Category Archives: Behavior & Training

Dink

~AKC Puppy Class

First ribbon on the books!

Maybe you noticed that Dink earned his first ribbon and wondered about this program. To learn more—click here!

20 STEPS To Success: The
AKC S.T.A.R. Puppy®
TEST
OWNER BEHAVIORS:

  1. Maintains puppy’s health (vaccines, exams,
    appears healthy)
  2. Owner receives Responsible Dog Owner’s Pledge
  3. Owner describes adequate daily play and exercise plan
  4. Owner and puppy attend at least 6 classes by an AKC
    Approved CGC Evaluator
  5. Owner brings bags to classes for cleaning up
    after puppy
  6. Owner has obtained some form of ID for
    puppy-collar tag, etc.
    PUPPY BEHAVIORS:
  7. Free of aggression toward people during at least
    6 weeks of class
  8. Free of aggression toward other puppies in class
  9. Tolerates collar or body harness of owner’s choice
  10. Owner can hug or hold puppy (depending on size)
  11. Puppy allows owner to take away a treat or toy
    PRE-CANINE GOOD CITIZEN®
    TEST BEHAVIORS
  12. Allows (in any position) petting by a person other
    than the owner
  13. Grooming-Allows owner handling and brief exam
    (ears, feet)
  14. Walks on a Leash-Follows owner on lead in a straight
    line (15 steps)
  15. Walks by other people-Walks on leash past other
    people 5-ft away
  16. Sits on command-Owner may use a food lure
  17. Down on command-Owner may use a food lure
  18. Comes to owner from 5-ft when name is called
  19. Reaction to Distractions-distractions are presented
    15-ft away
  20. Stay on leash with another person (owner walks
    10 steps and returns)

Behaviors

~Habits Good and Bad Take Hold Quickly

Innocence –but there is one in the Group (Haha)

Habits form quickly–once a behavior (good or bad) starts it can soon become habitual. For example, the Weim can become an incessant barking machine. I swear they can bark at a cloud. Maybe it looks like a bird. Incessant by definition means unceasing or Continuing without interruption. Maybe that is an overstatement, but if you have that behavior ingrained, it will not seem an exaggeration.

Barking, digging, territorial behaviors, chewing on everything, and the list goes on–if you allow it in a small dose, it can become a thing. Us humans, often get duped and our efforts undermined.

To prevent that and other unwanted behaviors a person must be vigilant early on. It is not one and done thing either.  The childlike tendencies often last past their third birthday with the occasional teenage behavior surfacing from time to time. I laugh at people who want this breed and expect them to be easy to manage. A lot can and should be accomplished in the first three months; however, you are not home free so to speak. At the same time—getting the basics done right up front will save you a lot of trouble. 

Also consider that the Weimaraner who wants to rule their world can employ growling and snarling. They can withdraw and sulk. They have all kind of ways to get what they want–some are acceptable, others are not. One thing for sure–do not reward or excuse bad behavior.

Boise Foothill Adventures

~Cat Tales and Whatnot

Ellie is still having adventures in the Boise foothills (she’s good at finding chukar and quail for fun) and she loves kayaking/rafting trips.
She’s the queen over all the cats as well.
Bob

Breeder Comment

We are happy to hear that Ellie is still doing well–especially that she is the Queen over all the cats–despite what they report.

Franny

Franny is living her best life.  With work I have gotten creative with my hours and enlisted the help of a few friends with dogs, so that she can keep meeting friends, even if the humans have to remain separate.  Starting Thursday, a couple hours after I leave for work, one of my friends will be picking her up from her kennel at my house and taking her to her hobby farm.  Completely fenced, she will get to run, play with the other dog and meet some farm animals.  She lives better than me!  

We walk every day and other than flopping down when she loves a special spot of grass, she is doing great.  

This dog could not be sweeter.  She is confident but not aggressive, she already know several commands, and I don’t know if it is the NuVet, the food choice or both, but her waste is still firm.  I have never had any dog with as consistent belly as hers.  She is a bit bitey – but I am pretty sure she is teething her big girl teeth, so we are finding every possible thing for her to chew on that isn’t my arm, leg or the sneak attach to my butt!  
I hope you and Cliff are well.  I love reading your daily updates and I this pooch like crazy.  

Breeder Comment

We could not be happier to hear the news that you are getting along so well. Most Weimaraners lead extraordinary lives–often better than their human counterparts. Puppy biting is the bane of getting them raised. Click here to read Anne Taguchi’s article on managing the biting Weimar puppy. Mouthing is also about ownership, and one way the Weimaraner controls their human–think on that a bit. It is charming, but you might want to rethink allowing that behavior if it becomes a thing as she grows out of the puppy biting–shark baby stage. 

The food and supplements we suggest have worked well across the board for so many Weimaraners. It is the truth that no one food is perfect for every dog, but our pups have loved the food, and they consider the supplement yummy. I love the powdered supplement–just my preference. Together, this mix seems to help the immune system and keep the stools better. Weims can have such a finicky tummy–so glad to hear Franny is doing excellent.

Dazee

~ With Sena

Tonite. I expected her to wad it up but she didn’t.

I took her to town yesterday trying to get her used to riding. She hated it, stayed pissed at me the whole time. Would not ride in front with me & when we went to DQ for a cone she said up yours lady, & would have nothing to do with it. Even dragged across her nose. Too bad I had to eat 2. Haha.

Breeder Comment

Weims can be weird. She probably feared you would drop her off–her last trip was when we left her with you. Keep trying, as I know you will–she will learn you are not going to leave her anywhere.

7 Steps To Success

Note: This is a repost of an article we have shared several times. Our pups are ready to acclimate to their new environment upon arrival. We recommend not over-thinking at the early stages.

  1. Be committed — Commitment to the process is primary. Training your pup will take time. Think of this as a journey (a road trip) with a destination in mind. Don’t set timelines; instead, take this adventure together. It will take as long as it takes for each achievement. Sometimes just when you think, you have arrived; your Weimaraner will hit a snag or transitional phase. There are many of these stages in the first couple of years. As with an adolescent, they can be going along well and suddenly regress. Please take this in stride it is nothing personal. The first occurrence could well be prior to week twelve. Stay calm and move ahead–this is how to avoid ingraining fear or some unwanted behavior.
  2. Keep your eye on the young puppy at all times—This is vitally important for at least the first 2-3 weeks, or until you have the housebreaking part accomplished. Use a crate, bag, or soft-side crate to confine the pup when you cannot be vigilant. The crate should not be too large. If it is more than they need they may select one end for a potty area.
  3. Be consistent–Do everything in the same manner! For example, the pup wakes up and stirs. At first, you would pick them up and carry them out to the area where you want them to go potty. Each time you see them circling or rousing from a nap go to the potty-area. If you use the bells hung at the door, then ring them as you go out the door. Soon they will be ringing the bells as a signal for you to open the door.
  4. Keep it simple — Although your pup can learn amazing things, it is best to do a few simple things and build upon those experiences. The process will unfold naturally if you allow it to do so; start with getting them to come. Although they all follow and come to us, it is different once they start to mature. Do the hallway exercise (5-7 retrieves each night). By using a hallway (with adjoining doors closed) there is nowhere for them to escape with the toy, ball, or dummy. Some people treat them when they bring the item to their hand. It is not necessary. The activity is a reward in and of itself. Have a couple of bumpers or toys (designated for this activity). Make it an event every day until you move to the yard because you have compliance.
  5. Keep it fun — Weimaraners are brilliant and learn quickly. A trainer might tell you to work for an hour and even a half hour doing one exercise every night, but we suggest ten minutes. Do it for ten minutes and then do something fun. This approach works for us! If your Weim pup loses interest, you lose ground in the training process.
  6. Remember it is about your relationship — No matter what you are doing it is important to remember that Weims are all about relationship. If they get their feelings hurt, things can go sour quickly. Your bonding experience is vital to the success of this relationship. Take time to think and see things from their perspective. You are the center of their world. They not only want to control you, but they want to own you. Weimaraners are the ultimate Velcro dog and must learn how to stay alone. Your relationship is a double-edged sword. They need a lot of time, attention, and affection. They also need to find ways to cope when you are absent. We recommend starting this process very early, or they will come to expect you will be there 24 X 7. Separation anxiety can be a huge issue in this breed.
  7. Be patient — When you go out to teach your pup a skill, make sure it is a learn-able task. Plan enough time to accomplish the task–but keep your training focused to ten to twenty minutes maximum. The short bursts of success are more effective than lengthy sessions. Your attitude and demeanor play into the equation too! If you are feeling stressed, forego training your Weimaraner. There are many methods of training. Nevertheless, choose one that enhances your bonding experience and one that creates a respectful environment for all concerned.

The best Weimaraner people are those that are natural leaders. Anytime you feel your relationship is stressed then you are going down the wrong road. The persons that are neither too strict nor too lenient are usually, the ones that excel. Regardless of what happens, it is always best to pro-active than to be reactive. Stay calm. Keep it simple. Get results. Plan little steps of learning and build upon them. Try our 7 steps to Success, and we believe you will be on the right path.

Wishing you fewer puppy bites and more puppy kisses

~ Shela and Cliff

Training Advice

~ Jan Magnuson has this to say–

I like Carol Lea Benjamin’s training books, I have not read them all but the ones I have I liked, they are trusty training manuals.  I like Dr. Sophia Yin’s website- she has passed, however they continue to maintain her website; I went to training with her in person, she was amazing.  Also, CanisMajor.com, Pam Young, and PerfectPaws.com.


These are not Weimar-specific, I recommend them to folks with all breeds.  Having owned the Weimar and getting info from Shela and Cliff, I am sure you can tailor the training info to our breed with the knowledge you already have.


Best Regards~  Jan
Jan Magnuson SUNSTARAll-Breed Dog Training
http://sunstardogtraining.com
P.O. Box 98072 Des Moines, WA 98198206 241 2908

Breeder Comment

We believe everyone begins with good intentions–some get into trouble. There are several ways to allow a problem to start with this concrete-thinking Weimaraner. We won’t list those here–we often pass out a sheet that talks about avoiding the pitfalls to our prospective clients–but no matter how you decide to proceed with your training, it is essential to get the basics accomplished.

Everything that you achieve requires you develop a special relationship where the Weimaraner wants to please you. Finally, remember this is a journey–it is about what you can accomplish together — one step at a time building upon tiny successes and that underlying relationship.

NAVHDA Natural Ability Prize One

~ Our Score 112

Hi guys just wanted to drop a quick note. Me and Luna were first alternate and luckily got into the NA test yesterday. 

We surprisingly got a prize 1 – 112 score! Wow. I’m still shocked but she did it all and we trained hard. Now just getting ready for hunting season. 

Mike and Michelle

Information

–The North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association (NAVHDA)

NAVHDA chapters sponsor four kinds of tests:

The Natural Ability Test is designed to evaluate the inherent natural abilities of young dogs and gain insight into their possible usefulness as versatile gun dogs. It rates seven important inherited abilities: nose, search, tracking, pointing, water, desire and cooperation. Dogs are eligible for a Natural Ability Test up until, and including, the day they reach 16 months of age. Dogs over 16 months may be run for evaluation only. Dogs over 16 months may only be run if space is available. No prize classification can be awarded the dog run for evaluation.

The Utility Preparatory Test measures the dogs’ development midway through their training toward the Utility Test. No previous testing required.The Utility Test evaluates trained dogs in water and field, before and after the shot, as finished versatile hunting companions as well as many other specific tasks. No previous testing required. The Invitational Test is our highest level of testing. Only those dogs that have achieved a Prize I in Utility are eligible. This limits the entry to exceptional animals who have demonstrated a high level of training and tests their skills in the advanced work.                 

Breeder Comment on Points Earned

The maximum possible score for a dog running in the NAVHDA Natural Ability Test is 112 Points. You must earn a minimum of 99 points to net a Prize One. Luna got a perfect score–we cannot tell you how difficult it is to achieve this goal. Honestly, it is even more remarkable with the Weimaraner–who can potential flake out at the wrong moment.

To Learn More about competing your Weimaraner with NAVHDA click here!

Going On Vacation?

~Is the Weim Onboard?

Hey, Karen, are you forgetting something? –Like Me!

Separation anxiety is real and palpable –and the consequences are sometimes staggering. We have received notes from people who suffered the worst of outcomes–a loss. Others, and more frequently this is what happens, come home to destruction. The rock-solid trustworthy Weimaraner didn’t handle the absence as expected. Anyone who loves this breed has most likely seen reports outlining shocking Weimaraner behavior. We are positive that many of you have experienced this phenomenon firsthand. (Ouch)

Ideally, we need to help our Weimaraner learn how to adapt and adjust to change. For people new to this breed, this can be a foreign concept. Possibly they equate the Weimaraner separation to what they experienced with another breed–somehow, I highly doubt it. Maybe, but more than likely, this person is going to be caught short–shocked at what can happen. This separation anxiety thing is one of the reasons so many Weimaraner end up being rehomed. It is a sad reality. Nonetheless, many Weimar-addicts walk into the relationship eyes-open knowing about this trait and the other quirks and quandaries they might face.

Meet Frida

~We Are Figuring Things Out

(July 14, 2019)–We were so excited to pick up our puppy (who we have decided to call “Frida”) that I didn’t get to really tell you how thankful we are for you guys!

Frida  initially was not a fan of the car or her crate, but after some quick cuddles on Chase’s lap, she settled right in and spent the rest of the ride in comfort.


Our first night went ok – she did great with potty training until I was too slow getting up this morning and found a sad, poopy puppy. Luckily, she loves baths!


We’re quite in love, the kids are all “taking turns” walking her around our yard and seeing which toys she favors.
We are so happy to have found you guys and are so thankful for this whole process.


I hope you are recovering from yesterday and get at least a little break!
Thank you again, Lauren, Chase, Henry, Emelia, Charlotte, and Frida

(July 14, 2019–after we responded)–Thank you for the advice! We’re open to any and all help!

Yes- and I totally agree! We need to condense her space in the kennel and one of us needs to be better about letting her out. She is in our living room, not bedroom, so she was vocal ALL night about being alone. Therefore making it sort of hard to tell the difference between sadness and needing a bathroom…We’ll keep working on it. She’s had no accidents otherwise.

We’re going to put something in the crate tonight to see if it helps. Otherwise, we’ll get something different and smaller for the time being.
I also may sleep in the room with her tonight to help. 
Finally, we were in the car most of the day yesterday. (We got home at 7:30pm) So, hopefully, after a busy day today, she is much more tired!

 (July 15, 2019)–A much better night! No accidents, quieter, and we found a blanket she loves so she’s happy staying in the crate. We also added a divider to make the crate smaller.

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Lauren, for graciously allowing us to post your experience. Something here could help another person who is struggling. We were so happy to learn you turned a corner–and had the much improved night. We think you are doing great–love to you and Frida.