we need and want. Of course, we have treasures stowed away.

 

From Ron

In The Kitchen

     ~With Tobryn and Tallyn

(02/12/2018) Have thought about you and Cliff many times in the last few weeks so that means I need to either email, call, etc.  The attached video is Tobryn and Tallyn having a moment in the kitchen.  Tobryn turned 5 last October and Tallyn will be 2 this June.  Yikes…….so true that time marches on.  Hope you have your health back and all is well with Cliff.

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(02/13/2018) Great hearing back from you.  Winter has been frigid here, but my home is warm and with the boys in bed at night (under the covers) is sometimes too warm.  LOL

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Ron, for the update. We are glad you are staying warm this winter. The boys look happy and well-adjusted. I was thinking as I received your note, how we spoke about the possibility of getting two ten years before it became a reality. Like you say–time flies by too quickly.

 

Now

Hemi

     ~ Joins Turbo and Sophie

waite-family-visit-april-15-2010-8

Happier Times — Turbo, Hemi, and Sophie

I haven’t talked to you guys in quite a while and I thought I would drop you a line or two. Hope guys are doing well. We are doing pretty good here but tomorrow will mark 2 weeks since we had to put our Hemi down. She was 13.5 years and pretty lumpy and bumpy. Her arthritis was getting pretty bad and she developed a chronic cough with sometimes bloody phlegm.

Peaceful Exit

Our vet came out to the house and she went peacefully over the rainbow bridge.

Zoey and Magnum

 

Magnum and Zoey_0656

From the Archives — Zoey and Magnum enjoying life on the sofa

Zoey and Magnum are now settling in with the new adjustment. Who will be the boss now? They are saying. Zoey still drags Magnum around by the collar at times. Do I think she might be the boss? They are very much like siblings.

 

Final Thoughts

Putting Hemi down was such a hard thing to do but I knew it was time. She still ate well and did her business outside and still wanted to go on walks, short ones. She was on pain pills 3 times a day and Rimadyl twice a day. We wanted to say thank you for such beautiful blessings in our lives.

Breeder Comment

What can we say? The passing of Hemi is a huge loss, but we all knew it was only a matter of time. You gave her the best of everything. Of course, she endured the new whipper-snapper crew of Magnum and Zoey. It is good those two had each other. I am sure it gave Hemi a bit of relief.

Thank you, Monica. You folks are more than OwyheeStar clients. It is like extended family to us. We have a lot of history, and I still chuckle at the stories of Turbo’s antics. All the joy and fun and yet it has to come to this. It is how the world works. Anyhow, we sincerely hope that Zoey and Magnum live a long and healthy life. Thank you, again, for being loyal and so much more.

News

From SanFrancisco

     ~ Luke is Well

IMG_2090.jpgI hope you are still cancer free and you, Cliff and the family are doing well. I switched jobs after Clyde passed at 13 YO and miss receiving your blog but my flatmate Jim keeps me informed.

img_0307.jpgLuke, now  at 6 YO weathered Clyde’s passing well and has of course appropriately taken charge. He has grown up to be every bit as special as Clyde and is such a wonderful companion for us. We recently purchased a rental home in the desert and much to our surprise this hound that is not fond of the ocean doesn’t think twice about jumping into the deep end to get the ball. He is even happy to put his head under water to retrieve something on the steps of the shallow end!! HE LOVES TO SWIM….and so do I –just sayin’…

 

Anyway, we are all fine and I finally hit 60… winding down over the next couple of years and am interested in expanding the family in the near future so wanted to make sure to do this before you 2 retire. Will your family continue with your business? We are so impressed with the detail and care that you have exhibited in your raising and placement of your pups. I go on and on to friends about you 2 frequently.

 

I think we’ll likely go for the Blue male again, maybe a Blue longhair.

 

Thanks, Love and Light,

Cal

Breeder Comment

Thank you, for the kind words and the endorsement. We are happy to learn that Luke is doing so well. Of course, we will never forget Clyde’s run. Thank you as well for all the updates over the years. It means a lot to us.

I will send you what we need to get the process of getting another OwyheeStar started. Speaking to retirement–we have no plans to retire; however, there is no guarantee. Life is a day to day experience. We will continue to raise the Weimaraner and share them as long as it is possible. Again, thank you for your concern.

 

Things To Know

About Parvovirus

     ~From The Animal Foundation

Canine parvovirus (commonly called parvo) is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness in puppies and dogs. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces.

Puppies, adolescent dogs, and adult dogs who are not vaccinated are at risk of contracting the virus. Protecting your puppy or dog from parvovirus could save his life.

Keep your dog healthy and parvo-free with these 8 tips:

  1. Make sure your dog is properly vaccinated. Puppies should receive their first vaccines at 6-8 weeks of age; boosters should be administered at three-week intervals until the puppy is 16 weeks of age, and then again at one year of age. Previously vaccinated adult dogs need boosters every year. Visit The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic for affordable vaccines administered seven days a week — no appointment needed!

  2. Limit your puppy or unvaccinated dog’s exposure to other dogs until he’s had his first two vaccinations, unless you are sure the other dogs are fully vaccinated.

  3. Avoid places where your puppy or unvaccinated dog could be exposed to parvovirus from unvaccinated dogs. Dog parks, pet stores, play groups, and other public areas should be avoided until your dog or puppy is fully vaccinated.

  4. When visiting your vet for wellness check-ups and vaccinations, carry your puppy in your arms outside and leave him on your lap while waiting in the lobby. Walking where other dogs have walked and gone to the bathroom will increase your puppy’s risk of contracting disease.

  5. Parvovirus is very difficult to kill and can live in the environment for over a year. If you suspect your house or yard has been infected, clean with a 1:32 dilution of bleach (1/2 cup bleach in a gallon of water). Regular soaps and disinfectants DO NOT kill parvovirus. Areas that cannot be cleaned with bleach may remain contaminated. Remember, the virus can survive on a variety of objects, including food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors.

  6. If you work or spend time in places where you have contact with dogs, change your clothes and shoes before returning home to your dog or puppy.

  7. If your dog or puppy is vomiting, has diarrhea, is not eating or is lethargic, you should take him to the vet as soon as possible. These are all symptoms of parvovirus. Remember, Infected dogs may show only one symptom!

  8. If you are considering adopting a new dog, we encourage leaving your unvaccinated puppies or dogs at home. It is very important to do a meet and greet, but take the time to make sure your dog is fully vaccinated first!

For more information on canine parvovirus, visit the American Veterinary Medical Association or the ASPCA online. And don’t forget to regularly vaccinate your dog! Click here for The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic Hours and Pricing.

OwyheeStar Comment2-Bernie X Boone 2017 WK3-48

The above post was from the www.animalfoundation.com — which is verbatim from their Website. The dangers of the parvovirus are well documented. While many of these recommendations seem absurd, there is a good reason for the concerns. All too often people unknowingly take their new puppy out to show them off in public–like to the pet store. The same place where the person with an infected puppy visit. Sadly, you have to stay away from this kind of place and pet areas during the first 16-20 weeks. We recommend getting the sixteen-week vaccine titer test for a lot of reasons. One benefit is the test results will indicate if your Weimaraner has immunity or now. You also avoid the potential severe vaccine reaction that affects around 8% of Weimaraners. These vaccine reactions are equally life-threatening. Get the vaccine titer test–if your puppy has immunity then you can out and about sooner. :O)

In twenty years, we have not had a single case of Parvo strike an OwyheeStar puppy. A lot of things have happened, but so far, we have been fortunate. We would like to keep it that way. Many of these symptoms can occur from other issues–for example, parasites. This is especially true of the nasty one-celled varieties like Giardia or Coccidia. Nonetheless, while the symptoms are horrid, it is far more treatable than the parvovirus.

We agree with the dangers of this virus, but for your Weimaraner, we recommend a different vaccine protocol. One that is very similar to that recommended by the Weimaraner Club of America (WCA). If you get a puppy from us, that protocol is found in the OwyheeStar Health Record.