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Sixteen Weeks

Manfred

     ~The Titer Test Happened

Manfred @ 16 Weeks-11

I was getting ready to have sixteen candles when I learned that you don’t get them for sixteen weeks. Seriously, I don’t think that is right. (Woof!) Okay then, how about sixteen cupcakes. That works. Instead, Shela and Cliff loaded me into that thing they call the Patriot–is’s a large white rolling wagon. We drove to Nampa, Idaho. They said it was a big deal I meet Dr. Calhoun. I don’t see what the fuss is all about, myself.

They talked on about me getting a Vaccine Titer Test (to be sure I am protected). No one said there was a needle involved. They took some blood. My Mom and Dad dropped some cash –don’t you get money for donating blood? Just asking a simple question here and thinking we could stop for ice cream with the coin earned!?!

Bridget loved me and said I had the best personality ever. Cliff and Shela were chatting on like old friends with this Bridget woman. Seriously, she is the one that stuck me with the needle. I think it is a conspiracy. Dr. Calhoun said I was the whole package–testicles are down, too! I guess that is a big deal. What did they expect?

Greta-12Cliff made all these promises that girls would fawn over me at the Idaho Veterinary Hospital, but it was pretty darned empty. I saw three or maybe four hot chicks. Oh and then there was that Greta girl. I think she is a bit odd as birds go. I didn’t give her a look and seriously why was Mama Shela get all up in her face and fuss over this silly bird? She plucks her feathers–what’s up with that.

I guess you could say there is a Stripper Bar at the Idaho Veterinary Hospital in Nampa– look at this nut case. (Woof!) For some reason Mama Shela loves this silly Parrot.

Breeder Note:

Yes, we drive to Nampa, Idaho. Dr. John Calhoun and his expert staff are worth the drive. Manfred is Longhair Weimaraner–our newest Stud Dog. Many of our females (the Longhairs as well as the Longhair Carriers) are related to Stackhouse, our current Longhair Stud Dog. By the way–Stackhouse will be eight years old this November. His siring days are numbered–he has a couple of good years left at least. The biggest issue is we don’t breed back to the same lineage–Stack is related to most of these girls that will produce the Longhairs. Without Manfred, we would be very limited in our ability to produce those Longhair puppies. That would be a sad reality.

Extending our Time

Delicate Discussions

   ~ Part Two

5-Hollee X Benton_4942

Last Friday we discussed the accidental loss of the Weimaraner. One of those haunting and gut-wrenching scenarios that stick with you forever. Of course, we have to be ever vigilant and make sure they are as secure as it is possible. There are; however, other considerations that may well extend your pup’s chance of survival.

No one wants to consider that they might lose their puppy sooner rather than later. While there are no guarantees there a few things we can do to increase the potential longevity.

  1.  Be cautious with the vaccine — we recommend never doubling up the vaccine. That means if you are planning to get an annual DAPPv (Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1 (Hepatitis), Adenovirus Type 2 (Respiratory Disease), Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus) do not combine it with Lepto, Kennel Cough Protection, or the Rabies. It may be your Vet’s standard protocol, but spreading them out is less of a hit on their immune system. (Getting the Lepto only vaccine also gives you greater protection against Lepto).8-Bernie X Boone WK1-22Follow the suggested OwyheeStar puppy vaccine protocol and get a titer test instead of the typical sixteen-week puppy shot. Getting the titers checked for immunity is the smart approach–even if your puppy has shown no sign of being vaccine reactive. Most Weimaraners who have a severe, life-threatening reaction to the sixteen-week shot never had a problem with any previous puppy vaccination. The vaccine titer costs a bit more but nothing in comparison to developing an ongoing immune system issue.

    After the one-year booster, you might consider (down the road) checking the titers again to see if they are still immune. Many professionals have come around to the idea that the DAPPv protection often lasts three years or even longer. The beautiful thing about a titer test is you can find out their immunity level. The unnecessary vaccine could be a potential trigger to a serious health issue.

  2.  Be as Holistic as possible. There are different approaches to Veterinary care. According to the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA)  holistic medicine humane to the core. The techniques used in holistic medicine are gentle, minimally invasive, and incorporate patient well-being and stress reduction. Holistic thinking is centered on love, empathy, and respect. Click on the link in this paragraph to learn more about this approach to Veterinary medicine.
  3.  Medications–some are not as safe as others in our opinion and experience. 20229379_10155028879813305_8042793045446538520_nRimadyl (carprofen) and its generic counterpart Novox Carprofen are something we are not comfortable using for the Weimaraner. You never know when it is going to have a serious adverse side effect–in our case and that of two other OwyheeStar clients experience it led to severe and uncontrollable seizures. There are alternative anti-inflammatory medications. Whenever possible, we recommend you avoid Rimadyl. If it becomes necessary, then try to reduce the dosage or get off it as soon as possible. To manage or to prevent this situation; however, requires that you advocate because it is most usually the go to drug of choice after surgery or when facing arthritic situations.
  4. No one food is right for every Weimaraner. A quality grain-free food is our suggestion, and we are not speaking about one of these premium brands that touts all kind of additives. We believe in adding a quality supplement in the right dosage and staying away from foods that claim they add these things. Why? You might ask. Well,  supplements get old, and even dog food needs to be fresh. Also, how do you know the quality of the additives? You don’t. Stick with the basic quality food and add something that is proven and has excellent quality control. Keep in mind, many of the Big Name Brands are not as high quality as you might think. Your pocketbook may not be able to afford a raw food diet, or the best dog food money can buy. You can provide basic quality food. The right food is apt to help them live longer.
  5. NuVet--we cannot say enough about this supplement. The only caution we have is for young pups. Too much of a good thing can be counterproductive. We suggest you follow our recommended protocol. A small amount of the NuVet powder sprinkled on the young Weimaraner’s food every day will make a big difference. It might take time to see results if you have existing problems, but there are many testimonials including the one we received last week from Mary.  (Click on the NuVet  link below to learn more about this supplement.)

    She writes. PS – when we got Olli we started both dogs on Nuvet. Rudi had horrible allergies but they steadily improved over the last 2 years to the point of not needing any medication. Coincidence?  I think not. We are sold on the benefits.

  6. Bloat is a complicated and somewhat mysterious life-threatening situation. We are going to refer you to an article (rather than addressing it ourselves).  Click Here to find out more about the risk of bloat, thank you!
  7. Insurance–the pros and cons of having it. We believe you should invest in some kind of major medical coverage. Eventually, the athletic Weimaraner is going to need extreme Veterinary or special care. Sometimes this happens early in life–a torn ACL, etc. There is the threat of bloat (as mentioned above) in this breed, too! We cannot speak to which insurance company pays the best. Our Vet Office has their favorite company because they say they pay quickly. Some people say that if you get the insurance up front that the first year is nearly a wash. Many policies cover the vaccine, general care and then you have the cost of the spay or the neuter. (Typically, there is a set allotted amount to cover basic visits in some of these policies–each one is different).
  8. Do your research, but keep in mind that many of these surgical procedures cost Crane's Lucy4$2,000 and up. Insurance doesn’t negate your personal responsibility. We might forget we are the gatekeeper and in the heat of the moment simply say do whatever is needed. Insurance means it might not be a cost consideration–in the midst of a crisis, your Weimaraner may receive medication that leads to other issues. Everyone just wants to trust their Vet to do what is right. We understand. Nevertheless, it is important to always keep in mind that they are treating all breeds and a lot of mutts. Each Veterinary fur client is important, but they are not all equally sensitive to certain vaccines, medication, etc.

Thank you, for doing the best by your Weimaraner. We appreciate every sacrifice made for our OwyheeStar offspring. We work with the best Weimlovers in the universe. How privileged we are!?!

The photos we added are not directly related to loss–just a reminder of what we value.

 

 

 

Elio

At 16 Weeks

Lorenzen's Elio June 23 2017Elio continues to be an absolute joy and an incredible addition to my little fur family!  He’s a calm, well-mannered puppy who picks up on things incredibly fast! We’re going into week 3 of puppy classes and he’s doing great! 🙂

Breeder Comment

Vaccine Crossroad

A Reminder to Proceed with Caution

The Sadie X Stackhouse Litter will celebrate their sixteen-week birthday on this coming Sunday (June 25th). That brings everyone to a crossroad. By now a lot has happened, and everyone will have found themselves insanely busy raising their Weimaraner. The Weimaraner’s (and the OwyheeStar) Vaccine Protocol can have been forgotten.

Your Veterinary office will have a different (broad-based) vaccine protocol. Even if they agree to follow the recommendations, it will fall on the pup’s owner to remember these details. We suggest putting the dates on your calendar and ignoring the Veterinary office alerts. Otherwise, it gets very confusing. If you have forgotten the protocol read on1

 

  • 6-Week NEOPAR® Puppy Shot(given at OwyheeStar)
  • 9-Week *Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • 12- Week *Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • Other vaccines such as Lepto and Kennel Cough (Bordatella) should be given as needed–and avoided when possible. We recommend not combining these shots with any other vaccine–, especially rabies. Vaccine challenges the immune system to build antibodies; therefore, we strongly encourage you to space Lepto, Bordetella, and Rabies vaccination at least two weeks apart. We realize that many veterinary practices give multiple vaccinations at a single visit; however, this approach is easier on the immune system. If a reaction does occur, then you know what caused it and plan to avoid it in the future. Yes, we understand this is a more costly approach–avoiding the risk is worth it!
  • 16-Week Crossroad <== Opt for the Vaccine Titer Test instead of automatically getting another puppy shot. Your Vet is going to recommend just doing the shot because that is typical for the all-breed approach; however, a percentage of Weims are vaccine sensitive. Although your pup probably never had a reaction before, please do not ignore this warning. Even a mild vaccine reaction can trigger immune system issues–some of these lead to on-going health problems and in certain instances death. It is not worth the risk! The vaccine titer test runs more than double the cost of the typical puppy shot, but it might save you thousands over time as well as the potential heartache. Almost without exception, our protocol has been producing immunity by week sixteen, which means your puppy doesn’t need any more essential vaccine. If you need the optional vaccines (Bordetella or Lepto) these can be done; however, please space them at least two weeks apart from the Rabies.
  • Vaccine Blog Post   For the OwyheeStar Client Only click here! (requires password)

PUPPY VACCINE CLARIFICATION (Lepto)

There is a significant push by the Veterinary community (due to the recent rise of Lepto) to include Lepto in the puppy shot. The Weimaraner Club of America (as well as others who study this breed) recommend you wait to give the Lepto, etc. until the puppy shots are completed. The puppy shot should not include Lepto or Corona. No other vaccine should be combined with the puppy shot. Waiting for the Lepto, Bordetella, and another vaccine until the pup is a little older is less risky. It takes more effort and costs a bit more to space the vaccine, but is worth it.

What is the DAPPv?

Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1 (Hepatitis), Adenovirus Type 2 (Respiratory Disease), Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus (Click Here to read more about the vaccine we use. Remember the Puppy Shot should not contain the Lepto or Corona.

OwyheeStar Disclaimer

The Weimaraner Club of America (WCA) Vaccine Protocol

We are neither Licensed Veterinarians nor Licensed Veterinary Techs. Our recommendations are based on twenty-plus years breeding the Weimaraner (exclusively) as well as the breed recommendation (from the Weimaraner Club of America). Ultimately, you have to decide what is the best approach. This protocol is considered a more Holistic and safer approach. That being said, our advice cannot replace that of your Veterinary of choice. 

Chloe

At 7 Months

Foss's Chloe_1306

Hello!

My how time flies! Our Chloe (from Hattee x Stackhouse) is now almost 7 months old and we can hardly believe that she’s been with us 5 months. You don’t quite realize as it’s happening but she has grown so much. We did her 12 week puppy shots then the 16 week titer check which showed positive antibodies so didn’t need the 16 week shots! She got her Rabies shot at 6 months and other than being a little lethargic the day after seems to have tolerated it well, she weighs 46.8lbs. Does that seem about on track for her age? I have hundreds of pictures but tried to narrow down for this update but will send more. The attached are of her sitting pretty for a photo at 9 weeks and 6 months.
She is so smart and has a very good recall-largely achieved in the early stages with the use of treats/praise for coming when called and now occasionally gets a treat reward but always praise. She walks calmly with loose leash about 60% of the time (our work is ongoing). We were prepared to put in a lot of effort for ongoing mental and physical exercise and I believe it’s been paying off. We have our pre-meal routine of 20 minutes playing fetch then 10-15 minutes obedience training before she gets breakfast/dinner.
Foss's Chloe_0641

Nine Weeks

We are so thankful that we crate trained her from day one and she now voluntarily naps in her crate and sleeps in it 3-4 nights/week (yes she sleeps on the bed with us the other nights). Chloe also spends some alone time in her crate often; whether its for an hour while we run to the store, half hour while I clean floors or sometimes for several hours while I’m sleeping during the day between work shifts. Overall Chloe is so incredibly sweet and has been such an amazing addition to our home and I cannot imagine life without her. We are immensely grateful for this wonderful Weimaraner puppy and have even started talking about when to add a 2nd-we think maybe once Chloe is about a year old.

Foss's Chloe_1344

Six Months

I have whole collections of photos/updates about our trips to the Sandy river delta dog park, to the coast, and hiking around that I’ll send in additional emails in the next week or so in better format if you would like to include them on the OwyheeStar website. Hope you and Cliff are well and enjoying some spring weather!

Take care,
Brittany, Don, and Chloe

Breeder Comment

Thank you for the great update. It was good to hear you followed the vaccine protocol. As you can see, the Rabies is a very powerful shot. The Weimaraner Vaccine protocol, which ended at the twelve-week puppy shot (no Lepto) was more than enough to provide protection. It is well known that a percentage of Weimaraners have a severe reaction to the sixteen-week puppy shot–even when they have no response to previous vaccinations. We always believe it is better to be safe than sorry. In addition, there are many unknowns. Who can say what the vaccine reaction (evident or not) causes behind the scenes. We wholeheartedly believe in vaccines but the right protocol is a must.

Your training accomplishments are admirable. We know it requires digging deep and staying the course. It is so worth it. Keep up the great work. It is paying huge dividends. We look forward to working with you again.

Endless Energy

Maverick

Hope all if well in Weim land!  Maverick is now a little over 6 months old and is FULL of endless energy!  He is a smart puppy, a little too smart if you ask me!  Maverick is a true Weim, through and through with his antics and personality.

Training

He is in training and doing well.  He likes to jump up on people and nip, so we are working on that.  He loves to run and fetch and run some more… and then some more.  I seriously do not know where he bottles all of his endless energy.  Bill will be working him in the field this Pheasant season with our older Weim, Sawyer, almost 12 years old.  He is showing great potential as a bird dog and we are looking forward to seeing what he can do, especially since Sawyer will be retiring from the field after this season.

Vaccine Question

I wanted to ask you a question about Weims and shots.  Do you recommend Maverick getting a shot for Kennel Cough?  Most of the places I am looking into for doggie day care to get him more socialized with other dogs require dogs to have this shot to protect the.  I just wanted to check with you and see your thoughts.

~Jennifer

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Jennifer, for the update. We really love the photos you sent along with the update. You pose a good question.

Weimaraner Club of America (WCA) Vaccine Protocol Recommendations–click here!

The use of Corona, Leptospirosis, Bordatella and Lyme vaccines are not recommended unless these diseases are prevalent in the area; and should never be administered along with the core vaccines listed above, but rather separately, and at a time when the pup’s immune system is mature. Rabies vaccinations should be given as required by law, but not coincident with other vaccinations. If possible, wait until the puppy is older than 16 weeks.

We recommend vaccinating your Weimaraner. That doesn’t mean throwing every vaccine possible at them. It does; however, say that they need a Weimaraner friendly vaccine protocol.

You have to be the keeper of the Weimaraner’s vaccine protocol. Ultimately, you decide because the Veterinary practice most likely will offer (and in most cases encourage) additional vaccine. This broad-based Veterinary Office Vaccine protocol may suggest doubling up on vaccine–more than one vaccine at the same visit. We recommend you separate vaccine–one to a visit. That means you would not get any other shot when you get the Rabies, and then–you would wait for at least two weeks before getting another vaccination, such as the Bordetella. It would be wise to wait for more than the two weeks in our opinion.

As for the Bordetella (Kennel Cough ) vaccine. If you are going to be doing classes, using daycare, or even frequenting the dog park, it is probably in your best interest to get them vaccinated. Fall is a good time to consider the Kennel Cough protection. Like the flu and cold season, fall, winter, and early spring are the time to expect an outbreak.

Disclosure–Cliff and Shela Nielsen are not licensed Veterinarians or Licensed Vet Techs. These recommendations are based on the WCA vaccine protocol which is developed with the Weimaraner’s best interest in mind.

The Weimaraner and current Vaccine Concerns

Ripped from the Headlines

11134166_10206301045794832_7089835874738168121_nEven the thought of a current canine flu epidemic making the rounds,  is apt to send shivers down our spine. Signs declaring risk of exposure shakes us to our core.  Our pets are one of the most important things in our life. Their importance would be akin to food, water, air, and life-sustaining other stuff. They are family–for some; they are the only family. They share our bed, and our secrets. What could be more intimate?

The Canine flu is scary. The whole idea of protecting our beloved Weimaraner begs us to find something that ensures they are safe. Vaccine is normally the first thing mentioned when a topic like arises.  Vaccine has changed the landscape of society, but it is not the answer for everything. I will be forever thankful that is thwarted epidemics like polio, small pox, and the like. Nevertheless, when it comes to the Weimaraner, vaccine is always a concern. Our recommendation is to avoid unnecessary vaccine–this means you have to determine which is absolutely necessary, and which is optional. It is to you to know what is best for your beloved Weimaraner. We know how tough that is, and most of us want to (solely) rely on our vet’s opinion. This could prove precarious at times. Most of you know it was hard to find a vet to agree to doing the titer test, in lieu of an automatic sixteen-week puppy shot, but this is important. Secondly, (whenever vaccine is called for) we recommend not combining shots. We know it is a common practice to have a Rabies, and a booster. We suggest you separate them at least by two weeks–longer is preferable. Never get a Bordetella (kennel Cough) shot with any other shot. Make sure you really need the annual booster; new studies show that vaccine protects your pet longer than they used to think. Keep the jolt to the immune system at a minimum, and work on building immunity.

Vaccine’s Dark Side

According to many experts, vaccination causes immune suppression … and that’s one really big reason why you probably should avoid the flu vaccine. This fact also sheds light on the Weimaraner vaccine protocol. Click here to read more from OwyheeStar.

Media and Dog Park Officials Sound and Alarm

dog-flu

The Dog Flu Epidemic: The Real Truth

Have you taken your dog for a romp in the local park, only to be stopped in your tracks by a sign warning dog owners to enter at their own risk because of a disease striking down dogs at epidemic proportions?

If you live in the Chicago area, you’ve probably seen these signs:

CHICAGO PARK DISTRICT NOTICE: 

CANINE INFLUENZA VIRUS IN CHICAGO 

The Canine Influenza Virus (the “Dog Flu”) is causing illness throughout the Chicago area. All unvaccinated dogs may be at risk. Even dogs showing no sign of illness may carry this virus. 

PLEASE ENTER THIS DOG FRIENDLY AREA (DFA) AT YOUR OWN RISK 

Click Here to read the whole story….

Featured Weimaraner — Goose

IMG_0161aGoose is doing great.

He has learned the words sit, stay, drop, five and toy very well. I am very impressed with how quick he learns.

0605131637bPuppy Teething Happens

He has lost two front teeth and I see a new tooth already poking through!0522132126a

He is driving us nuts right now.

I can see why people can get overwhelmed, and feel like giving up but he is not our first toddler.

No 16 Week Puppy Shot Needed

His titer test scored 160 and he needed 80 to be protected from parvo so we are skipping the 3rd vaccination.0620131300

In case you get the question again, his first bag of Diamond Pet Large Breed 40lb lasted 2 months. We hope you enjoy these photos. They aren’t the greatest shots, but you are free to use them if you wish.

Breeder’s Note: We are happy to learn that the vaccine protocol we are using is more than adequate. In this case, it was double what is required for the pup to be protected. The importance of doing the titer test in lieu of over vaccinating cannot be overstated. For many years, the Weimaraner Club of America (WCA) has warned breeders (as well as new puppy owners that the 16-week shot is usually not necessary. In fact, the potential risks associated with the 16-week puppy shot are documented. These risks, can be life-threatening, or lead to ongoing health issues; specifically, a vaccine reaction could result in on-going immune system problems, HOD, etc.

Raising the Weimaraner is a lot of work. It is not something you can approach in a casual, or hit-and-miss fashion. Getting the first steps right is imperative. Guarding against bad habits, by supervising the young Weimaraner is important. Once the less than desirable habitual act begins (whether it is digging, chewing the house-siding, barking incessantly, and the list can go on) it is hard to turn back the clock. This is why we tell people not to think about letting the Weimaraner potty inside ever. Some people feel the pee-pee pads are a great idea, and yes the Weimar would enjoy shredding them. They might even use them, shred them, and ingest them. It is disgusting. Forget having an inside potty of any kind. It is not the smart thing with this breed.

These are not the pups you can throw in the backyard, or put in an outdoor kennel. Doing either of those things, is most likely going to damage your relationship. Certainly, if nothing else, it is going to stunt the development process. The Weimaraner is all about the relationship. They are never happier than when they are touching you. If you are looking for a dog you can train in a few weeks, and expect them to become low maintenance, this is not the breed for you. Their intelligence, and manipulative behaviors are well known to those who reside with them. Seriously, it is hard to imagine what it is like until you live with one of these complex creatures. That being said, even though they disrupt our lives in ways we might at time prefer to avoid, they are very addictive. You are either a Weim-nut, or not. There doesn’t seem to be any middle ground.