Liberty Belle

Breeder Comment

Last week we shared about Libbie’s (Liberty Belle) trip home on the airplane, as well as her extraordinary initial adjustment.  It was nothing short of phenomenal, but a lot had to do with how she began her journey. She learned to settle in the carryon bag–yes, I did work with her before she left OwyheeStar. Regardless, there is something to be said about the pup that settles–they can learn nearly anything. The carryon bag is like an extreme crate-training session–only you must succeed to be able to fly with them in the bag. Here are some photos of Libbie on her day of travel.

Quinci's Libbie_0806

Finally, a calm follow through makes a lot of difference. So, there were two huge factors contributing to the excellent start. 1. There is the settling in the carryon bag. 2. There is the human factor where they stayed calm and followed through. Honestly, it is not all that easy, but it is effective. All the human emotion and excitement can be the unraveling the transition. (OMG)

Day One with Libbie

Quinci's Libbie_0862

We got up this morning and started the daily routine. I took off work to help her transition to her work days with Scott, and get familiar with how it’s all going to work. As I’m typing this, she is sleeping and figuring it out.
She has really done phenomenally so far with everything, I, we are truly amazed at her learning things and remembering them. It’s almost scary as to how smart she is, are we going to be able to keep up with her staying interested and busy learning more 🙂 ?!
What an incredible gift you have given us! We are more grateful than you can possibly know!  As I mentioned earlier, our family is complete again, and we owe it all to you. Thank you!!!!
Thank you for all of the suggestions! I’m definitely going to check out the AKC Good Citizen Title program, sounds fun and will help me keep Libbie learning and interested and obedient :)! Also, I’m going to start the standing process as well, what a great idea, makes total sense!

Breeder Comment

Watch for the next segment in this story. We hope you enjoy the explanations shared her and marvel at Libbie’s quick adjustment. Make sure you don’t compare yourself to this experience. Everyone is unique. Let’s face it–we are not all wired exactly the same. We humans have to grow and learn and some of us struggle a lot more. Also, once a mistake is made it can take a lot of effort to make an adjustment. It is wise not to let frustration take hold if such an event occurs–the Weimaraner takes their cue from you. If you are concerned, worried, or frazzled they will know. Even when you wear a smile and the outward upbeat attitude, the Weim knows what you feel. It is hard to hide our true feelings from the Weimaraner. (oops)
I do believe there are some useful lessons here. Cliff and I appreciate Libbie’s family for sharing in elegant detail their experience. It is a gift to everyone who reads this blog. Oh, and if you are wondering what we were discussing regarding the standing, it a  process where you stand your Weimaraner on a short table and more or less pat them down all over. It is more detailed than explained here. Nevertheless, in essence, you get them to love being touched and make sure the Weim accepts the touching of their face, tail, ears, etc.

Alder

First Oregon

     ~Now he’s a California Boy

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Alder here just letting you know I am Award Winning Weimar!

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Our perfect shy little puppy is anything but shy any longer! Alder will approach almost anyone or anything for some play time. After living in Oregon for the first few months, we moved to Southern California! Alder quickly adjusted. Let’s just say we can’t keep him out of the ocean, and if he is out, then he is rolling in the sand which is wonderful for our home and cars.

Being a household dog means he never ceases to entertain us. He has two chihuahua siblings and frankly, our 85 lb monster thinks he’s the same size as his little buddies. He makes this clear while trying to sit on our laps in the car, or by sleeping on their tiny beds. All in all, we wouldn’t trade our perfect pup for anything!

IMG_4647I just thought we should email you to let you how happy my family and I are to have found you guys. It was our good fortune because we got our beautiful and the most perfect dog from you–Alder. I included some pictures in case you guys wanted to see how much he’s grown! He loves to cuddle, play at the beach, and fetch pretty much anything. We could not be happier.

Breeder Comment

We are ever so happy to receive news of Alder. We are also especially delighted to hear your lap Weim experience. It sounds like Alder enjoying his essential role within the family. How excellent that he is a perfect fit for your family. Thanks for remembering us.

 

At the Beach

With Bella and Company

 

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Bella spends more time traveling than most and she loves every moment.

 

There are times when I long to escape life and one of the best places to accomplish that for me in the Oregon Coast. We have made many trips over the years–but it is never enough. The only thing that is possibly better is to be at the beach with the Weimaraner. I think you might agree. Debbie has Bella and her Levi, too. You might remember them for a while back, but they also sent a couple of fun videos, don’t you agree?

Bella and Levi_20171226_152407148Click Here to read the previous blog post, if you missed it or wish to remind yourself of their most recent news.

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Debbie, for the great videos and sharing your experience. We truly appreciate. We hope you are doing something equally fun on the fine January Sunday.

 

2018 Weekly Synopsis

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

At OwyheeStar

Last week I proudly proclaimed that we are in the process of going through our current Wait List, and eventually, everyone on the list will hear from us. The only folks I have contacted are those in line for a puppy born to the Hollee X Benton 2017 litter.

We are waiting breath abated for evidence of our first 2018 arrival. All too many are standing with us and that includes those wanting a Longhair. We are making every effort to get a Longhair litter or a couple of partial Longhair litters. What do I mean by partial? Well, unless both parents are Longhairs, all the pups in the litter will not be Longhairs. Expectations vary between 30% and 25%; however, we have had litters with a higher percentage of Longhairs. So, it is an average over time and predictions are always the same–not accurate in detail.

2-Hollee X Benton 2017 Week Two

 

We are busy with Hollee’s babies. They receive daily handling and care. We have our current assistant (Christina) who is our granddaughter. What a blessing to be able to have her work with us for a season. She is doing a fabulous bit of work with the pups.  Oh, and I should mention she typically is the photographer for these photo updates.

This Week on the Blog

Here are the week’s posts. Several of these updates were for the Dixie X Boone Litter who recently exited OwyheeStar. It is common that we receive an initial update from nearly everyone who gets an OwyheeStar. As to further updates, it depends on the person. Some folks have extremely demanding work schedules, and their Weim is part of the escape plan–doctors, lawyers, and such. Others, seem to find the time and the desire to keep us apprised throughout their pup’s life. We appreciate everyone’s effort, as we know you do too!

Sunday— January 7 — And there are Two (Winnie meets Colt)
Monday — January 8 — Oakley

Tuesday — January 9 — Dejah Thoris

Wednesday — January 10 — Pushkin

Thursday — January 11 — Sweet Zoe

Friday — January 12 — Liberty Belle

On a very personal note

 

Cliff is still working on the carport enclosure. It is coming along nicely, but even though it looks like a simple project, there is more to it than it appears. I cannot say precisely how many years ago Cliff’s father build that carport, but Cliff was a boy. That gives you some idea. Grandad had a lot of skill, but carpentry wasn’t among his lot. Nonetheless, this structure held steady through last winter when so many structures were damaged or came down due to the heavy snow.
Cliff straightened and made the necessary upgrades to see it through another goodly number of years–way beyond our time.

He plans to move the pile of rocks gathered over the years to a storage location. Later we plan to use them for landscaping. We have not decided yet exactly where or how, but they a part of our heritage. Cliff’s parents were rockhounds. One of my first family memories was going out to the Owyhees to dig for Thundereggs. We didn’t take a jeep. We had a 63 Chevy two-wheel drive pickup. That means it might require us to rock-up to get up the hill. To rock up, you would pick up as large rocks as were needed and put them in the bed of the truck for extra traction. What a fantastic memory it is indeed. People still search for Thundereggs, but it is not like days past. Nyssa, just a few miles south of where we live, proclaims itself the Thunderegg Capital of the World.

We are enjoying watching our one grandson (Brad, a Freshman) playing high school basketball. He is doing quite well which makes it even more delightful. I have mentioned he is a big boy for his age–about as tall as Cliff. He wears size 18 Nikes and is formidable on the court against opponents. As he develops he improves his shot-blocking and rebounding skills; he is not a bad shot either. As you probably know, the taller kids typically are not great ball handlers, but we see evidence he has some talent. In his last game, he got his second Triple-Double. That means he got double-digit counts in all three categories–scoring (14 points), rebounds (13 ) and shot-blocks ( 15). It is so fun to watch him improve–he netted two fouls; he played the entire game. Shortly, basketball season will end, and we will very much miss the opportunity to see him play.

Liberty Belle

Is Home!

     ~ Boise to Las Vegas Flight

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Libby at OwyheeStar

Breeder Comment

We met Julia at the Boise Airport (on Tuesday) where to was ready with her carryon to transport Liberty Belle (Libbie) home to Las Vegas. Yes, some airlines allow you to carry a puppy on the plane–not all. The federal law requires the pup be eight-weeks-old. Most airlines require a health certificate.
Julia has been kind enough to provide us with a glimpse of the experience. We will have segments featuring Libbie and her family introduction. We hope you enjoy the journey.

Julia Speaks of Boise, etc.

 

Libbie did perfect the whole day! Oh my goodness, I can’t believe how well she did!! I took her potty right after you guys left then we hung out in an empty area for a while to play, bond and work off some energy. I put her in the carrier, and that’s where she stayed until we got home. She didn’t put up a fuss, she was relaxed and slept most of the day and flight home, even thru rough turbulence.

Las Vegas Arrival

Scott picked us up at the airport, and she was continued napping for the 15-minute ride home. Once we got home, we went straight to the backyard to potty, ringing the potty bells as we went out the door. She instantly went potty as soon as she got off the patio, both pee and poop. She was praised and given treats, and then we went in for some food, water and family bonding time. Scott is in love with her too! There was no doubt that, our family is complete again :)!

Busy Day; Fun Evening!

We had lots of playtime and several potty breaks, each time she rang the bell to go out! I can’t believe it! At first, we thought it was coincidental because it could be a great play toy, but she went potty every time, except once, when I think she just wanted to go outside to play.  Did you by chance train her with the potty bells? If not, we have one super intelligent puppy :)! I seriously cannot believe how fast she took to that!!

Our First Night

We did our usual bedtime routine and put her in the crate in our bedroom. She pitched a little fit for about 5 minutes and then went to sleep.  She woke up around 2:30 and again around 3,  whined a couple of minutes then she went back to sleep. I had made my decision before bed that if she woke up after 3:30 I would take her our potty. She woke up at 4, I went to the bathroom and then took her out of the crate, rang the potty bells and as soon as her feet touched the ground, she went potty.  We went back to bed, she whined for less than a minute and went back to sleep. It couldn’t have been a better 1st night!!!

Breeder Comment (part two)

Julia, you and Scott, did everything right. Libbie is a lucky girl. No, she was not trained to the potty bells nor even to the door. It would not matter if she were because it was all new territory. We have countless stories (from past experiences) where we had pups housebroken and crate-trained only to hear that their new family was disappointed. Well, there is a trick to doing things, and while it involves follow through, it also takes a bit of knack. It requires the humans to go about business unfazed and matter-of-fact. The moment we humans hesitate the pup reads our hesitation and follows suit.

Libbie is a super smart girl–like her Mama. Ringing the bells upon arrival set the stage. For those that wonder–, you don’t want to ring them like a wild person and make it a scary thing. You want to entice them to want to use them. It is a fun thing. Shortly, it might be abandoned because the pup learns to ring them all too well. (ha!) Who can say? It facilitates the housebreaking process –that is the goal.

Libbie can hold potty for a while. As you saw on your trip home, she didn’t potty the travel bag. When she woke up, she needed to relieve herself. All too many folks are too quick to take their pup out in the middle of the night. Soon, the puppy wants to go every hour or two all night long. For some folks, this pattern continues for months. The concrete-thinking Weimaraner who gets the idea that they go out at night can make life tough for the exhausted puppy family. Habits form readily–good ones and unfortunately, bad ones too!

Getting off to a good start and avoiding the unwanted behaviors is the best approach. We talk a lot about getting the basics done. It cannot be overstated. We hope all of Libbie’s littermates are excelling.

 

 

 

Sweet Zoe

At Home

In our Arms, and in our Hearts!

Spaulding's Zoe2

All is going well with sweet Zoe! She wanted to be held the whole ride home and has ever since been attached. The first night in the crate was rough, but last night showed a lot of improvement. She’s quickly learning where to do her business and has only had a couple of accidents in the house. She’s eating well & showing good signs of playful activity! We played fetch for about 15 min last night (retrieved every time!) and then she passed out! She’s so intelligent!  She’s at home today with the grandparents who are as equally in love as I am.  She is happy and adjusting very nicely!

Spaulding's Zoe1Uh–the Crate

I think the hardest thing is they bond with you and feel they will forever be in your arms from that moment—unless they bound out to do their own thing. Ha ha, Then we darned humans leave them in the crate. Ha

Thank you for all the communication and very easy process! Yes, she is a smart cookie……thank you, Courtney

Breeder Comment

 

Dear Courtney–you are correct. It is the most difficult thing to juggle the bonding and the crate-training. Both are necessary components. If the Weimaraner could choose, they would crawl under your skin next to your heart and make it home. They kind of do that, but it absolutely must be balanced with learning how to be away from you. If not, then bad things happen. These various negative occurrences frequently involve destructive behaviors due to the feeling of being abandoned. The Weimaraner is prone to separation anxiety, and it is so darned easy for us to make it worse. Our good intentions often take us from likely to suffer separation anxiety to a severe case. You are doing the right thing. Ultimately, this will help her learn to adapt and become a better-balanced Weimaraner adult. Of course, that is always our goal.

It is so difficult to remember that our good intentions often lead to behavior issues. Before you go with what seems right, it is always a good idea to ask yourself if this is what is best for the Weimaraner. Friends, family, and even some trainers are quick to offer ideas that might not prove beneficial for the long haul. Keep on the path Courtney. You and Zoe are off to a great start. We could not be happier!

Our Friend Jan

If you live near Jan Magnuson, I hope you can take advantage of her All-Breed Training. She has had the Weimaraner 45+ years, and therefore, she knows a thing or two about the breed. Here are a couple of ways you can learn more about Jan and get in touch with her.

Pushkin

Overall we are doing WellClement's Pushkin3238

I set up the crate – left the door open and Pushkin went right in – kennel arrives on Tuesday. So far only one accident in the house.

Oh, and outdoors we have a little challenge. It is pouring rain here, and the ground is saturated and muddy. Yes, we have grass, but it is that wet. Do you have a recommendation as to something that can be put down as a ground cover?

Wishing you well.
Marie

Breeder Comment

 

Kudos to you for keeping accidents to a minimum. Getting the housebreaking done right early on is vital. You know that! So, that is fabulous.

It doesn’t matter when you get your puppy; there is always some challenge. Wow! That is a lot of rain, but then we are talking Oregon–and not our side of the state either. I suggest you try some sand. It should be OK except for tracking it into the house. Nevertheless, it will help with that mud situation. I wish we could buy two truckloads here, but the rain and mud will soon be history. Afterall, it is far Eastern Oregon–the high desert that is typically arid.

Sand should not be a problem. Removal should be relatively easy once you no longer need it. Scoop up the excess and put it wherever. Wash the remainder into the ground. The cool, wet weather is also ideal for one-celled organisms such as Giardia and Coccidia. Birds and other critters can bring this into your yard, and it can thrive in a wet environment. Therefore, getting a fecal check at the 9-week puppy visit and possibly again at the 12-week visit would be a wise investment. A garden sprayer loaded with 10% bleach solution used in between visits –or even once a day might help eradicate this issue. (No, the bleach will not hurt your lawn.) Sure picking up after the Weimaraner will make a difference; however, there are plenty of ways they can ingest a cyst. Everything goes in the mouth–including their paws.

When a pup leaves OwyheeStar they are parasite free; however, this can change in a blink of an eye. These opportunistic one-celled parasites are in our environment. We talk a lot about avoiding Paravirus infected locations, but most of those high-traffic areas are infected with the one-celled organisms too. The reality seems to be that some Weimaraners are more prone to picking up this type of infection. It is a nasty affair, and it can set back the housebreaking progress. Here’s to hoping everyone escapes this mishap.

The Wire Crate

Marie has purchased the Life Stages Wire Kennel or Crate for Indoor Use. This crate features a divider that allows you to adjust the size. We just wanted to point out the divider and how it works. Excellent job Marie.

Dejah Thoris

Happy New Year!

~No More tiny Girl!

Zimmerly's Dejah
Well our little girl, Dejah Thoris, has grown BIG. Are you sure she isn’t a Great Dane?  She started out as the smallest dog in the litter! She now outweighs her big sister!  We think she stays inside and eats all the food while Ayla goes out hunting and running around in the backyard. They love to snuggle by the fire!
I think I remember Kaiser being the big boy of the litter!  I joke about the Great Dane because I have had three in my past life…wanted another one but my husband said absolutely not. My daughter joked that Dejah is disguising as a Great Dane!
We absolutely love her! She rules the house!  She is still learning the difference between her toys and other good things to chew up (like my husband’s wallet and credit cards!)  we can never be mad at her too long because she is so cute!!!!

Breeder Comment

Thank you, for remembering us. The two make a striking couple of co-conspirators looking innocent fireside.

We are often asked to predict the adult size of the Weimaraner. We can make an educated guess, but as you well see, things don’t always go the way they seem. :O)

Oakley

Adding the Second

Bowmans's Oakley1

We made it safely home yesterday afternoon to Portland.  We were all exhausted after the long drive and Dudley our other Weimaraner was pouting all the way home.  He didn’t quite know what to do with our little one, whom we named Oakley.

Dudley–the resident Weimar

Bowman's Oakley2We made it all about Dudley yesterday and last night.  He got his usual walk by himself and business as usual.  Oakley is intent on following his new big brother.  Wherever he goes he wants to go.   Dudley quickly got used to this but is not ready for Oakley to snuggle with him, as Oakley would like.   They’re also learning to share me as you can see from the photos.  We figure as long as we don’t force the issue that they will get along soon.  They play well together … chasing each other in circles.
Oakley is quickly learning potty training. No accident so far, knock on wood.  We take him out every two hours or so and he does his business and decides to come back in.  He’s learning from his big brother, sit.  I tell Dudley to sit and Oakley seems to automatically do what his big brother does.   It’s quite cute.
We’ll keep you posted on how they progress.  But we’re loving Oakley to pieces.  :).
Thanks!  ~Cathy and Jeremy.

 Breeder Comment

Wow! You are doing so well with the introductory process. I know you are right. Things will continue, and Oakley and Dudley will be inseparable. We look forward to hearing more about the adventures of the two. Keep up the great work.

And There are Two

Winnie Meets Colt

Winnie meets Colt

Here are a couple of pictures of Colt’s first interaction with Winnie.Winnie meets Colt-3

Breeder Comment

We are not sure what her first impressions were.

“What is this?”  “We drove all this way to meet this little blue upstart?” “I don’t think so.”

Despite what she is feeling at the moment, they will become inseparable.

Tips

  1. Meet up in a neutral location. Don’t just show up home with the new Weimaraner.
  2. Don’t let your emotions run amuck. If you are concerned, then the Weimaraner will be equally worried.
  3. Monitor things and give it time. The adjustment is tough.
  4. Make sure the resident Weimaraner gets as much if not more attention than the new baby. Bringing home the new puppy and displacing the original will not go well. They have been at the center of the universe for a while. Why should it change now?