Category Archives: Bringing home the Weimaraner

Availability

What Is the Most Frequent Inquiry?

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You know the answer to that question. It is about the current availability for our puppies. I pasted in the information I shared not that long ago about how things work. It is not as people imagine. Regardless, I wanted to drop a universal message that we have a couple of males that are not yet promised.

I am not frantic–this type of thing always shakes out as it is meant to be and I have not said much for several reasons. One—we have been insanely busy with the pups, the garden, the farm, and life in general. You understand I am confident your life is similar. Secondly, we only want the right type of inquiry. On the car lot, you have tire kickers–those who spend a lot of time but never are going to buy a car from you. Here, we have puppy-crazed folks who are either looking for the perfect pup and maybe their ideas are off the chart or those who are in love with the idea but they know they are not getting a pup. They can fill out the application and write me somewhere between 50-100 times. They are not willing to invest a small amount to get on our Wait List–that is a clue.

We have a Wait List that leans toward the female. That will color the future availability. Of course, as you read on you will discover we don’t have a clue how things will shake out. What if we get an entire litter of females? It has happened. Then too, what if we get mostly males–we won’t have a pup for these folks. We do have quite a few families who might favor the female, but they are willing to accept a male if that is what they can get. That kind of situations is more natural (and tends to work best of all) because we have so little control over the situation.

Please skip to the bottom to read about our Spring 2018 Status if you read this explanation before. If not, please consider investing the time to understand our situation. Thank you!

Inexplicable Craziness

The inexplicable craziness associated with raising the Weimaraner cannot be precisely defined. Nonetheless, we would like to shed some light on things from our side of the fence. We understand that many folks who come to us in search of the Weimaraner have waited until the eleventh hour and now they are in the hope of finding a pup sooner rather than later. On a rare occasion, we might see ourselves with an available pup upon your inquiry. This scenario could happen if the folks on the wait list are not ready (have a different timeline). There are the other factors too–the sex, the coat color, and the coat length to mention the three biggies. Also, for example, some folks want to hunt upland game, truffles, or sheds. We are looking for the Weims with the most hunt-potential for those engaged in hunting. During our Discovery and Placement Test process, we ascertain whether the pup is more inclined towards scent, and other cues. That doesn’t mean the less hunt-potential pup could not be a suitable hunting companion; however, we hope to place those pups with the Companion Weim folks. Other than the Weim-seeker’s preferences, availability and litters are affected by factors we often have little to no control over.

Heat Cycles

The female’s heat cycle might not be entirely consistent. Certain age-appropriate females will come into season every six months–others not so much. We figure on average any female might cycle about every seven months; however, there are times when our best guess is off. Last winter, for example, all the girls came into heat way behind schedule despite the chagrin of many. The lateness caused the arrival we got to be later and for some people, this time change was not going to work.

Mating Complexities

The complexity of mating cannot be understated. There is a reason we have more than one sire–we don’t keep breeding back to the same lineage. The right sire choice is essential. In some situations, we have had the luxury to use multiple sires; however, many times we have but one option. Or, where we have mixed in the Longhairs, we might have one option if we don’t want any Longhair pups in a litter. For example, Boone doesn’t carry the Longhair DNA marker–whereas, Stackhouse is a Longhair. Any female that carries the Longhair marker and is mated to Stackhouse would produce some Longhair pups. All this planning doesn’t always end up producing a litter.

When You Get Nothing

There are times when a mating happens, and it doesn’t produce pups. We suspect this happens a lot more than anyone talks about because we get inquiries from folks who have waited elsewhere and after two matings they never got a puppy. We also know, as we talked about with the four (from the Callie X Zee litter), not every female is a good producer. Vidalia never produced a single pup despite many efforts. Ginger and Cindee inconsistently produced small litters. Only Mousse produced the average-sized litter consistently. Who would have guessed? The lack of litters from a mating thing is not the end of the challenges.

To list a few other things–some females do not carry the litter to term. You watch their tummy grow, and they miscarry. Yes, it happens to the Weimaraner just as it does to some women. Or the litter might only produce one or two pups. All that time spent hoping, and you have not much to show for it. Those folks waiting for a puppy can become disillusioned. We can experience these feelings too! We have to shake off anything negative quickly. After waiting, and the pups arrive new information is available. Sometimes it is not as we hoped.

Spring 2018

7-Bernie X Boone 2018 Wk4We have the pups–but possibly not what some wanted. You know, the silver-gray female is the most popular choice at this point in time. Many times in the past, we have had a lot of silver-gray females born and everyone seemed to want a blue or a male. We cannot just mate endlessly. We have to have homes for pups–so there is a limit to what we can do. This applies to the workload as well as the placement process. We (Cliff and I) wanted to make you aware that if you are thinking of getting a male, we might have one available very shortly. If you are serious, we would love to hear from you.

Maverick

Celebrating Two Candles!

      ~The All-Around Versatile Weimaraner

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Greetings from San Jose, California! Maverick celebrates his 2nd Birthday today and I wanted to give you an update. He is very energetic and non-stop, like the Energizer Bunny! A little 5-10 minute rest and he is ready for another round. Funny thing… about 8pm at night, he is ready for his snuggles with me on my bed. Once he has about 30 minutes of that, I tell him “it’s time to go to bed” and he jumps down and heads right to his crate.

30581778_10213518101845250_9204332305097687040_nHe has been crate trained since he was a puppy and sleeps in it every night and spends a few hours a day on it as well. Our 13-year-old Weim, Sawyer, has learned when it’s cold it is better to tolerate Maverick and let him cuddle for body heat.

He LOVES going nuts from inside as he sees squirrels and birds out in our yard and does his “cry” to let him out for the chase. Bill, my husband, takes him pheasant hunting and reports that he had the natural instinct the first time he went out in the field last year and this year did an even better job of pointing, flushing and retrieving the birds. He is a fantastic family and hunting companion. Maverick is exactly what we wanted in a Weim and you delivered!

Breeder Comment

We are thrilled Maverick is as advertised (so to speak). I think you folks know we take this process seriously. It is not our first placement with you. Of course, along the way to here and now, you have had a couple of Rescue Weims, too.

We realize that it is a significant risk to trust us to do what is best. Thank you, for your loyalty and this update on Maverick.

Look Into My Eyes

What Do You See?

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We all like to believe we can put our eye on a pup and know more than others imagine. Maybe it is true. Maybe it is a bit of a delusion. One thing for sure, there is more going on between the ears here than what meets our eye. If only we could read the brain waves.

Fifteen plus years ago we stopped doing litter picks. Some people still get miffed, but more often than not our Weimaraner folks like the idea of the Discovery and Placement Process. So, it is a long six-weeks to wait to find out which pup is yours. Despite the waiting, things typically end up as they were meant to be–or so it seems.

There are so many steps between this–

And this!

 

 

The Question

Whiner or Weimar

     ~It kind of Goes Together

 

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Someone says we Gray Ghosts are Whiners. Can you Believe it?

Recently, a friend who will remain anonymous sent we a list of reasons someone dropped a Weimaraner off at a shelter. It didn’t happen in America, but people are people worldwide, I think. This is not a joke. Here are the reasons for which he was being released.

 

  • He wakes up his masters at 7 in the morning moaning ‘ cause he wants to go out while their other dog never gets out before 9
  • The Weim sits moaning while they prepare his bowl while the other dog is silent
  • Also, he moans very loudly when he has to wait in front of the baker to the point that passers-by will return (the abandoned Weimar song! )
  • He also is moaning (loudly expresses his joy) when we put his leash to get out (I understand that the walk in the neighborhood was the only walk to get off)
  • He pulls too much — while madame has tendinitis
  • In every way, he moans too often and it doesn’t go well with Monsieur who has high blood pressure.

No reputable breeder wants a pup to end up in rescue. How do we avoid that? We screen applicants. Regardless, things happen. People sometimes say all the right things. As we often share with folks that say they have done their research, “there is no amount of research that will adequately prepare you for what could arise in the process of raising or living with the Weimaraner.” Honestly, this breed either suits you, or it doesn’t. It is demanding of your time and resources. They simply put are not the a-leave-in-the-yard type of dog.

Marie’s

Pushkin

     ~ The Battle of the Wills

20180311_125527It has been awhile since I have sent you an update. Push is all Weim in every sense of the word. He is a manipulator par excellence! We are still working on the check cord that Cliff recommended. Pushkin will come 90% of the time. It is the remaining 10% that comes to a contest of wills, and mine is stronger! We started puppy classes about 3 weeks ago he is doing well with everything but the “down stay”. Again it becomes a contest of wills. Last week we worked on agility. He did great in the tunnel. I would run, he would run and he would be sitting outside the end of the tunnel waiting for me and of course his treat. He is feisty, stubborn and completely lovable. Thanks so much for the great dog!
Marie
P.S. he now weighs 36.5 pounds.

Breeder Comment

We are so happy to hear you and Pushkin are engaged in various activities. Getting compliance with the recall is vital as you know. All these other things are crucial too! You have the perfect mindset–ah, Pushkin this is happening sweet boy. Thank you, for the update and all your work at raising this lovely Gray Ghost.

Introducing

Bear

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I just want to thank you both again for bringing this little boy (“Bear”) into my life. He had a rough time in his first few weeks of life, and it was questionable if he would pull through. But he is a survivor and is definitely making up for lost time.
We are having a great time bonding and getting to know each other. He is super smart and has already learned to retrieve to my hand (amazing!). He is such a fast learner. I’m impressed. We have many more things to learn together. MVIMG_20180224_190018
You both do a great job and I am thankful for your gift.

I included some cute pics of Bear for you 😍

Breeder Comment

This pup is the little boy who gave us so much concern. A round of antibiotics and he bounced back with no sign of an issue. He has such a great personality. Not every pup gets off to the perfect start. No Breeder wants to talk about mortality rates. Places like AKC publish those statistics. We secretly are thankful our numbers are below average. Nonetheless, no one can avoid every problem. It is impossible.

We are happy that you folks wanted ‘Bear’ even knowing full well about his early challenges. We are blessed indeed to meet some of the planet’s best humans. Thank you, for loving this boy so much.

Life Changing

Remi

         ~ February 28, 2018

Pearson's Remy ArrivesJust had to send you a quick update on how our girl is doing. She is so wonderful! Of course, the puppy stage is extra busy but she is doing so well with house training (only one accident!) and getting used to her crate. Last night she actually slept all night in her crate next to our bed without any whining and woke up so happy.
She certainly has a big personality and she has bonded very well with us so far. She follows me around all day and I just love it (velcro dog :)). It was really cute on the long drive home because she just wanted to be in the back of the car with the kids. They absolutely adore her! I think I told you that my oldest son cried tears of joy for about an hour after we picked her up. He said he just loves her so much already and it is a dream come true. I remember getting our Weimaraner as a kid when I was six and the instant love that I felt for her.
Anyway, thank you again for a fabulous experience and all your work in getting her prepared for the transition. It’s clear that she had an introduction to house training and being in the crate and you’ve made our job easier!
Thanks, Haley

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Haley, for sharing your news. It is more than welcome. We did prepare the pups for their arrival. I cannot claim they are housebroken or crate-trained. We do prepare them to succeed–even then, the transition can be precarious. It is fabulous you are doing so well.
The Weimaraner is home. Memories are being made. How can anyone who has not experienced a childhood Weimaraner understand what you mean? I think it would be impossible.
Click here to read about Cliff’s first Weimaraner. Technology makes it so much easier for us to capture countless photos. We count ourselves lucky to have a couple of photos of Cliff and Doc. Thank you, for being a part of the OwyheeStar family.

Our Mantra

Freedom is Earned

 

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How to Keep an Eye on the Weimaraner Puppy

Here is the thing —once a behavior (good or bad) starts it can soon become a habit. This type of thing can happen quickly like too! The Weim can become an incessant barking machine. I swear they can bark at a cloud. Maybe it looks like a bird. To prevent that and other unwanted behaviors a person just has to be vigilant early on and probably for a number of years.

 

The Weimaraner can remain juvenile-like for three years with teenage flakiness surfacing from time to time. I laugh at people who want this breed and expect them to be easy to manage and hope to get them trained in the first six months. They are not that kind of dog. At the same time, some experience extraordinary success. Their puppy is super intelligent, and their style of follow-through nets the desired outcome. Nevertheless, behavior issues loom large on the horizon.

A lot can and should be accomplished in the first year; however, you cannot achieve whatever and rest on your laurels so to speak. While the adult can seem like the perfect all around dog, it is a bit deceptive. This same dog can freak-out due to separation anxiety and eat the siding off your house. Left alone, they might dig a hole (in fifteen minutes) large enough to park a Jeep underground. Or, you might enter a room or arrive home to find the sofa arm forever gone.

Cliff and I never fail to mention that the breed is characterized by various quirks and quandaries. Nonetheless, for many nothing else but the Weimaraner will do. Many people who give so much to their clients (those working in the medical, criminal, or legal fields in particular) receive a type of therapeutic love from the Weimaraner. All that considered, my mantra is Freedom is earned. Giving a new puppy too much room, or forgetting to make sure they are able to maintain when you are out of the house (or just the room) can prove costly on so many levels.

 

Things To Know

About Parvovirus

     ~From The Animal Foundation

Canine parvovirus (commonly called parvo) is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness in puppies and dogs. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces.

Puppies, adolescent dogs, and adult dogs who are not vaccinated are at risk of contracting the virus. Protecting your puppy or dog from parvovirus could save his life.

Keep your dog healthy and parvo-free with these 8 tips:

  1. Make sure your dog is properly vaccinated. Puppies should receive their first vaccines at 6-8 weeks of age; boosters should be administered at three-week intervals until the puppy is 16 weeks of age, and then again at one year of age. Previously vaccinated adult dogs need boosters every year. Visit The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic for affordable vaccines administered seven days a week — no appointment needed!

  2. Limit your puppy or unvaccinated dog’s exposure to other dogs until he’s had his first two vaccinations, unless you are sure the other dogs are fully vaccinated.

  3. Avoid places where your puppy or unvaccinated dog could be exposed to parvovirus from unvaccinated dogs. Dog parks, pet stores, play groups, and other public areas should be avoided until your dog or puppy is fully vaccinated.

  4. When visiting your vet for wellness check-ups and vaccinations, carry your puppy in your arms outside and leave him on your lap while waiting in the lobby. Walking where other dogs have walked and gone to the bathroom will increase your puppy’s risk of contracting disease.

  5. Parvovirus is very difficult to kill and can live in the environment for over a year. If you suspect your house or yard has been infected, clean with a 1:32 dilution of bleach (1/2 cup bleach in a gallon of water). Regular soaps and disinfectants DO NOT kill parvovirus. Areas that cannot be cleaned with bleach may remain contaminated. Remember, the virus can survive on a variety of objects, including food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors.

  6. If you work or spend time in places where you have contact with dogs, change your clothes and shoes before returning home to your dog or puppy.

  7. If your dog or puppy is vomiting, has diarrhea, is not eating or is lethargic, you should take him to the vet as soon as possible. These are all symptoms of parvovirus. Remember, Infected dogs may show only one symptom!

  8. If you are considering adopting a new dog, we encourage leaving your unvaccinated puppies or dogs at home. It is very important to do a meet and greet, but take the time to make sure your dog is fully vaccinated first!

For more information on canine parvovirus, visit the American Veterinary Medical Association or the ASPCA online. And don’t forget to regularly vaccinate your dog! Click here for The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic Hours and Pricing.

OwyheeStar Comment2-Bernie X Boone 2017 WK3-48

The above post was from the www.animalfoundation.com — which is verbatim from their Website. The dangers of the parvovirus are well documented. While many of these recommendations seem absurd, there is a good reason for the concerns. All too often people unknowingly take their new puppy out to show them off in public–like to the pet store. The same place where the person with an infected puppy visit. Sadly, you have to stay away from this kind of place and pet areas during the first 16-20 weeks. We recommend getting the sixteen-week vaccine titer test for a lot of reasons. One benefit is the test results will indicate if your Weimaraner has immunity or now. You also avoid the potential severe vaccine reaction that affects around 8% of Weimaraners. These vaccine reactions are equally life-threatening. Get the vaccine titer test–if your puppy has immunity then you can out and about sooner. :O)

In twenty years, we have not had a single case of Parvo strike an OwyheeStar puppy. A lot of things have happened, but so far, we have been fortunate. We would like to keep it that way. Many of these symptoms can occur from other issues–for example, parasites. This is especially true of the nasty one-celled varieties like Giardia or Coccidia. Nonetheless, while the symptoms are horrid, it is far more treatable than the parvovirus.

We agree with the dangers of this virus, but for your Weimaraner, we recommend a different vaccine protocol. One that is very similar to that recommended by the Weimaraner Club of America (WCA). If you get a puppy from us, that protocol is found in the OwyheeStar Health Record.

Loki

More about our Adventure

     ~ Part ThreeSAR pupUps and Downs

We had some trouble early on with puppy biting. When I tried to correct Loki he would get angry, which worried me. I’ve since used your advice, Shela—a good screech stops him in his tracks! Since then, I’ve screeched and redirected him to something he’s allowed to chew on, and I haven’t had many issues this past week. I’m keeping Cliff’s trick in reserve in case we have more serious difficulties in the future, but for now, we’re on a good, positive track. Though Loki did well with the crate the first couple of weeks, he’s become more vocal this past week and I’ve temporarily revoked his office privileges (his crate is now in an area where his complaints won’t bother anyone). I imagine his increasing energy levels have something to do with it, so I’m making sure he gets more exercise, and he still gets some nice breaks from his crate throughout the day. I’m hoping this is just a phase, and that he learns that fussing won’t get him out of his crate (I’m also doing work to make sure that his crate is a positive place for him—he just objects to not being the center of attention, I think!).

The Vet

We had a nice visit with the vet for Loki’s 9-week shot. She was impressed with the detailed portfolio you sent and is supportive of the vaccine protocol. She is also happy that I’m feeding the Diamond Naturals Large Breed Puppy Chow with the NuVet supplement. Good news—one of Loki’s testes has descended, and the other was in a good position, so I think we’re going to be just fine on that account. She is also an advocate of neutering closer to the 6-month mark rather than to wait longer.

tasty thumbIn Summary

those eyesLoki and I are getting along quite nicely. He’s already my little adventure buddy, and he’s always up for snuggle time at the end of the day. I love this little guy—he is so intelligent and energetic. Though I wrote a fair amount about training, to Loki it’s all fun and games, and I intend to keep it that way. Thank you for all your help in selecting Loki. We’ll be sure to keep you updated!

Click Here for Part One

Click Here for Part Two

Breeder Comment

Thanks, Erica, for providing so much information about your process and Loki. The photos were outstanding, too! We look forward to hearing from you in the future. Keep up the great work.