Category Archives: Companion Weimaraner

Colorado OwyheeStar

~Office Help

All is well.  All systems are working and we have had only one accident (my fault), otherwise, she’s going outside regularly. She does well at the office and actually asked to go out!

P.S. please put me down for a blue female with the tail.  Let me know when I need to send a deposit.

Breeder Comment

First, we want to thank Steve for being such a fantastic Weimlover. Now, some of you might wonder he what he means when he says, “with a tail.” Don’t all Weims have a tail? Yes, they do.

Steve means he wants an undocked tail on his next pup–which is what this one has by request. We have a particular protocol we follow for this type of request. For one thing, the deposit is sizeable–because if the person happens to walk away, then finding another home for the pup is an arduous task. It can be done, but it requires a lot of extra work. Therefore, we need more to get on the Wait List for the undocked tail, as well as to reserve such a puppy. Once the decision has been made, as about one-week, then docking the tail also becomes more involved.

Yesterday

~Somewhere in Utah

Then this Happened

Brandon Writes–Just wanted to drop a little note to let you know that the puppy is home and seems very happy.  I look forward to working with you guys in the very near future!


Breeder Comment

We are thrilled to hear that Toby is setting into his new family–doing well. We look forward to working with you again, thanks for the photos, Brandon.

Elle and her Preparation

~For the new puppy (Ace!)

Once Elle found out we were getting Ace this Friday (2/1/2019), she had to stop and get his name tag made!

For the past couple of years, we have been talking as a family about getting a 3rd Owyheestar puppy for our family (primarily for Elle our Daughter).  The thought of a 3rd dog is a little daunting, but early this last summer, Elle started to try and sell this hard to Jill and I.  Her final proposal went something like this… “So, I’m likely going to college in about 5 years, so if we are thinking of getting me my own dog, if we wait too long, I won’t have as much time with him.  Also, I will pay for as much of him as I can working small jobs and babysitting over this summer.”  


With that. we were sold and we told her the target amount we wanted her to provide (20%) and she agreed.  We sent our deposit with our puppy desires to our friends at Owyheestar and got onto the waiting list!

Note the matching Collar/Leash that Elle got from Mom and Dad for Ace.  Orange and Volleyball themed.  There are pictures and toys for Elle to look at while she waits for her new puppy!


On Dec 9th, 2018 we saw that Winnie had delivered and we saw that there were a couple pups that met our hopes and sure enough Sheila gave us the news that one of those would go to us.  The excitement for the arrival of “Ace” began.

Elle’s best friend at school is about as excited as Elle and has been giving her one of these sheets every day in anticipation of Ace’s arrival.


Every Sunday it was a family event to look at the updates (pictures) from Shela on the TV and ohhhhh and ahhhh on how cute Ace (and the rest of the pups) were.

Charlie Mae and Murphy are like “YOU ARE BRINGING WHAT HOME ON FRIDAY??!?!!!” Hehe.. they will love him eventually I have no doubt, but we fully expect some initial shunning of him (especially from Charlie Mae who doesn’t really seem to like puppies).  Murphy will be more open initially, but I expect him to be “done” with him quickly and wish he would go back where he came from….


Well –the 3rd Owyheestar furry baby is home —already Facebook famous!  

This photo was taken early Sunday morning. Jill is a good sport and has a great morning looking–her and the puppy. It seems all that preparation paid off–good job Elle. We look forward to receiving your forthcoming updates.

Expert Advice

~ We Do What we are able

Breeder Comment

Cliff and I get a lot of Email inquiries–most are from folks hoping we have a puppy that can make their dream come true. Others are from folks like Dale–seeking advice and making commentary on our blog. We cannot always offer the level of advice some need or expect. Recommendations are hard to give when we are not in the loop and time is limited; however, we do what we are able to do. In this situation, we shared the food we have used and some information about the Weimaraner and heart issues. We have not seen many cases –so relax. Nevertheless, there are plenty of things that can go wrong when it comes to health. We always recommend being as Holistic in your approach as possible. I have posted Dale’s note (with his permission)–maybe some of you can identify with Dale. We all can agree that the loss of our beloved Weimaraner is something inexplicable. There are no words to adequately describe our relationship and the hole they leave behind. It is best to focus on what they brought to our life–to count every day allotted a blessing.

From Dale

Hello Shela,  Your Owyheestar blog is the first email I open EVERY day.   And re-read.   And forward to friends and family.  I know it’s a lot of work keeping up with the blog, but know that you do a great job, and all these Weimaraner pix and stories warm a lot of hearts.    Although we adopted Duke, our Weim, at 1, we did not get him from you.  Though we will next time.  But this question is important to you and all your Weim lovers.   I stumbled upon your website a few months after we lost our beloved Weimaraner, Duke (below) at age 10.   He was a bullet running, swimming, hiking, playing until two weeks before he died of asymptomatic congestive heart failure and cardiomyopathy.   It’s been almost 8 months and I still can’t believe he’s gone.   Such a personality. I’d like to discuss your food recommendations.  I purchased what I researched as the best foods, mixing up flavors every month.   The brands were Origen, Acana and Zignature.  Mainly Acana.   They all had high protein levels (28%), and lots of fresh fruits and vegetables.   No grain.  He received 5 cups of food a day, mostly chicken, beef and fish, until shortly before he died.  One month after Duke died, research came out from Joshua Stern, UC Davis, that certain foods that were high in legumes, were linked to heart disease in several breeds that lack a genetic history of the ailment.  (Canine diluted cardiomyopathy CDM)  Apparently these expensive boutique foods had a taurine deficiency.  Meats have plenty of taurine, but legumes do not.   So the red flag is legumes listed in the first six ingredients of the food.   Also, chicken and beef are high in taurine, while many exotic meats such as lamb, rabbit and others, and legumes have little or none.  Research is ongoing, and I know that CDM happens in these big-hearted dogs like Weims, pointers, etc.  I don’t know if the food caused or contributed to Duke’s premature death, but given his excellent health, it is a possibility.   But have you heard anything?   And what foods do you recommend? Also, we’re wondering about getting another Weim at our age.   I’m 66, my husband is 68, and we’re not sure we can keep up and do justice to another Weim.   Any thoughts on this?  Thank you for all you do, Dale

Faces

Speak Volumes

Here I am wrinkled up face looking like I have an attitude.

I think we all read too much into a puppy’s face. Often people write they can tell a pup’s personality. For me–having seen so many over the decades, I tend to believe faces speak volumes–but mostly humans react to what they see. (Haha) Honestly, some of the best temperament ones might have smushed up face that looked like they have their mad-on. Can I suggest that they have not quite grown into their face?

This speaks of happiness, doesn’t it?

This makes us laugh!

At Two Days
At One Day

The mouse-sized newborn Weimaraner puppy leaves us breathless–always. We never tire of seeing them come into the world–wondering what will become. We hope that everyone has the best possible life.

Athena

~She is adjusting well

Here is a story I thought you would appreciate. Saturday me and My girlfriend Samantha took our puppy to Lowe’s to get some supplies and ran into a gentleman (the name I forgot) who have a beautiful almost 2-year-old blue male Weimaraner named Kota (Dakota) I’m assuming? 


He explained he got his dog from you as well and that he got one of the blue males from the same litter as our little girl! Small world! Meanwhile, Athena is having a lot of good experiences beyond the crate training I mentioned last time we spoke.

Also, this link (click here) might be of interest as I am sure she was the main reason we made the news! 2 segments at that! 

Breeder Comment

Hey Nick–we appreciate the cute photos. We are glad that you were able to connect again with Koda’s & Mylo’s family–I am sure you have a playdate in the works. Maybe you didn’t realize it, but yesterday’s blog featured the two Blue boys belonging to the gentleman you met at Lowes.

We hope you will stay in touch–and that your training continues to unfold in an excellent manner. Thanks ever so much for this lovely update.

Seven Steps to Success

OwyheeStar Recommends

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Note: This is a repost of an article we have shared several times. Our pups are ready to acclimate to their new environment upon arrival. We recommend not over-thinking at the early stages.

  1. Be committed — Commitment to the process is primary. Training your pup will take time. Think of this as a journey (a road trip) with a destination in mind. Don’t set timelines; instead, take this adventure together. It will take as long as it takes for each achievement. Sometimes just when you think, you have arrived; your Weimaraner will hit a snag or transitional phase. There are many of these stages in the first couple of years. As with an adolescent, they can be going along well and suddenly regress. Please take this in stride it is nothing personal. The first occurrence could well be prior to week twelve. Stay calm and move ahead–this is how to avoid ingraining fear or some unwanted behavior.
  2. Keep your eye on the young puppy at all times—This is vitally important for at least the first 2-3 weeks, or until you have the housebreaking part accomplished. Use a crate, bag, or soft-side crate to confine the pup when you cannot be vigilant. The crate should not be too large. If it is more than they need they may select one end for a potty area.
  3. Be consistent–Do everything in the same manner! For example, the pup wakes up and stirs. At first, you would pick them up and carry them out to the area where you want them to go potty. Each time you see them circling or rousing from a nap go to the potty-area. If you use the bells hung at the door, then ring them as you go out the door. Soon they will be ringing the bells as a signal for you to open the door.
  4. Keep it simple — Although your pup can learn amazing things, it is best to do a few simple things and build upon those experiences. The process will unfold naturally if you allow it to do so; start with getting them to come. Although they all follow and come to us, it is different once they start to mature. Do the hallway exercise (5-7 retrieves each night). By using a hallway (with adjoining doors closed) there is nowhere for them to escape with the toy, ball, or dummy. Some people treat them when they bring the item to their hand. It is not necessary. The activity is a reward in and of itself. Have a couple of bumpers or toys (designated for this activity). Make it an event every day until you move to the yard because you have compliance.
  5. Keep it fun — Weimaraners are brilliant and learn quickly. A trainer might tell you to work for an hour and even a half hour doing one exercise every night, but we suggest ten minutes. Do it for ten minutes and then do something fun. This approach works for us! If your Weim pup loses interest, you lose ground in the training process.
  6. Remember it is about your relationship — No matter what you are doing it is important to remember that Weims are all about relationship. If they get their feelings hurt, things can go sour quickly. Your bonding experience is vital to the success of this relationship. Take time to think and see things from their perspective. You are the center of their world. They not only want to control you, but they want to own you. Weimaraners are the ultimate Velcro dog and must learn how to stay alone. Your relationship is a double-edged sword. They need a lot of time, attention, and affection. They also need to find ways to cope when you are absent. We recommend starting this process very early, or they will come to expect you will be there 24 X 7. Separation anxiety can be a huge issue in this breed.
  7. Be patient — When you go out to teach your pup a skill, make sure it is a learn-able task. Plan enough time to accomplish the task–but keep your training focused to ten to twenty minutes maximum. The short bursts of success are more effective than lengthy sessions. Your attitude and demeanor play into the equation too! If you are feeling stressed, forego training your Weimaraner. There are many methods of training. Nevertheless, choose one that enhances your bonding experience and one that creates a respectful environment for all concerned.

The best Weimaraner people are those that are natural leaders. Anytime you feel your relationship is stressed then you are going down the wrong road. The persons that are neither too strict nor too lenient are usually, the ones that excel. Regardless of what happens, it is always best to pro-active than to be reactive. Stay calm. Keep it simple. Get results. Plan little steps of learning and build upon them. Try our 7 steps to Success, and we believe you will be on the right path.

Wishing you fewer puppy bites and more puppy kisses

One Last Love before he leaves…..

~ Shela and Cliff

Moxie and Mama

Bird Hunting

~Emphasis on Hunting it Seems

Moxie and I wanted to check in and let you know we had a great day in the fields on the last day of Pheasant season here in California.  It would’ve been better had we gotten a bird but we only saw a small hen and 1 rooster that day who proved to be faster than my mom’s quick draw and shot.  

Smart, wild birds are my favorite!  But that’s ok, we had a good day of awesome nose work and exercise.  Next year we will get them!
Happy New Year to all the OwyheeStar Weims out there, especially the ones living life on the farm in Treasure Valley! ~ Chrissy

Breeder Comment

The bird got away is a common theme. (Haha) Regardless, Moxie would have retrieved it were it possible. What a great experience to be out hunting together. Thank you, Chrissy–for always remembering us with your newsy updates. They are fabulous!

Second Christmas

~ Dasher

This was our second Christmas with our Dash. As you can see, he’s grown up quite a bit from last year at this time. He continues to be a happy, healthy and handsome boy. He just has the best disposition and we love him so. We just wanted to let you know that we are so grateful that we got him from you. All the best to our OwyheeStar family. Audrey & Dave

Breeder Comment

Thank you for sharing this lovely photo of Dash. We are thrilled that he more than met your expectations.


Looking For Birds

Our Koda

     ~Out and About Together

This looks interesting

It’s been a while since we checked in so I thought I’d send you a few pictures of Koda.  We went out mainly for exercise but also to see if he could stir up any birds. 

We covered a lot of distance but unfortunately, the only thing flying was a few geese that came into a pond we were circling.  Koda sure had a great time sniffing around and I think he’d do well but I guess we’ll have to wait and see.

Breeder Comment

Thank you, we appreciate the update. Koda looks the part–and genetically he would have excellent potential. Both Stackhouse, as well as Sadie, are proven hunters. Of course, it takes a knack to hone the field skills–once they get the idea, it should be fun for the hunter and the companion Weimar, too!