Category Archives: Bringing home the Weimaraner




I just want to thank you both again for bringing this little boy (“Bear”) into my life. He had a rough time in his first few weeks of life, and it was questionable if he would pull through. But he is a survivor and is definitely making up for lost time.
We are having a great time bonding and getting to know each other. He is super smart and has already learned to retrieve to my hand (amazing!). He is such a fast learner. I’m impressed. We have many more things to learn together. MVIMG_20180224_190018
You both do a great job and I am thankful for your gift.

I included some cute pics of Bear for you 😍

Breeder Comment

This pup is the little boy who gave us so much concern. A round of antibiotics and he bounced back with no sign of an issue. He has such a great personality. Not every pup gets off to the perfect start. No Breeder wants to talk about mortality rates. Places like AKC publish those statistics. We secretly are thankful our numbers are below average. Nonetheless, no one can avoid every problem. It is impossible.

We are happy that you folks wanted ‘Bear’ even knowing full well about his early challenges. We are blessed indeed to meet some of the planet’s best humans. Thank you, for loving this boy so much.

Life Changing


         ~ February 28, 2018

Pearson's Remy ArrivesJust had to send you a quick update on how our girl is doing. She is so wonderful! Of course, the puppy stage is extra busy but she is doing so well with house training (only one accident!) and getting used to her crate. Last night she actually slept all night in her crate next to our bed without any whining and woke up so happy.
She certainly has a big personality and she has bonded very well with us so far. She follows me around all day and I just love it (velcro dog :)). It was really cute on the long drive home because she just wanted to be in the back of the car with the kids. They absolutely adore her! I think I told you that my oldest son cried tears of joy for about an hour after we picked her up. He said he just loves her so much already and it is a dream come true. I remember getting our Weimaraner as a kid when I was six and the instant love that I felt for her.
Anyway, thank you again for a fabulous experience and all your work in getting her prepared for the transition. It’s clear that she had an introduction to house training and being in the crate and you’ve made our job easier!
Thanks, Haley

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Haley, for sharing your news. It is more than welcome. We did prepare the pups for their arrival. I cannot claim they are housebroken or crate-trained. We do prepare them to succeed–even then, the transition can be precarious. It is fabulous you are doing so well.
The Weimaraner is home. Memories are being made. How can anyone who has not experienced a childhood Weimaraner understand what you mean? I think it would be impossible.
Click here to read about Cliff’s first Weimaraner. Technology makes it so much easier for us to capture countless photos. We count ourselves lucky to have a couple of photos of Cliff and Doc. Thank you, for being a part of the OwyheeStar family.

Our Mantra

Freedom is Earned



How to Keep an Eye on the Weimaraner Puppy

Here is the thing —once a behavior (good or bad) starts it can soon become a habit. This type of thing can happen quickly like too! The Weim can become an incessant barking machine. I swear they can bark at a cloud. Maybe it looks like a bird. To prevent that and other unwanted behaviors a person just has to be vigilant early on and probably for a number of years.


The Weimaraner can remain juvenile-like for three years with teenage flakiness surfacing from time to time. I laugh at people who want this breed and expect them to be easy to manage and hope to get them trained in the first six months. They are not that kind of dog. At the same time, some experience extraordinary success. Their puppy is super intelligent, and their style of follow-through nets the desired outcome. Nevertheless, behavior issues loom large on the horizon.

A lot can and should be accomplished in the first year; however, you cannot achieve whatever and rest on your laurels so to speak. While the adult can seem like the perfect all around dog, it is a bit deceptive. This same dog can freak-out due to separation anxiety and eat the siding off your house. Left alone, they might dig a hole (in fifteen minutes) large enough to park a Jeep underground. Or, you might enter a room or arrive home to find the sofa arm forever gone.

Cliff and I never fail to mention that the breed is characterized by various quirks and quandaries. Nonetheless, for many nothing else but the Weimaraner will do. Many people who give so much to their clients (those working in the medical, criminal, or legal fields in particular) receive a type of therapeutic love from the Weimaraner. All that considered, my mantra is Freedom is earned. Giving a new puppy too much room, or forgetting to make sure they are able to maintain when you are out of the house (or just the room) can prove costly on so many levels.


Things To Know

About Parvovirus

     ~From The Animal Foundation

Canine parvovirus (commonly called parvo) is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness in puppies and dogs. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces.

Puppies, adolescent dogs, and adult dogs who are not vaccinated are at risk of contracting the virus. Protecting your puppy or dog from parvovirus could save his life.

Keep your dog healthy and parvo-free with these 8 tips:

  1. Make sure your dog is properly vaccinated. Puppies should receive their first vaccines at 6-8 weeks of age; boosters should be administered at three-week intervals until the puppy is 16 weeks of age, and then again at one year of age. Previously vaccinated adult dogs need boosters every year. Visit The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic for affordable vaccines administered seven days a week — no appointment needed!

  2. Limit your puppy or unvaccinated dog’s exposure to other dogs until he’s had his first two vaccinations, unless you are sure the other dogs are fully vaccinated.

  3. Avoid places where your puppy or unvaccinated dog could be exposed to parvovirus from unvaccinated dogs. Dog parks, pet stores, play groups, and other public areas should be avoided until your dog or puppy is fully vaccinated.

  4. When visiting your vet for wellness check-ups and vaccinations, carry your puppy in your arms outside and leave him on your lap while waiting in the lobby. Walking where other dogs have walked and gone to the bathroom will increase your puppy’s risk of contracting disease.

  5. Parvovirus is very difficult to kill and can live in the environment for over a year. If you suspect your house or yard has been infected, clean with a 1:32 dilution of bleach (1/2 cup bleach in a gallon of water). Regular soaps and disinfectants DO NOT kill parvovirus. Areas that cannot be cleaned with bleach may remain contaminated. Remember, the virus can survive on a variety of objects, including food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors.

  6. If you work or spend time in places where you have contact with dogs, change your clothes and shoes before returning home to your dog or puppy.

  7. If your dog or puppy is vomiting, has diarrhea, is not eating or is lethargic, you should take him to the vet as soon as possible. These are all symptoms of parvovirus. Remember, Infected dogs may show only one symptom!

  8. If you are considering adopting a new dog, we encourage leaving your unvaccinated puppies or dogs at home. It is very important to do a meet and greet, but take the time to make sure your dog is fully vaccinated first!

For more information on canine parvovirus, visit the American Veterinary Medical Association or the ASPCA online. And don’t forget to regularly vaccinate your dog! Click here for The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic Hours and Pricing.

OwyheeStar Comment2-Bernie X Boone 2017 WK3-48

The above post was from the — which is verbatim from their Website. The dangers of the parvovirus are well documented. While many of these recommendations seem absurd, there is a good reason for the concerns. All too often people unknowingly take their new puppy out to show them off in public–like to the pet store. The same place where the person with an infected puppy visit. Sadly, you have to stay away from this kind of place and pet areas during the first 16-20 weeks. We recommend getting the sixteen-week vaccine titer test for a lot of reasons. One benefit is the test results will indicate if your Weimaraner has immunity or now. You also avoid the potential severe vaccine reaction that affects around 8% of Weimaraners. These vaccine reactions are equally life-threatening. Get the vaccine titer test–if your puppy has immunity then you can out and about sooner. :O)

In twenty years, we have not had a single case of Parvo strike an OwyheeStar puppy. A lot of things have happened, but so far, we have been fortunate. We would like to keep it that way. Many of these symptoms can occur from other issues–for example, parasites. This is especially true of the nasty one-celled varieties like Giardia or Coccidia. Nonetheless, while the symptoms are horrid, it is far more treatable than the parvovirus.

We agree with the dangers of this virus, but for your Weimaraner, we recommend a different vaccine protocol. One that is very similar to that recommended by the Weimaraner Club of America (WCA). If you get a puppy from us, that protocol is found in the OwyheeStar Health Record.


More about our Adventure

     ~ Part ThreeSAR pupUps and Downs

We had some trouble early on with puppy biting. When I tried to correct Loki he would get angry, which worried me. I’ve since used your advice, Shela—a good screech stops him in his tracks! Since then, I’ve screeched and redirected him to something he’s allowed to chew on, and I haven’t had many issues this past week. I’m keeping Cliff’s trick in reserve in case we have more serious difficulties in the future, but for now, we’re on a good, positive track. Though Loki did well with the crate the first couple of weeks, he’s become more vocal this past week and I’ve temporarily revoked his office privileges (his crate is now in an area where his complaints won’t bother anyone). I imagine his increasing energy levels have something to do with it, so I’m making sure he gets more exercise, and he still gets some nice breaks from his crate throughout the day. I’m hoping this is just a phase, and that he learns that fussing won’t get him out of his crate (I’m also doing work to make sure that his crate is a positive place for him—he just objects to not being the center of attention, I think!).

The Vet

We had a nice visit with the vet for Loki’s 9-week shot. She was impressed with the detailed portfolio you sent and is supportive of the vaccine protocol. She is also happy that I’m feeding the Diamond Naturals Large Breed Puppy Chow with the NuVet supplement. Good news—one of Loki’s testes has descended, and the other was in a good position, so I think we’re going to be just fine on that account. She is also an advocate of neutering closer to the 6-month mark rather than to wait longer.

tasty thumbIn Summary

those eyesLoki and I are getting along quite nicely. He’s already my little adventure buddy, and he’s always up for snuggle time at the end of the day. I love this little guy—he is so intelligent and energetic. Though I wrote a fair amount about training, to Loki it’s all fun and games, and I intend to keep it that way. Thank you for all your help in selecting Loki. We’ll be sure to keep you updated!

Click Here for Part One

Click Here for Part Two

Breeder Comment

Thanks, Erica, for providing so much information about your process and Loki. The photos were outstanding, too! We look forward to hearing from you in the future. Keep up the great work.



The Basics

     ~Part Two– Off to a Grand Beginning

  • Learning

play drive.jpgNow that Loki’s had a solid start on the basics (potty and crate training), we’re adding some simple commands. He’s beginning to learn the house rules that my roommate’s dog is expected to follow—sitting and waiting before charging out the door, not jumping up on furniture and being respectful at mealtimes. For the last few days Loki has had to work for his food—he is now responding to “sit,” “down”, “wait”, and “ok!”. When he’s doing well I add something new, and if he’s having a more difficult time I go back and do something easy. I’ve noticed that he’s been more positive and respectful since I began this new meal routine. It also slows down his eating! More importantly, he is learning to settle and look to me– we began with that before I added any verbal commands.

  • Training


elevator rideLoki doesn’t know it yet, but there are some big plans for him. Right now he’s focused on being a puppy, but I’m learning and preparing for training a search and rescue canine.  Loki’s formal training will begin once he’s passed the CGC test. For now, we are working on socialization and doing as many new things as possible (that are safe for him at this age, of course). He voluntarily walked for most of a two-hour hike in the snow, had a blast playing with his toy and riding an elevator up and down, and observed the other dogs during an HRD (Human Remains Detection) training. His best-behaved days are the ones where we’ve done something new and exciting, so I’m doing my best to keep him busy!

Breeder CommentWatch for Part Three. Coming Soon!


The Trip Home

     ~Part One–Our Beginning

calling shotgunIt’s been an eventful few weeks; however, Loki and I had a fairly uneventful trip back home. We stopped by Walla Walla on the way to see my family, who fell in love with Loki—I wasn’t sure they were going to let us leave!

Settling In

There were a few housebreaking accidents the first week… but I’ve learned pretty quickly. So has Loki. He goes to work with me every day and has the office under his spell. He is curious and friendly with strangers, and though he is quiet in new situations, he comes out of his shell once he’s had a chance to take it all in.

Breeder Comment

We are so happy to hear from Erica. She sent us a lengthy update which we will break into three parts. We appreciate her detailed explanation of the experience thus far. There is more at stake with Loki–as he is hopefully going to become a part of the Search and Rescue (SAR) team with Erica. This pup is her first to train for SAR, so there is a lot to consider. Nothing but the best combined with attention to every detail– at the same time she keeps calm and collected. This approach will get the desired result.

Finally, let’s all remember raising your first pup is a growth experience. Well–raising the Weimaraner is always a growth experience. They require you to dig deep and to get ahead of the stuff that comes with as well as to avoid being reactive. (OMG) Well, anyone who has been down this path knows that there are surprises. Some are welcome and others not so much. More than anything, the Weimaraner needs to bond and develop the desire to want to please you. Of course, that doesn’t mean they do not have to obey and achieve specific necessary skills. There are those who became so enamored with their intelligent and engaging pup that in the excitement they forgot this is a journey for the Weimaraner and their human. Respect is a two-way street. We cannot wait to see what Loki and Erica achieve together. It is not a race with a time limit. It is a journey to see what they (Erica and Loki) can accomplish as partners.

Liberty Belle

Day Three with Libbie

    ~ our thoughts and the process–Day Three

Quinci's Libbie Crate_0874

Breeder Comment

You might remember that Libbie traveled home on the airplane (as her Mom’s carry on luggage). We have had two reports since we met her at the airport. Click Here to read the first, and here to catch the second. The news is a bit old, but it is never too late to share this kind of report, right?

I’m still amazed at her intellect and being able to remember!
Yesterday, was very busy, productive and successful :)! She introduced her herself to the crate in the kitchen, her home while we are away from home. I had the door open hoping she would want to go in and explore, and she did, all on her own with no encouragement! She went in, sniffed around and laid down. After a couple of minutes, she got up, went and got her pig ear, went back into the crate and chewed on it until she fell asleep! Precious!!

I quietly closed the door–she did look at me for a moment then went back to sleep. I disappeared for a while, when I came back she was awake, and I let her out. 1st try success! The door remained open, and she would go in several times throughout the day, taking various toys with her. Finally, she went in and went to sleep, no toy or collar, just her. I took the opportunity to actually leave the house to pick up a few things at the store. I was a little nervous leaving her, not really sure what to expect, and it was the quickest trip I’ve been able to make to the store. I was gone for a little over half an hour. When I got home, she was still sleeping! I quietly unlocked the door, and before I could open it, she woke up. I praised her and took her out. Success!! I was relieved! She continued going in and out with various toys and lying down. I would have to say she loves the crate and feels safe :).

She also learned “come” & “sit.” Scott was super impressed and didn’t believe it was possible till he saw it first hand. We also started with leash walking and will continue that until it’s down pat – our next full focus activity. That seems to be the most challenging, but I’m sure she will get it soon.

Last night, we did our regular routine and went to bed usual time. Omg, Shela, when we went into the bedroom, she went into her crate by herself with no encouragement but was praised, I closed the door, she let out a few barely audible whimpers and went to sleep. She did not make a sound all night!! I got up at my regular time, took her out and praised her. Then on with the usual routine. I am in disbelief with how well she did!

She is learning and getting comfortable with things so fast! We have also been learning “no,” and she pretty much has that down, except for with the puppy play biting. During playtime, She’s like a little piranha, mouth open and looking for something to chomp down on.
I’ve figured out so far to put a toy or pig ear in her mouth when she goes for something. We don’t allow her to chew on, aka my hands, shoes, etc. Well, “no” is not working with this, so I think I’m going to try to find another word that will work.

Ahhhh, she’s so funny and just a cutie! What fun we’ve had the last couple days and a lifetime more to go! We are so blessed!!!


News of the Best Kind

Hello from Bremerton, Washington!

Marcous'a Freyja 435Freyja here just checking in. My big brother Odin has a toy I want that he won’t share so I’m up on the couch with mom pouting…lol.
Human speaking now: Freyja is such a joy! She’s adjusted to our little family rather quickly, she has great energy and is very smart & sweet-natured.
Marcoux's Freyja Early 2018-2Odin gets along very well with Freyja, he’s happy he has a friend! He is her playmate and protector always wants to be near her. He is almost kind of taken a parent roll, making sure we are doing our job!. He goes outside with her and shows her where to go potty, even though she is on a long leash if he feels she is going in the wrong direction he just gently guides her with his paw where he thinks she needs to go…lol.
Freyja has really bonded to both Odin and me. Our little family feels complete with her here. Of course, we are running on fumes sometimes as Freyja is quite busy doing her puppy things. She is teething so she bites everything. I keep a toy with me always for a distraction as well as protection…lol. Feeding time is a challenge as she wants to eat out of her brother’s food bowl instead of her Today she gets to go see the puppy doctor to get her next round of shots. Big brother gets to go too, he’s just gonna love that!…lol. killing two birds with one stone works for us though. Anyway, I could go on and on…thank you, Shela & Cliff, for all of your help and support and of course for our Freyja!! You guys have helped make this such a positive experience and we sincerely appreciate all that you do! Have a wonderful day! Jeremy, Jessica, Odin & Freyja💗💗
PS: Just got back from the vets, she now weighs 18.2 pounds. The doctor and staff are in agreement with the shot protocol. She fell asleep during the exam she was so calm!!

Liberty Belle

Is Home!

     ~ Boise to Las Vegas Flight


Libby at OwyheeStar

Breeder Comment

We met Julia at the Boise Airport (on Tuesday) where to was ready with her carryon to transport Liberty Belle (Libbie) home to Las Vegas. Yes, some airlines allow you to carry a puppy on the plane–not all. The federal law requires the pup be eight-weeks-old. Most airlines require a health certificate.
Julia has been kind enough to provide us with a glimpse of the experience. We will have segments featuring Libbie and her family introduction. We hope you enjoy the journey.

Julia Speaks of Boise, etc.


Libbie did perfect the whole day! Oh my goodness, I can’t believe how well she did!! I took her potty right after you guys left then we hung out in an empty area for a while to play, bond and work off some energy. I put her in the carrier, and that’s where she stayed until we got home. She didn’t put up a fuss, she was relaxed and slept most of the day and flight home, even thru rough turbulence.

Las Vegas Arrival

Scott picked us up at the airport, and she was continued napping for the 15-minute ride home. Once we got home, we went straight to the backyard to potty, ringing the potty bells as we went out the door. She instantly went potty as soon as she got off the patio, both pee and poop. She was praised and given treats, and then we went in for some food, water and family bonding time. Scott is in love with her too! There was no doubt that, our family is complete again :)!

Busy Day; Fun Evening!

We had lots of playtime and several potty breaks, each time she rang the bell to go out! I can’t believe it! At first, we thought it was coincidental because it could be a great play toy, but she went potty every time, except once, when I think she just wanted to go outside to play.  Did you by chance train her with the potty bells? If not, we have one super intelligent puppy :)! I seriously cannot believe how fast she took to that!!

Our First Night

We did our usual bedtime routine and put her in the crate in our bedroom. She pitched a little fit for about 5 minutes and then went to sleep.  She woke up around 2:30 and again around 3,  whined a couple of minutes then she went back to sleep. I had made my decision before bed that if she woke up after 3:30 I would take her our potty. She woke up at 4, I went to the bathroom and then took her out of the crate, rang the potty bells and as soon as her feet touched the ground, she went potty.  We went back to bed, she whined for less than a minute and went back to sleep. It couldn’t have been a better 1st night!!!

Breeder Comment (part two)

Julia, you and Scott, did everything right. Libbie is a lucky girl. No, she was not trained to the potty bells nor even to the door. It would not matter if she were because it was all new territory. We have countless stories (from past experiences) where we had pups housebroken and crate-trained only to hear that their new family was disappointed. Well, there is a trick to doing things, and while it involves follow through, it also takes a bit of knack. It requires the humans to go about business unfazed and matter-of-fact. The moment we humans hesitate the pup reads our hesitation and follows suit.

Libbie is a super smart girl–like her Mama. Ringing the bells upon arrival set the stage. For those that wonder–, you don’t want to ring them like a wild person and make it a scary thing. You want to entice them to want to use them. It is a fun thing. Shortly, it might be abandoned because the pup learns to ring them all too well. (ha!) Who can say? It facilitates the housebreaking process –that is the goal.

Libbie can hold potty for a while. As you saw on your trip home, she didn’t potty the travel bag. When she woke up, she needed to relieve herself. All too many folks are too quick to take their pup out in the middle of the night. Soon, the puppy wants to go every hour or two all night long. For some folks, this pattern continues for months. The concrete-thinking Weimaraner who gets the idea that they go out at night can make life tough for the exhausted puppy family. Habits form readily–good ones and unfortunately, bad ones too!

Getting off to a good start and avoiding the unwanted behaviors is the best approach. We talk a lot about getting the basics done. It cannot be overstated. We hope all of Libbie’s littermates are excelling.