Category Archives: Ingested items

Every Breath You Take

~ Sounds Like

I often wonder how we do it. You know–raise a puppy. We bring the little bundle home and hover over them. It is essential to do the hovering thing–otherwise, how can you accomplish the housebreaking, etc.? But this obsession with our new fur baby runs deep–some of this never goes away.

Their every sound–a rattling, a snore, a hacking sound is cause for alarm. We watch breath-abated wondering if we need to run to the Vet. Ah–it is hard to know sometimes. We always suggest you wait and watch a bit–possibly take their temperature. Remember that a pet’s temperature is much higher than ours–typically around 101 degrees. Anything above 104 degrees is emergent. Of course, if you were monitoring their temperature and it was 102 degrees and then within an hour 103 degrees, there might be cause for alarm. Always err on the side of caution–but rushing to the Vet for everything is probably not necessary. In fact, your alarm will be internalized by the puppy increasing the stress-factor. Try to stay calm.

A lot–and I do mean a lot, of our concerns, are for nothing. Puppies can cough, they snort, the sneeze, they can reverse sneeze (something we recently learned), they choke, and create a myriad of noises. Many of which are concerning. Most of which are in the end nothing at all. Thank goodness.

Keep your eye on them. A pup can ingest something in quick order–so despite saying not to overreact, there is vigilance. Recently, Henri went under my recliner and came out with a packet –that must have been attached underneath the chair. We didn’t realize it was there, but Henri found two–probably toxic packets. Oh my gosh–it is good we heard the crackling sound and asked what she had. We retrieved each package and tossed them in the trash. Thankfully they were not broken open.

A Penchant for Paper!

      ~Naughty Maizie, Or Not!

No Paper on My Lips or Anywhere

You wouldn’t believe that this little beauty, MAIZIE, age 6.5, has a penchant for paper!  

You can file this in a chapter of “Weim Crimes!”  Yesterday, we left the house for an hour.  Maizie stayed home.  Usually always on our return home, she happily greets us—smiling, chattering, nibbling, wiggling with glee.  Yesterday she did not greet us.  Uh oh.   (She doesn’t greet us if she’s been naughty).   I found her laying in her living room sofa bed—ears back and shivering!  Uh oh.  Major telltale guilt!  We did a search of the house to find the “evidence” and came up with nothing!  We assumed then that she was just “thinking” about doing something naughty—reason for her guilty behavior.  That was, UNTIL…..
…..I went to make dinner!  Before we left home, I had printed a new recipe, Martha Stewart’s “Bacon-Mushroom-Leek Galette.”  It printed out on 3 pages.  I had left it on the dining room table.  It was nowhere to be found!  
BUSTED!  She didn’t leave a trace!  I had to reprint it to make dinner!  This is why we close our office door when we leave the house, can’t leave mail on the table, or leave a package in sight!  This girl’s got a penchant for paper!
Linda ❤️🐾

Breeder Comment

We cannot believe how smart this girl is, and as I replied–this is not her first paper raid you told us about. Old habits die hard. I guess the good news is it is paper—just so she doesn’t take to eating cash or important documents. (OMG)

Pie Anyone?

Maybe you noticed Nancy’s post regarding Luna and Tikka’s clever pie snatching –or maybe I should say sampling trick. It is too good to not borrow, so I asked Nancy for her permission. (Haha) It seemed like a good Sunday post.

Nancy writes, “When I got back in my truck and checked the pie (that I had hidden under the blanket) “Oh good, the lid’s still on!” “Good girls!” … Upon closer examination, I realize that they weren’t good girls, just clever girls for somehow getting the lid back in place!”

What To Do?

Upsampled Pie Squares, of course!

“Here’s what you do with pumpkin pie that the Weims have sampled.”

😊

Breeder Comment

Well, Nancy, this is perfect example of so many things Weimar related.

  1. How the Weimaraner can find a way, to get their way.
  2. How on the surface things look okay until you find it is not.
  3. How the experienced Weim-person figures a way to make something positive out of what is left. (Haha)

I seriously expect that Tikka and Luna had the  pie leftovers. So things worked out for them. I think it is amazing they didn’t eat the whole pie. 

Tikka says it was mostly Luna–look she has the horn to prove it.

Turkey Talk

Thanksgiving

          ~What We Don’t Want

Where's the Turkey

The emergency Vet Vist probably tops our list. It is the quickest way to spoil our celebration. Nonetheless, is there a time when our attention is more divided? The snatch and grab Weimaraner could abscond with some spectacular finds. They are everywhere–the counter, the dining table, the plates, and possibly on the floor. One thing you might overlook–the rising bread dough or rolls. Bread Dough Toxicosis can prove life-threatening. Maybe a toddler is waving a turkey leg. Is that an invite? The opportunist Weimaraner will make the most of this food-driven holiday gathering.

The humans at your table–they are a significant threat to the Weimaraner. Who doesn’t want to sneak the pup a treat? But too many sneaks and the gut can become overloaded even with acceptable food. The sensitive Weim might have a bout of pancreatitis from too much fatty food. Then there are the cooked poultry bones–be sure if you throw them out it is where the Weimaraner cannot steal them.

You Might Consider

IMG_5035What if you made a plate for the Weimaraner that everyone could help share? This plating idea might work. Here are some excellent choices.

  • Turkey — no bones
  • Green beans (plain)
  • Squash or Pumpkin (plain)
  • Apple slices (without the seeds)

Avoid These

      ~ to mention a few

  • Mashed Potatoes
  • Stuffing
  • Gravy
  • Corn on the Cob
  • Nuts (pecans and Macadamia)
  • Grapes and Raisins

You can bake a Weim cookie or a Weim pie that forgoes the seasonings. Eggs and pumpkin and a tiny bit of milk will bake up nicely. You could make the crust using treats. Possibly make them in a silicone cupcake pan or cupcake papers. We are not saying it cannot be a lot of fun for the Weimar too. However, no one wants the unthinkable to spoil all the fun.

Remember, it is all good and fun until the unthinkable happens!

Here’s to an excellent Thanksgiving Day Celebration for all our Weim-loving Friends!!

What About

Worms

      ~and Other Parasites

3-Juniper X Boone 2018 Wk3-17This topic (of worms) is not one we like to discuss unless we are talking about putting the fishing worm on the hook–even then, to many it is a nauseating thought. Nonetheless, worms and parasites are opportunistic. They find ways to survive inside your pet as well as in extreme environmental conditions. Dog’s Naturally has posted some natural solutions that you might find helpful. Here is their article —click here to find out more.

Signs of Worms

Some worms cause more obvious symptoms than others. I’ve provided more specific symptom information below along with information about the different types of worms (See Types of Worms below) … but here are a few clues your dog may give you that could mean he has worms:

  • Intermittent or frequent diarrhea or vomiting can be signs your dog has worms.
  • Your dog may have a fever.
  • He may scoot and lick his rear (though scooting can mean other things too).
  • Your dog may be off his food or be a little lethargic; his coat may look dull.
  • You might see stools that are coated in mucus (but otherwise look normal).
  • Or you might see squiggly worms or “rice bodies” in his stool.

But some worms can’t be seen with the naked eye, so if your dog’s showing some of these signs, you might want to get a fecal sample analyzed by your vet.

Cliff and I suggest you keep your eye on the pooh–I know it doesn’t sound lovely, but getting a fecal check can help you avoid some of the more unpleasant scenarios. A loose stool doesn’t always mean there is something amiss, but when something like that happens, you want to keep watch. Of course, we love adding the pumpkin (or even banana squash). We are planting Banana Squash in our garden. Right now I only have two hills ready to plant. I would like more, but we have to see if we can make more room. Last year, I baked the banana squash and frozen it in chunks for easy serving. The Weims love it!

Pushkin

Roadtrip

     ~Coping with Excess Energy 

20180414_154025
Pushkin and I are preparing for a long road trip to Arizona to move my mother into an assisted living facility. Once that has been taken care of we are going on to the Chaco Canyons of New Mexico.  It is the oldest Anasazi site in the U.S. In preparation for the trip to Arizona, we took a trip from Salem to Kennewick to see my grandchildren.

What I learned on the drive was that we had to stop quite often, not because Push had to “potty” but because he needed exercise. Once he was out of the car and we walked for a bit he settled right down when we started up again. At every rest stop, someone would comment on what a beautiful dog he is. I have attached some pictures for you. The man is my son, the children are obviously my grandchildren. I am not sure who that white-haired old woman is, could it be me?😏

What a great dog he is!
Marie

Breeder Comment

Thanks for the great share–we are excited you’re traveling together. That is fun. We loved your pointer on burning off the excess energy. It is good for humans as well.
One suggestion we might have is to be careful about dusty areas you visit while in the Southwest. Valley Fever in dogs is a thing. We would not want anything to happen to the lovely Puskin. Click here to read a bit about this potential risk. 

Pushkin

Overall we are doing WellClement's Pushkin3238

I set up the crate – left the door open and Pushkin went right in – kennel arrives on Tuesday. So far only one accident in the house.

Oh, and outdoors we have a little challenge. It is pouring rain here, and the ground is saturated and muddy. Yes, we have grass, but it is that wet. Do you have a recommendation as to something that can be put down as a ground cover?

Wishing you well.
Marie

Breeder Comment

 

Kudos to you for keeping accidents to a minimum. Getting the housebreaking done right early on is vital. You know that! So, that is fabulous.

It doesn’t matter when you get your puppy; there is always some challenge. Wow! That is a lot of rain, but then we are talking Oregon–and not our side of the state either. I suggest you try some sand. It should be OK except for tracking it into the house. Nevertheless, it will help with that mud situation. I wish we could buy two truckloads here, but the rain and mud will soon be history. Afterall, it is far Eastern Oregon–the high desert that is typically arid.

Sand should not be a problem. Removal should be relatively easy once you no longer need it. Scoop up the excess and put it wherever. Wash the remainder into the ground. The cool, wet weather is also ideal for one-celled organisms such as Giardia and Coccidia. Birds and other critters can bring this into your yard, and it can thrive in a wet environment. Therefore, getting a fecal check at the 9-week puppy visit and possibly again at the 12-week visit would be a wise investment. A garden sprayer loaded with 10% bleach solution used in between visits –or even once a day might help eradicate this issue. (No, the bleach will not hurt your lawn.) Sure picking up after the Weimaraner will make a difference; however, there are plenty of ways they can ingest a cyst. Everything goes in the mouth–including their paws.

When a pup leaves OwyheeStar they are parasite free; however, this can change in a blink of an eye. These opportunistic one-celled parasites are in our environment. We talk a lot about avoiding Paravirus infected locations, but most of those high-traffic areas are infected with the one-celled organisms too. The reality seems to be that some Weimaraners are more prone to picking up this type of infection. It is a nasty affair, and it can set back the housebreaking progress. Here’s to hoping everyone escapes this mishap.

The Wire Crate

Marie has purchased the Life Stages Wire Kennel or Crate for Indoor Use. This crate features a divider that allows you to adjust the size. We just wanted to point out the divider and how it works. Excellent job Marie.

Gobble Gobble

For Thanksgiving

          ~What We Don’t Want

Where's the Turkey

OK–I see you, now where is the good stuff?

The emergency Vet Vist probably tops our list. It is the quickest way to spoil our celebration. Nonetheless, is there a time when our attention is more divided? The snatch and grab Weimaraner could abscond with some spectacular finds. They are everywhere–the counter, the dining table, the plates, and possibly on the floor. One thing you might overlook–the rising bread dough or rolls. Bread Dough Toxicosis can prove life-threatening. Maybe a toddler is waving a turkey leg. Is that an invite? The opportunist Weimaraner will make the most of this food-driven holiday gathering.

The humans at your table–they are a significant threat to the Weimaraner. Who doesn’t want to sneak the pup a treat? But too many sneaks and the gut can become overloaded even with acceptable food. The sensitive Weim might have a bout of pancreatitis from too much fatty food. Then there are the cooked poultry bones–be sure if you throw them out it is where the Weimaraner cannot steal them.

You Might Consider

What if you made a plate for the Weimaraner that everyone could help share? This plating idea might work. Here are some excellent choices.

  • Turkey — no bones
  • Green beans (plain)
  • Squash or Pumpkin (plain)
  • Apple slices (without the seeds)

Avoid These

      ~ to mention a few

  • Mashed Potatoes
  • Stuffing
  • Gravy
  • Corn on the Cob
  • Nuts (pecans and Macadamia)
  • Grapes and Raisins

You can bake a Weim cookie or a Weim pie that forgoes the seasonings. Eggs and pumpkin and a tiny bit of milk will bake up nicely. You could make the crust using treats. Possibly make them in a silicone cupcake pan or cupcake papers. We are not saying it cannot be a lot of fun for the Weimar too. However, no one wants the unthinkable to spoil all the fun.

Lapdog

What Does Your Weim Do?

 

Ari the Lap Dog_4490018248684979043_n

Ari is a Lap Weim and  very clever at trying to run the show

 

 

We who love the breed know they are the ultimate velcro dog. This attribute can work against us; however, most Weimlovers are addicted to this trait. New to the Weimaraner–you might be shocked at a large breed being this clingy. They are also prone to separation anxiety.

How This Works

When present you are their security blanket. When their humans are absent, the unprepared Weimaraner may freak out. All too many have ended up in rescue or a shelter because unaware admirers acquired them only to discover they couldn’t live with them. Not understanding the separation anxiety lead to unearned freedom and coming home to destruction. It might be your favorite shoes. The sofa arm by the front window or the carpet might be the target of the Weim’s reaction to feeling abandoned. The arm-missing-castoff-sofas greet the unsuspecting returning owner. Most often the human counterpart is perplexed. They might have had a Weim before that didn’t behave like this; however, in this instance, something went awry. Your absence causes them to act out–typically chewing up something to relieve their stress. They fear you will not return to them. You forgot them. The amount of destruction can vary. Sometimes the Weimaraner can escape the environment and give chase looking for you–desperate to find you. The last scenario has ended in a loss more times than you can imagine.

Twists and Turns

 

Griffin's Zeus and Ari Mess

Ari and Zeus made this mess for fun

Separation anxiety can take other forms. Some Weims sulk and then chew because they are upset with you. Nevertheless, they might withhold their love and refuse to even look at you. When your response is heartbrokenness and trying to win back their affection, they have the upper paw. Now, they can expand their toolbox with extreme manipulation. So, they can chew to relieve stress. They can chew because it has become a habit. They can chew to punish you. For those who are less committed, you can see how this can spin out of control.

 

Spiraling Out of Control

When coupled with incessant barking (and your neighbors are reporting you to the police) the destructive Weimaraner soon becomes abhorrent. People imagine that they would never dump their Weim at a shelter. Unfortunately, it happens too often. Therefore, our application process looks to discover the potential for failure with the breed as well as to gather the vital information necessary. Someone who is offended by us wanting the information may look elsewhere for their Weimaraner. It has to be that way. There are too many ways things can go awry–even for the most dog savvy person.

 

 

Dash

Happy Together

IMG_3634

Dash had his 12-Week Vet Visit and the Parvo Shot today. He is 24 pounds and has the best disposition. He is just a gorgeous boy!

Breeder Comment

Dave, we are happy to learn you and Dasher are off to a great start. It is also a blessing to know that you are delighted with your new family addition. We know how important that is and never more so when someone has had a less than ideal experience before coming to OwyheeStar.

The importance of looks–while often a top consideration, pales in comparison to temperament and health. A beautiful unhealthy Weimaraner is heartbreaking. We realize that living creatures have issues–some more than others. Regardless, getting off to a fantastic start with a thriving pup is something we wish for every OwyheeStar client. Of course, we give tips that can help maintain these goals–follow the OwyheeStar Weimaraner Vaccine protocol, keep guard against parasites (they are everywhere), and get the basics done. Each of these things is foundational. There may be hiccups and rabbit trails along the journey, but nothing is more imperative than getting off to a good start.

Parasites are something not discussed much on the blog. Nonetheless, a goodly percentage of pups become infected–OwyheeStar and other than OwyheeStar. Possibly the biggest culprits are Giardia and Coccidia–one-celled parasites that are found in the environment. To some degree cleaning practices can help avoid these issues; however, puddle-drinkers and paw-lickers can ingest these opportunistic predators. When they do, they can take off like a wildfire in the gut. This scenario is best avoided–it can undo housebreaking at its best. A simple fecal check can help prevent this unraveling adventure no one wants to visit. Of course, keeping the young pup wormed is essential too.

Loose stools can be caused by stress but should you see them it is best to keep an eye on things. The cost of the fecal exam can put your mind at ease. Many times these issues resolve without medication–that is optimal. Pumpkin or squash are helpful. Bloody or mucous filled stools (a bigger concern) should be checked. If you see them, don’t think the worst–so far, no OwyheeStar pup has been lost to the Parvovirus. (I hold my breath as I type that statement, but following our recommendations helps keep your new family member safe). There are a number of things that can bring on such an event (terrible diarrhea)–the parasite infestation, and irritated gut, etc. Some Weims have a very sensitive stomach. The same ones may not leave the woodpile alone or stay out of the trashcan. (oops) It is imperative that you are proactive and find a solution–not only can ingesting these garbage-can-finds be upsetting, but it can also be life-threatening.