Category Archives: Ingested items

Cyclamen

It’s On The List

IMG_3128Yes, I own the Cyclamen that my friend Ellen gave me in June of 2012 when I had major surgery–one of two during the last few years. I love this plant, but I thought since I keep mentioning it I also should say it is toxic to dogs.

Cyclamen (Sowbread) | Scientific Names: Cyclamen spp | Family: Primulaceae

Before we moved into the Farmhouse, I kept the cyclamen in a big bay window not easily accessed by the Weimaraner. Sure if they jumped up on the counter and walked behind my kitchen sink they could have gotten to it. Here I have no such place, so it resides on our kitchen table. If I thought it was going to be a problem, I would need to make a hanger for it and get it up away from their reach. The Cyclamen is one of many plants toxic to the Weimaraner. We often forget the danger.

Click Here to check out the ASPCA’s Toxic and Non-Toxic Plant List

Find out if your houseplants are toxic and if so, take the necessary precautions. Also remember that a lot of common flowers, shrubs, and garden plants are also toxic. I love the above link because it also lists the Non-toxic plants. For example, the African Violet is an excellent choice.

African Violet (Cape Marigold) | Scientific Names: Saintpaulia spp. | Family: Gesneriaceae

Possibly the best way to select a new houseplant is to choose from the Non-toxic plant list. No one wants to see their beloved Weimaraner sick from eating a toxic plant.

Crazy For

Garden Fresh Carrots

20247911_10100293471947178_6621653713752737520_oThe Weimaraner loves their veggies. The fresher the better. Grandma Terri captured this photo of Maverick (a young Blue Longhair Weimaraner) Crazy for her Garden Fresh Carrots. His big sister (Goldee) is a fan too!20273121_10100293477501048_1441024680_o

 

Holly Says

They can’t get enough of their carrots!! My moms have even planted each of them their own veggie half barrels. They can’t wait for things to start sprouting!

Breeder Comment

Many of you who live in Western Oregon know and love Terri Jacobson. She is Grandma extraordinaire and Holly’s Mama too! Beyond those two fabulous roles in her life, she is known to many for her pet and critter photography. She captured these photos last year during a visit to Grandma’s garden.

Safe 4th Of July

graphics-fireworks-399589Happy Birthday, America!

 

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As birthday celebrations go, American’s Independence Day is spectacular. It tends to begin early and drag on for days afterward. This scenario is to many a person and their pet’s chagrin. Even the rock-solid gun dog may well shake and quiver at the barrage of blasts coming from seemingly ever direction. It is no secret that every year shelters are filled to overflowing, and workers are scrambling to reunite pets with their families. We trust everyone has their pet’s microchip on file with AKC Reunite–this can get them back to you quickly should the unthinkable happen.

Separation is not the only untoward situation stemming from this holiday. Fireworks poisoning is a thing–click here to get the details. If it isn’t enough that so many pets are traumatized by the blasts, there are other ways to get into trouble. We don’t want to think about those things on a day like to today, but ingested fireworks can lead to an emergency situation. For the pet that isn’t afraid of anything, they might chase and capture the pod–they might swallow poison or get burned. Then too, while you have your eyes on the sparklers or whatever, who would see the Weimaraner’s stealthy action at the food table or in the garbage. Cooked bones (in particular poultry) can be deadly. Long after the plate is cleaned (or the trash raided) the reality can surface. It is hard to be vigilant 24 X 7 on a day such as today. The Weimaraner is paw-ty smart and manipulative by nature.

Thank you, for including your Weimaraner in the family activities. Only you know what is appropriate. We mention these potential dangers because it is impossible to think of everything in the midst of all we are doing to make the day special. We don’t want your holiday ruined due to one moment you let down your guard. Here’s to hoping everyone comes through without a hitch. Have a fabulous 4th of July!

PS: This photo at the top is of Lily–from her Daycare this week where they celebrated the holiday early.

Insurance

Consider This!

_Rhune's Kula Bleu _1280px[1]The price quotes below are just a sample of what can go wrong. We have heard quotes hovering around the $ 4,000 mark for some procedures–for example, GVD intervention. Bloat can be sudden and is always an emergency. The Weimaraner is one of the targeted breeds for this horrendous life-threatening health issue. Click here to read more. As with humans, there are the typical ailments that can come and rob us of time. We want to eke out as much time together as is possible; insurance can help us get more.

The athletic Weimaraner can suffer a torn or ruptured ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). Possibly if one side goes, then the other will too–according to the experts. Joint replacement is possible. If this happens, you want to be able to take care of your fur family member and best friend.

We don’t make a fee if you sign up for insurance this or other insurance. AKC doesn’t have the only gig in town. Our Vet office prefers Pets Best, but they have had a result with other insurances as well as the AKC recommended.

We received this from AKC

Thanks to amazing advances in veterinary medicine, treatment for your pet’s accidents and illnesses are more successful today – but often at a high cost.

Below is a list of claims paid to our current policyholders. As you can see, it can be expensive to keep our pets healthy! Luckily our pet insurance can help keep costs down for a low monthly premium.

 

Breed Accident/Illness State Total Cost Amount Paid
Old English Sheep Dog Lymphoma TX $1,290 $1,003
Doberman Pinscher Cruciate Tear CA $2,800 $2,202
Beagle Foreign Body Ingestion NC $1,988 $1,500
Bichon Frise Bladder Stones NY $1,301 $1,010

You probably received this from AKC too! We suggest that checking into Major Medical Coverage for your beloved Weimaraner. You don’t want their life cut short, nor for them to have to limp along with a career ending injury. All too soon the end will stare you in the face. All this goodness last but a season it seems.

Don’t Eat the Tulips

Not A Salad!

18119379_10154241739531612_8739486530847479049_nWe all know all too well our beloved Weims can eat almost anything. These photos tell a story. Can we all see the wheels turning? Why would I want my chew stick when there are the beautiful tulips waiting to be picked? 17990739_10154241739566612_1832225702496365279_n

Not every lovely plant is safe for the Weimaraner. Tulips are #6 on the list and follow the daffodil–click here for Web MD’s List. Their list is short if you search you find the number of dangerous plants to your dog is lengthy.

Christmas Puppy

What’s Up?

What’s a sugar plum?  Can I eat it or play with it?

Iimg_4059t was a cold and winter-white afternoon. Lunch being made we were whisked to a safe place today. I and like others found myself crated out of the way. There was the hustle and bustle as Mom had enlisted some extra muscle.

Boxes and crates were being taken down. Treasures unpacked all around. Cinnamon and spice and everything nice filled my senses and caused me to yearn. Groceries came earlier I was to learn. There was pumpkin, apples, and mincemeat pies. Turkey was roasting –no great surprise. Our moans were hushed with a treat meant to suffice. The unpacking, baking and general melee went on into the night.

Along the way, we had our run. We ate our supper, but of turkey there was none. We dreamed of raiding the trash cans someday. Opportunity certainly was not on its way.

From our vantage all good things out of reach. We awaited our moment, an opportunity to streak. Big red balls on the tree were strung. Then came the paper, the ribbons, the candy, but dog treats there were none. (What?)

Soon the release and we dash for the tree. We can knock it over and strip it with glee. I’ll take the angel you get a ribbon. We will run through the house racetrack on the chase. What a holiday game they have prepared.

Oh now look they are making things more fun. What is this a paper fest? Look at the packages, bags, and ribbons. What joy we will have stripping them clean. We will get this place in order soon but what of the tree? The tree is a bit large to drag–but oh what a great pee-post it will make. I’m not into clothes you see, however, the tree skirt would make a perfect cape for me.

wendy-roo-and-santa-2016

Wendy, Roo, and

Just when we thought it could get no better–out came the gingerbread village. Yum and woof woof. Our tummies are rolling the juices are flowing. We can’t believe it– such a great day is being planned all for our fun.

Woof did you say we were having ham tomorrow??? Oh, how we love Christmas!

Dusty

Dusty has a Job

dusty-for-chewy-com_0587He has been practicing his product presentation. He was particularly happy with himself when it came to Fortiflora and Zukes Minis

If you have been to the Vet for antibiotics or vaccine now is the time to add some good bacteria to your Weim’s gut. It would even be better to add some just before the vaccine. There are many times when the addition of some bacteria is a good idea. fortifloraYogurt (with live cultures) can be an option; however, it doesn’t come close to offering the same outcome. Keep this on your shelf. Click here to purchase from Chewy.com.

  • Helps reduce flatulence (gas) in dogs and contains 100 Million live microorganisms
  • Proven to promote intestinal health & balance with microencapsulated probiotics, which guarantees that they arrive alive in your pet’s digestive tract
  • Contains antioxidant vitamins E, C and beta-carotene which have been shown to support a strong immune system
  • Tastes great, has excellent palatability and may even increase a pet’s desire to eat
  • Easy to feed – just sprinkle on your pet’s food

 

Thanksgiving 2016

Celebrate

       ~ Please Keep In Mind

10703995_10203865392493285_2238146014813983610_n (1)We send you the warmest of greetings. Thank you for your faithful friendship. We value our relationship. It is the season to give thanks and to remember all we have to celebrate.

  1. We are thankful for our family.
  2. We are thankful for the life we can lead–thank you to those who made this possible. (veterans, and those who paid the ultimate sacrifice–including their families).
  3. We are thankful to our God for his provision
  4. We are thankful for our friends, and clients–many times they are one in the same.

Today–it will find many of you traveling, or scurrying to make-ready. We, likewise, have things associated with the Thanksgiving holiday to prepare for as well as our usual daily hoopla. We cannot omit the fact that we are thankful for the Weimaraner. This fact goes without saying. It speaks to the heart of our life; these wonderful fur family members are those who bring a smile to so many people every day.

 Preventing the Unthinkable

The last thing any of us want is a trip to the emergency room (albeit for a human, or the Weimaraner). This scenario is never truer than in the midst of a holiday. Unfortunately, this is a time when we can become distracted for a moment, or miss what is happening. It is hard to keep an eye on all the well-meaning guests who want to sneak a tidbit to the Weim, or the plates left unattended. Here are some things to keep forefront in your mind during our celebration.

  1. Counter-surfing — it takes a moment, and they have snatched it.
  2. Trash-raiding — make sure it is Weimaraner safe. Ingested cooked turkey bones, foil, string, and a myriad of other items can lead to emergency surgery.
  3. Skip the bones entirely — you might want to treat them, but things can go awry.
  4. Table scraps need to be carefully monitored. With guests sneaking them a bit here and there, it can easily get out of control. These rich additions can upset their tummy, or trigger a more severe condition. For example, the turkey skin might seem harmless, but the fatty morsel (or too much human food in general) could trigger a pancreatic attack. Weims tend to have a sensitive tummy; however, the important thing is to remember a dog cannot handle all this fatty and calorie-laden holiday food (or the trimmings). The best approach would be to set a dish of allowed scraps and tell people they must not have any more than what is on the plate. This strategy may not prevent the well-meaning guest from giving them the forbidden.
  5. Ingested rising bread or roll dough stories abound on the Internet. Yes, it does pose a danger. Cake, and yeasty bread batter when ingested, expands rapidly in the dog’s gut.
  6. The dangers are not limited to what we plan to eat. Remember the risk includes candles, cut flowers, alcohol, potpourri, etc.
  7. Finally, do not forget about things like sugarless gum, candy, etc. The Weimaraner is opportunistic, and they can find a jelly bean at the bottom of someone’s handbag.

Manners and Your Guests

Respect is a two-way street. Some Weimaraners will jump up, and they do it playfully. They may like to nibble or corn-bite as some call it, or even nip when they get excited. Their toenails could catch grandma’s skin, and cause an unintentional dangerous scratch–looking like an encounter with a knife. They could knock a child or unstable person to the ground. Even the well-mannered dog could be playing, and someone could catch a tooth. Unfortunately, this can lead to serious problems–a trip to the emergency room, reports filed, and people making accusations about your Weimaraner. Another side of the issue is you don’t know what someone is doing to the Weimaraner when you are not looking. Things can go awry in fast order if the family pet becomes challenged, afraid, or territorial. Make every effort to avoid these situations. It is not unthinkable to use a crate–when you cannot be in control of the situation. The saying– it is better safe than sorry is true.

We cannot say what is the best situation for you, and your gathering. We suggest you proceed with caution. The crate-trained Weimaraner might be safer in their den. Putting them out in the yard, while everyone is inside can also cause issues. The Weimaraner is like a child who never grows up. The high energy filled Weimaraner doesn’t stand down. The aroma stimulates and fuels their excitement. Ultimately, we all want them to be a huge part of everything we do. They require supervision. 

The Weimaraner is part of your family. You must plan for them like everyone else. Thank you for remembering that during this holiday season.

 

Berry Picking

~With Maizie

LaBash's Maizie at the Rose GardenWhile the folks picked huckleberries and filled their buckets, I filled my tummy!

Linda writes

Maizie, the Huckleberry picking queen! We didn’t do bad either. 

I have been picking huckleberries at Lost Lake since the 70’s–and this is the best I have ever seen it! We came home with 3 gallons!

Breeder Comment

13501579_562233180628277_6417558351075309623_nMaize is an amazing girl. She goes on many adventures other than berry picking. Here are a few of those adventures; however, life is a daily run. Those feet keep her going. Maybe she needs some Musher’s Secret–a year-round foot conditioner that protects the paws. Give it a try!

Why oh Why?

Quirks and Quandaries

Many years of working with the Weimaraner and people associated with the breed have taught us a few things. One to keep in mind is that even though you have had the breed before it doesn’t ensure smooth sailing. The twists and turns of getting them raised can take a sudden spin and normally this in direct response to human error. Very often, this associated issue develops when it appears you are doing everything right. It has always worked before; however, those with multiple children will tell you that even with the same parents (and DNA pool) no two are identical. Each must be considered for the person they are and what works for them. A stressor for one is of no concern to another. With that in mind, we saw this comment from an OwyheeStar Client. Here is their response to a blog posted last week.

Hi we received a puppy from you, Bella from the litter on May 5, 2015. We are experiencing something I’m not sure how to deal with. When Jon and I go to work or at night when we are asleep, she is chewing holes in our drywall. She is exercised two a day off leash. She has plenty of toys and chew things. We know it is separation anxiety (except that we are home at night). We’re not sure how to address this. We’ve never had a dog do this before and we previously owned two Weimies.

 

Jardine's Trigger_n

Trigger

A few of Bella’s Littermates

Please note this is not the Bella featured in Sunday’s Blog. Nevertheless, this Bella is a littermate to two recently featured Weims–Bentley and Molly. Trigger is also a littermate.  You may well remember Trigger because he was lost and found and his story of recovery was featured on this blog too!

Sheetrock Chewing

This hole-in-the-wall-chewing is not an uncommon occurrence with this breed. Nevertheless, we have written about this on several occasions, and it is a behavior best avoided akin to digging, incessant barking, and chewing on the house siding. These behaviors can begin during a stressful situation or a transition period–some call them ‘fear periods’ during the developmental first three years. Yes, I said three years. The Weimaraner can demonstrate a teenage-type of flakiness that rivals the human counterpart.

The only response we know is to reel in the Weimaraner and to rely on the crate. Freedom must be earned. Continued freedom and allowance of this or any unwanted activity will ingrain it, and it can become nearly impossible to break the cycle. With the smallest stress, they may sneak around and find a place to chew for comfort or to let off the stress. No doubt the incurring response creates further anxiety and fuels the issue in many cases.

Unwanted Behaviors Thwarted

This (and other) undesirable behaviors can be overcome; however, the key is finding an approach that works. Being calm and proactive will serve you well. We recommend using the crate and supervising all activities until the behavior no longer becomes an issue. Positive reinforcement and getting them to realize you do not want this behavior is a plus. Stay calm and this means inside. If you are upset by the hole in the drywall (and who wouldn’t be?) then, this can add to the problem. Maybe some of you readers can speak to this situation. Please feel free to share your experience if you have overcome a quirky behavior situation. We appreciate your positive and appropriate suggestions. Cliff and I thank you in advance.

Please Note: A rehomed Weimaraner would also experience this type of stressor and can quickly become unmanageable. Change in a schedule, location, your attention, etc. are all potential catalysts.