Category Archives: Hunt Info

Puppy Development

~ The Adult-Looking Nine-Month Old Weimaraner

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36 weeks (from AKC)

At 9 months, you’re probably starting to wonder when your puppy will be fully grown. Expect your adolescent puppy to continue to grow and develop emotionally for a little while longer, and keep up on your puppy’s training. Take a moment during training to reflect on what you might be doing to encourage some of your puppy’s bad habits and make a commitment to change your behavior.

Miles kissing

These comments are meant for puppies in general; however, they apply even more so for the Weimaraner puppy. Letting your 12-week old pup jump up is not a good idea. If you do, by the time they are 9-months-old, you have a bigger problem. Letting them bite your fingers–as a young pup, may well lead to mouthing issues as the Weimaraner matures. Some do this mouthing-thing for their entire life–and for their owner, it might not seem like a problem until they put their mouth on someone else–those teeth can easily tear a hole in a thin-skinned older adult, or alarm someone.

Saluting Christina

~For All She Does

Nail Trim

Every OwyheeStar puppy is hand-raised, and this process requires a good eye as well as focus. Then there is follow-through–steps we take at every transition point from birth for the exit. We are fortunate to have our granddaughter (who we trained) as a puppy-whisperer. You cannot teach someone to do this–it takes instinct and the ability–and the eye to see the little things before they spiral into something bigger. Pups get scratched, develop little issues, need nails trimmed, ears cleaned, etc. –it is a lot because a young pup is susceptible to all kind of bacterial, viral, and yeast infections.

You might remember Dink–he was a miracle pup. Christina decided she would keep him with her 24 X 7 because he needed around the clock care. She did this knowing she might not be able to save him–but if she could, it would be so rewarding. Over the years, we have saved many ultra-small pups that needed extra care. They could not survive because the bigger, stronger littermates would push them off the best teats. There might not be enough teats for everyone to drink at once–and the bigger keep growing while the small ones get shoved away. This scenario doesn’t mean that a smaller pup has anything wrong, but without intervention, their chance of survival is slim.

You Probably Know the Story

Dr. Calhoun at the Idaho Veterinary Hospital gave his as through of a check that is possible at the six-week visit.

It takes all of us to produce a well-balanced ready to adapt puppy. People ask, “do you have them house-trained.” I always say, “no, but we have them ready.” I think that is the better approach–they have to learn your routine, the household layout, and adjust. If you stay after it, the housebreaking can happen very quickly.

Behaviors

~Habits Good and Bad Take Hold Quickly

Innocence –but there is one in the Group (Haha)

Habits form quickly–once a behavior (good or bad) starts it can soon become habitual. For example, the Weim can become an incessant barking machine. I swear they can bark at a cloud. Maybe it looks like a bird. Incessant by definition means unceasing or Continuing without interruption. Maybe that is an overstatement, but if you have that behavior ingrained, it will not seem an exaggeration.

Barking, digging, territorial behaviors, chewing on everything, and the list goes on–if you allow it in a small dose, it can become a thing. Us humans, often get duped and our efforts undermined.

To prevent that and other unwanted behaviors a person must be vigilant early on. It is not one and done thing either.  The childlike tendencies often last past their third birthday with the occasional teenage behavior surfacing from time to time. I laugh at people who want this breed and expect them to be easy to manage. A lot can and should be accomplished in the first three months; however, you are not home free so to speak. At the same time—getting the basics done right up front will save you a lot of trouble. 

Also consider that the Weimaraner who wants to rule their world can employ growling and snarling. They can withdraw and sulk. They have all kind of ways to get what they want–some are acceptable, others are not. One thing for sure–do not reward or excuse bad behavior.

From the Archives

Water and Your Weimaraner

     ~Puppy Swim

Most of you know that we try to swim puppies–time and weather permitting. Above is a GoPro Video of a litter swim taken a couple of years ago. It gives you a different perspective. Some pups are excellent swimmers; others struggle a little. Nonetheless, we have never had a puppy fail to be able to swim. Does this mean they will naturally take to the water? No! If you expect them to jump and take off, you may be disappointed. It will most likely require work to get them into the water and swimming. This effort is work we hope you invest. We deem this an essential part of the puppy raising process.DSC03640

The Why and the How

Over the years we have written extensively on how to achieve the swim. More and more of our clients have managed to do this. Sometimes to their own surprise. It is one of the best things you can do for yourself and the Weimaraner.

To expend energy. The growing Weimaraner has boundless energy; however, they cannot be beating the pavement to run off this energy. Until the growth plates close, you need to limit high impact exercise. Many experts agree that about three miles is the limit. Imagine how quickly the Weimaraner puts in the three miles. Seriously, about a mile into your run they have probably gone this far. Using the swim is the ideal way to exercise without causing damage to the growing joints. We would go so far as to suggest it probably helps your Weimaraner get more years and miles from their body. That is something that serves everyone’s best interest. We think you can agree.

Hunter or not you need to master the recall. You say what do you mean by the recall? That is coming when called. Getting the retrieve to hand is also a part of the recall. The rock solid come when you call or give a command–verbal or otherwise. The bringing of a bumper or toy back to you. Keep away it funny and laughable; however, we don’t feel this is ever in the best interest of the Weimaraner or you.

Cliff and I suggest you find an area where there is no escape route. For example–a hallway (closing all the adjoining doors) will work for this exercise. You want to make this an exciting event. Something that they look forward to doing with you. Sit down in that hallway and work on the retrieve at least every day. You want to ingrain the love of the retrieve as well as getting them to bring the dedicated item it to hand. This discipline will serve you well and help you achieve the swim.

The hallway exercise should begin as soon as they arrive. Make it an event–the same person, the same bumper or toy, and somewhat a routine. Five-Seven throws blocking the exit with your body. Toss and retoss keeping the excitement going. This activity should be fun, short-lived, and you want to stop while they are still excited. Once you have the rock solid recall—then you can move to the yard. You may need to use a check cord in the larger venue. If you don’t know what that is, ask us. It is a long line that attaches to their collar and allows you to reel them back to you. Always giving them praise like it was all their idea.

Why the Retrieve

The Weimaraner that is in loves the retrieve then can be worked along the water–at first shallow water. A pond or something similar is ideal. Slopping sides even better. That way they can play at the water’s edge and retrieve. Eventually, you can edge them out a bit, and they will take off and swim a couple of strokes. This process takes patience. You might wonder how long. Can we say it takes as long as it takes? Typically, Cliff gets the water-retrieve in two weeks or less. The rewards are almost endless. You can do this! Believe in the process. Stay optimistic. Keep it fun. Stay at it until you achieve success.

Running Companions

For the long distance runner, this is the best way to set the Weimaraner up as your running companion. The growth plates typically close around 15 months. By then you should have them swimming. The waterwork can keep your running companion in the tip-top shape you need as well as help them develop muscles which may help prevent injury.

To Burn Off Energy

For those less inclined or find themselves challenged to keep up with the Weimaraner, this is an excellent way to burn off the excess energy. The Weimaraner will still be able to join you on walks, etc. But tiring the Weimaraner out is challenging. The waterwork helps and does it without injury. Of course, there are other pros to having the water-friendly Weimaraner.

Imprinting the Idea

We swim the pups with the idea that it imprints this experience. If you wonder, the Weimaraner has webbed toes. There are hundreds of updates on our blog that feature OwyheeStar pups and adults enjoying the water–swimming, retrieving, and playing in it. We hope you will achieve the swim.

Here is Stackhouse — a strong swimmer

Cliff Elaborates on–

The Basics …

Nothing is more important than loose leash heeling. It is imperative it be achieved.  I am not talking about using a head halter, gentle leader, front-hooking harness, or a prong collar in order to accomplish the goal.

A regular (or flat) collar

This is what I hope every OwyheeStar Weimlover will accomplish……..

  1. Loose Leash Heeling (on a regular flat collar)
  2. Sit-stay
  3. Down-Stay
  4. Come; followed by the Sit-stay

We (Shela and I) would like you to focus on achieving these four goals with your OwyheeStar Weimaraner. I am positive when  accomplished in the right manner, the outcome will be good. There are various ideas on the appropriate timeline to have mastered these disciplines. I would like to see you have them done by the time the pup reaches 7 months–before the hormones kick in. Puppy classes can get you off to a good start, but the quality of sit-stay, etc. is not finished at 4 months. As the Weimaraner develops, there will be challenges.

Respect and the Relationship

Depth in your relationship is worth achieving; respect is a crucial part of your relationship-development. When you get the loose-lead respect, then you can easily achieve these other goals. It is a bit like a thread that pulls you through a good novel (or movie); without a strong relationship (or the underlying story-line), it is hard to get to end. Distractions come along.

Jan Magnuson –The priorities in my basic obedience/good manners classes are loose leash heeling, sit-stay, down-stay, come and sit-stay, and no bite.  I agree, if folks can get these down pat, everything else tends to fall into place.  Loose leash walking is imperative, as it is representative of the relationship between dog and handler (if the leash is relaxed, so is your relationship, if the leash is tense and strained, so is your relationship).  Dogs that “do better off leash” feel they are in charge and do what pleases them, and if they mind it is because they happen to feel like it at the moment- that is not a trained dog.  I like down-stays a lot because it is a subservient posture, the dog should learn to be totally relaxed so we do lots of these- we allow them to lie on one hip or their side and get their head and tummy rubbed, with lots of calm praise.

Get it done; Keep it Fun…

Never forget to have fun. If this becomes a grind, neither you nor the Weimaraner will enjoy it. If it becomes boring, there are always other things you want to do. Once these four things are mastered, you need to keep them sharp. It is not something you achieve and forget about; these are lifelong skills you take with you on the entire journey.

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Note: We will discuss collars (and choices) in a later blog. There are many suitable styles of  the regular (flat-collar) type. Collar purchases are more a fashion-statement than we like to admit. Hunters are field-fashion conscious. Some prefer a fine leather collar, while others prefer a durable plastic-based collar that resists dirt, odor, and fading. These collars wipe clean. They come in a variety of colors; fluorescent orange, fluorescent green, and fluorescent yellow are popular. Some hunters find the cammo collar a must-have accessory. One of our favorite vet techs saw a purple collar we had on a girl, and asked where we found it. There are other great colors too.

Strutting Your Stuff

~ Meet Kip (Dutch’s Shadow)

Yes, Kip’s pointing. Both Sam and Bonney have gotten him on point with the wing.

Breeder Comment

And so, it begins. What more is there to say?

Hope’s First Swim



Hope is 13 months old, and yesterday was the first time she had been to the pond since she was a pup. I don’t remember exactly, but I am reasonably sure she did the puppy swim about a year ago.

Regardless, she has not been acclimated to the water until now. Cliff took her out to the pond on Monday evening. She got into the water chest high but didn’t swim. Tuesday, a whole different thing happened. Remember when we say to ingrain the love of the retrieve. Here is why–

Bob and Whisky

~Preparing for Competition

Whisky has been in training now for 6 months and is becoming a great bird dog. He loves it. The trainer feels he would do great in Hunt Test competition, so we will start training for that.


At the age of 6 months, Whisky started retriever and obedience training at Coyote Creek Oregon Gun Dog Training in Eugene. He started at the age of 6 months and has been doing very well. We visit him at least twice a week to work with him and train ourselves. The trainer is very impressed with his abilities and drive and is confident that Whisky will excel in the field and in competition. 

Breeder Comment

We are glad you are doing well with Whiskey and that your trainer feels he has good hunt trial potential. We look forward to hearing about the experience.

Behind the Scenes

Christina and Babe

Before the pups arrive, the Mamas have our full attention–we work to ensure they eat well. We watch for any sign of a problem, etc. The whelp-window is typically from day 59 to day 64. The pups must be at least 59 days old to survive–although we might use extraordinary measures to save a puppy–there are limitations.

Once the pups are here, Christina and I do most of the hands-on work. We do like to involve Cliff when possible–a man’s touch is a good thing. Some pups require a lot more than others–case in point, Dink. You might remember the tiny undersized puppy which Christina took to feeding and caring for around the clock. Sometimes intervention doesn’t work–because there is something wrong. Other times such a pup starts to thrive and eventually catches up with their litter.

Day One Photo

From Day-One, there is a lot of hands-on work. Thankfully, Christina is a skilled puppy handler-whisperer sort of helper. Recently, she whelped a pup when we had to be away from the house. She has an eye for details–watching and looking the puppies over constantly while she adjusts their collars, handles them, and works with each one. As you might imagine, this kind of process is labor-intensive–but we believe it works–is essential.

There are many stages and steps involved in the raising of the Weimaraner. We hope to have them set up for success–but once they transition to their ‘forever family,’ the work continues. No matter our efforts, it is almost as if you are starting from scratch–it is a new environment. They have to adjust and adapt, which they will do very quickly, and at the same time, the humans must take control of the leadership role, or the puppy will rule the house in short order.

Kenai

~Spunk and Snuggles

We just love Kenai more and more each day.  He’s a little adventurer,  and a great combination of spunk and snuggle. Casey has been working on his beginning hunting training – introducing him to birds and gunshots.  He’s been doing fantastic!

His vet cleared him to start exploring more,  and to go camping! So last week we headed up to Olympic National Park,  and then down the coast, stopping in Astoria for a night before heading home.  He wasn’t able to go everywhere in the national park,  of course,  but there were a few dog-friendly areas to explore,  and meet new people.  He loved it! Here’s a few shots taken on our trip.


Kaylen and Casey

Breeder Comment

Cliff and I are so delighted to receive your report. What a fun adventure. Thanks for the hard work–keep it up. You are off to a fabulous beginning.