Category Archives: Playdate

How It Began

This Fall Marks Two Years

     ~ Here is that first Christmas photo for Cliff and Shela

Meet Up Beginning

Here is the photo captured for Cliff and Shela

Two years ago this fall Holly (unknowingly) arranged an event that would lead to our monthly play dates. Holly & her Mother (who is a professional pet photographer) set out to get as many Owyheestar Weims together to take a Christmas photo for Shela and Cliff.

It was amazing and those of us who came had to have more, to see that many Weims in one place! I would never have dreamed it would grow to what it is now, we had 24 Weims at one of our events!
Some of talked about getting together again, a few months later Holly invited someone to her mother’s house to play. I not only invited myself to go but offered to host as well as arrange a meal to share; thus the monthly play date was born!
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One Crazy December

From that day forward we’ve only missed one month (December, due to crazy schedules!). Some times we do Saturday, sometimes Sunday, we always share food and there are several friendships that have formed that extend well beyond the play dates.

Support, Sharing, and So Much More

We’ve lost some dogs, seen several humans go through surgeries or illness, used each other as sounding boards and support. The family that we have formed through the Weimaraner breed is priceless. Our family very open and welcoming, we all come from very different beliefs and backgrounds but we all have Weims in common and that has been enough to support our family!

Play Date turned Camp Out!

         ~August 26 – 27th

If anyone is too far out of the Salem area, you are always welcome to crash at our house.
This month we are trying something different, we are hosting a camp out–Saturday, August 26  to Sunday the 27th. We will be BBQ-ing, roasting marshmallows & hopefully, someone will bring a guitar & will lead us in song! Bill will make his famous waffles for breakfast!

You are Invited to Join in the Fun

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If you wish to join in the fun, contact me via text, email, or on Facebook to get the details. We are very excited about the upcoming camp out. ~ Nancy

Nancy Garin, Owner
Garin Maintenance LLC

(503) 930-6226

WWW.GarinMaintenance.com
nancy@garinmaintenance.com 

Breeder Comment

What can we say? We cherish the photo–all but one of those Weims originated from OwyheeStar. We have been privy to other photos and stories. There have been connections made and Weimlovers helping Weimlovers. Isn’t that grand? Thank you, every one who has graciously remembered us in any way. We truly appreciate the recommendations, referrals, and your endorsements.

We are happy so many of you can participate. Nancy and Bill are gracious hosts. Thank you, every one who has graciously remembered us in any way. We truly appreciate the recommendations, referrals, and your endorsements.

 

Dog Park

Fun and Yet…

The AKC has an article on the ailment known a Kennel Cough (also known as canine infectious tracheobronchitis).

What Is Kennel Cough?

Kennel Cough (also known as canine infectious tracheobronchitis) is a highly contagious respiratory disease. Dogs commonly contract kennel cough at places where large amounts of canines congregate, such as boarding and daycare facilities, dog parks, training groups, and dog shows. Dogs can spread it to one another through airborne droplets, direct contact (e.g., touching noses), or contaminated surfaces (including water/food bowls). It’s highly treatable in most dogs but can be more severe in puppies younger than six months of age and immunocompromised dogs.

Should You Use the Dog Park?

IMG_2996Recently, we heard about a young OwyheeStar Weimaraner who has a severe case of Kennel Cough which is now progressed to full blown pneumonia. The Veterinarian said the pup caught the disease at the dog park. Who knows for sure; however, this is a highly contagious and easily contracted upper respiratory affliction. No one wants to think their pup caught this disease because they took them where they got infected.

The dog park is not the most likely place to catch this virus. The more likely place would be somewhere indoors — the vet office, the training facility, etc. When you are frequenting places where the dog population is larger, you need to vaccinate against this virus.

About the Vaccine 

We hold to the same recommendations as the Weimaraner Club of America. This vaccine should be given after the core vaccines are completed and not combined with any other shot–such as Rabies, or a puppy shot). Whenever possible, space it two weeks apart from all other vaccines. This vaccine like the puppy shot can be a trigger–open the door for immune system issues. This type of reaction is best avoided. By following these suggestions, you avoid over-taxing the immune system. It should also be noted, that this particular vaccine develops protection more quickly than the typical puppy shot which takes two weeks to develop full immunity.

It is also important to remember that the Kennel Cough protection doesn’t necessarily last a year. Even though you get the vaccine (which is either injected or given nasally), it doesn’t guarantee you are protected or provide continuous protection. Consider getting protection when the risk is at the highest. For example, if there is a local outbreak–this is one time when you are most at risk in your dog park. Also, consider it when you are thinking of boarding, attending classes, or joining in with a group of dogs for an event.

Final Thought

When we think of Kennel Cough, we general think of contracting it at an enclosed facility. There is less risk in the open environment—it seems infecting your Weimaraner would (almost always) require a direct encounter with the infected counterpart. The grass and surfaces might get contaminated; however, the virus would not last long.  In contrast, the Parvovirus can infect the ground for months. This upper respiratory viral infection is not as persistent or enduring–it is more of a direct contact type of thing.  Therefore, take caution when thinking about taking your young Weimaraner to places dogs frequent–vet offices, pet stores, indoor facilities, and pet areas. The more dogs, the more risk there is of contracting any number of infections.

Vet offices are vigilant about sanitation; however, you are always at risk of exposure. Someone walking into the reception area with a Parvo or the Kennel cough infected dog can easily infect the immediate area–and pass it to your pet. For this reason, some veterinary clinics offer the two-door access. These facilities have a wellness entrance and a separate entrance for pets who are ill. Isn’t that a great idea?

It should be noted

Neither Cliff nor Shela is a licensed Veterinary Technicians or Veterinarian. This is our thoughts on this topic based on experience.

Dodging a Potential Issue

Lisa and Sadie

 

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“What Do You Mean We Have To Move?”

Hello, my name is Lisa, and our weim is Sadie.  She just had her 7th birthday on 4/29.  We are going to relocate from our house to an apartment.

Sadie does have a lot of separation anxiety when she’s left home alone.  She is mostly never home alone for longer than an hour.  We take her with us in the car when it is possible. Sadie barks the full time she is left alone in the car. She sometimes quiets if she sees us go into the store. Anyhow, she doesn’t like to be away from us.
The weather is warming up here in Vancouver, WA. I cannot be taking her along and leaving her in the car. The warmer weather means that she must be left alone at home rather than taking her along. Now that we are moving it concerns me–I mean the heat means we need to leave her behind. I’m also concerned she will have a difficult time adjusting to her new surroundings or will she?
Can you tell me how to help Sadie become accustomed to the new apartment?

Thoughts from Cliff and Shela

Separation anxiety is something the Weimaraner is prone to develop. The best approach is preventative; however, even once your Weim has a healthy dose all is not lost. Here are a few thoughts that may help Sadie deal with or adjust to the changes.
1. First, don’t make a big deal out of the move yourself. Your frustration, anxiety, and concern will be internalized and externalized by Sadie. The Weimaraner tends to pick up on our cues.
2. Rely on the crate and go back to the basics. Freedom is earned until the adjustment is made. Safety first and apartment living also means closer neighbors.
3. Depending upon Sadies quirks, it might be a good idea to sleep on a pillowcase and then use it for a bedding cover in the crate. Don’t wash it–get your scent on it and then just use it. Your scent is a powerful thing to her–a comfort. Nevertheless, if she chews up her bedding and ingests it that can create a different kind of havoc.
4. If Sadie’s anxiety is severe, you might consider using Prozac. Medication can be a short-term solution to help her bridge the change. We like to avoid this situation; however, it is a judgment call as to whether this is something you need. If you are concerned, consider asking your Veterinary if this would be an option.
5. Old dogs can learn new tricks and one way you can help Sadie a lot is to help her learn to be more adaptable. That means mixing up her schedule and introducing new things. Don’t make a big deal out of this but even before you move, try relocating her crate and using it more. Do things in a different way instead of keeping things even keel.
6. Try to make a new Vancouver doggie friend and schedule a play date. Maybe you can work out a situation where you help someone else by taking the kids for an adventure and Sadie can learn to go with them. A home-away-from-home situation is always a welcome alternative.
7. Remain calm and believe in your heart everything is going to work out. Positive and upbeat thoughts will help you succeed.

Tell Us What Worked For You

We welcome ideas from our OwyheeStar clients. Can you help Sadie with this adjustment process? Please drop a comment here for Sadie and her mother. They live in the Vancouver, WA area if that helps anyone with a suggestion.