Category Archives: Hot Topics

What About

Worms

      ~and Other Parasites

3-Juniper X Boone 2018 Wk3-17This topic (of worms) is not one we like to discuss unless we are talking about putting the fishing worm on the hook–even then, to many it is a nauseating thought. Nonetheless, worms and parasites are opportunistic. They find ways to survive inside your pet as well as in extreme environmental conditions. Dog’s Naturally has posted some natural solutions that you might find helpful. Here is their article —click here to find out more.

Signs of Worms

Some worms cause more obvious symptoms than others. I’ve provided more specific symptom information below along with information about the different types of worms (See Types of Worms below) … but here are a few clues your dog may give you that could mean he has worms:

  • Intermittent or frequent diarrhea or vomiting can be signs your dog has worms.
  • Your dog may have a fever.
  • He may scoot and lick his rear (though scooting can mean other things too).
  • Your dog may be off his food or be a little lethargic; his coat may look dull.
  • You might see stools that are coated in mucus (but otherwise look normal).
  • Or you might see squiggly worms or “rice bodies” in his stool.

But some worms can’t be seen with the naked eye, so if your dog’s showing some of these signs, you might want to get a fecal sample analyzed by your vet.

Cliff and I suggest you keep your eye on the pooh–I know it doesn’t sound lovely, but getting a fecal check can help you avoid some of the more unpleasant scenarios. A loose stool doesn’t always mean there is something amiss, but when something like that happens, you want to keep watch. Of course, we love adding the pumpkin (or even banana squash). We are planting Banana Squash in our garden. Right now I only have two hills ready to plant. I would like more, but we have to see if we can make more room. Last year, I baked the banana squash and frozen it in chunks for easy serving. The Weims love it!

Pushkin

Roadtrip

     ~Coping with Excess Energy 

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Pushkin and I are preparing for a long road trip to Arizona to move my mother into an assisted living facility. Once that has been taken care of we are going on to the Chaco Canyons of New Mexico.  It is the oldest Anasazi site in the U.S. In preparation for the trip to Arizona, we took a trip from Salem to Kennewick to see my grandchildren.

What I learned on the drive was that we had to stop quite often, not because Push had to “potty” but because he needed exercise. Once he was out of the car and we walked for a bit he settled right down when we started up again. At every rest stop, someone would comment on what a beautiful dog he is. I have attached some pictures for you. The man is my son, the children are obviously my grandchildren. I am not sure who that white-haired old woman is, could it be me?😏

What a great dog he is!
Marie

Breeder Comment

Thanks for the great share–we are excited you’re traveling together. That is fun. We loved your pointer on burning off the excess energy. It is good for humans as well.
One suggestion we might have is to be careful about dusty areas you visit while in the Southwest. Valley Fever in dogs is a thing. We would not want anything to happen to the lovely Puskin. Click here to read a bit about this potential risk. 

In the News

Puppy Carryon

     ~ Common Sense Lacking

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Sen. Marisol Alcantara speaks to protesters demanding justice for Kokito outside LaGuardia Airport. To her right is one of the dog’s owners, 11-year-old Sophia Ceballos.
 (ANDREW SAVULICH/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

Cliff and I have watched, listened, and been saddened by the recent news of the United Airlines craziness. Honestly, I have carried a puppy home on the airplane before. My ticket was with Delta; however, on one leg of the flight home, I was diverted to a United Flight. It was not necessarily a good experience. I received a less than welcome attitude and got a lecture about carryon protocol–it was a rather demeaning lecture. I bite my tongue because I needed to get home with the puppy.

Would I carry on again? Indeed I would. It is an excellent way to travel with a puppy. OwyheeStar has more clients than you can imagine who fly into Boise and bring their puppy home as their carryon. You might be shocked to hear us say it is much safer than a road trip. Avoiding exposure to the deadly Parvovirus is one of the reasons. Nevertheless, getting them home and off to a grand start with the least amount of stress (and risk) possible is essential.

What went wrong? United Airlines Flight Attendant told someone to put their dog in the overhead storage. How insane is that? Honestly, I would have gotten off the plane. I would have made a formal complaint. What is worse is this is a short-snouted dog. Anyone who has dealt with the airlines knows they ask about the breed and they have a specific protocol for these breeds who are prone to breathing issues. (OMG) This loss should not have happened–the owner has to protect the dog’s life always. You are responsible for the ultimate decisions whether you are at a Vet office, a dog park, or planning to fly with a puppy.

We are beyond saddened by this incident. The bulk of the blame is on the flight attendant. Whatever was she thinking? Nevertheless, we are the gatekeeper. You have to make sure your dog is safe. The carryon protocol has always been to use an appropriate airline approved bag which fits under the seat. We have put the bag under the seat for takeoff and landing. Otherwise, I held the bag on my lap–sometimes inserting my hand into the Sherpa Carrier. In twenty plus years of folks flying into to get the puppy as a carryon, there was one incident where the airline was being crazy. The person booked a flight home on another airline. The airline (not United) got a letter from this family who travels extensively with their dogs because they use them as therapy dogs.

Click here to read United Airlines response to this heartbreaking incident.

Two days later there was another mixup. This time due to a connecting flight error in Denver. Honestly, a large number of live animals fly without incident. Nonetheless, connecting flights increase the risk. The scenic route (via Japan) was a pretty significant mistake. Regardless, they were chartered to the new Kansas family awaiting their pet’s arrival. (OMG)

 

 

Talking About

The Longhair

        ~Part ThreeStackhouse-4964-2 11.08.45 AM

To sum up our previous two discussions in a few words is difficult. We talked about the DNA factor. How it requires both parents to carry the fluffy coat (Longhair) DNA marker to produce Longhair pups. We talked about how difficult it is to see the difference at birth and the DNA testing we do to ensure we have the pups labeled accurately. Finally, we discussed the feathering and showed you a decent photo of what you might expect. What else is there to talk about? Read on to hear what others say about the Longhair Weimaraner–sometimes called the other Weimaraner.

W.W. Denlinger (*)

        ~In Regards to the Longhair

The ideal hair length is between long and shorthair in the range of the original coarse. It should be smooth and thick with a water repellent undercoat, resistant to weather and thorns. At the same time, it should not be too sensitive to dirt and burrs.

The long-haired Weimaraner has been described as conforming to the Standard for the short-haired dog in every respect except for the length of coat. At birth, the coat of the SH Weimaraner is inclined to be rather crisp, with definite stripes which disappear within a short time.That of the LH Weimaraner is soft and wooly at birth, and has no stripes. The coat of the mature dog, no longer wooly, has a silky texture, and is straight or slightly wavy. On the upper part of the body, the coat is tighter than on the SH dog; on the lower part, it is not so tight. The outer sides of the ears are covered with long, soft, silky hair. The tail, which is not docked as is that of the SH Weimaraner, is heavily feathered so that in the field the dog appears to have a graceful plume-like flag.There is soft feathering on the backs of the legs, and between the toes

*As reported for the Weimaraner Club of America by Deborah Andrews
Weimaraner Club of America Liaison to the German Weimaraner Klub e.V.
http://www.weimclubamerica.org/worldweims/longhair/
Denlinger, W.,  The Complete Weimaraner, p. 183, retrieved from (http://www.weimclubamerica.org/worldweims/longhair/article06.html).

Talking About

The Longhair

     ~ Part One

Stackhouse_9693

Stackhouse, the infamous OwyheeStar Gray Longhair Stud Dog, was featured on yesterday’s blog. Many of our readers have gorgeous pups from a Stackhouse-sired litter. You might find it interesting to note that there are more smooth coats than longhairs. To get a litter in which the longhair pups present requires a Mama who carries the DNA marker for the fluffy-coat, too! Even when they do, unless they are also a Longhair (and not just a Carrier), only a portion of the litter will have the longer coat length.

The Affected and The Carrier

When mating the Affected (a Longhair such as Stackhouse) with a Weimaraner who is a Carrier (such as Dazee) statistically, we should be able to expect 50% of the pups to be Longhairs. Over the last decade plus, we have learned this is an average and not a guarantee. (Ha!) For example, we mated the same pair two years in a row. The first year we only had two longhairs in a litter of eight pups. The next year (with the same everything) we had six longhairs in a litter of eight. It is like everything Weimaraner; predictions are nearly impossible.

Two Carriers mated are said to result in a 25% longhair to smooth coat ratio. There are other factors, but as with the aforementioned (Longhair to Carrier) scenario, it is impossible to predict the outcome. On a couple of occasions, the Carrier to Carrier mating produced no longhairs-othertimes, the result was near the 50% ratio. It is difficult for everyone who is hoping for the Longhair arrival status.

Many folks covet the smooth coats out of such a mating. Their coats tend to be thicker and velvet-like. Waterfowl hunters like to find such a pup because the coat is not only a bit warmer but water resistant. Sure they still get wet, but there is a measure of protection.

The Hair Factor

There is no doubt that the Longhairs are a bit messier; however, it is nothing as you imagine. Unlike the more popular Labrador, the Longhair Weimaraner doesn’t deposit hair all over you and your belongings. It is hard to believe this as being true–especially if you are coming from a situation where you are vacuuming hair from a fur family member who has been gone for some time. It is good to keep them groomed, but even for those that go natural, it is shocking how little they shed.

Longhair Discussions

Stackhouse_9692This blog is the first in a short series discussing the Longhair Weimaraner. Some of you are adverse to the idea of the tendrils (or the feathering) and a fluffy tail. Others are intrigued, and still many of you have both a Longhair and a traditional smooth coat Weimaraner.

We might also mention that the Longhair coat varies widely–some are thick, but more often they are similar looking to the classic look with the feathering on the ears and legs. Oh and then there is the ever so slight additional fluff on the face that almost speaks to a teddy bear look.

The Longhair always sports the undocked tail (unless there was a mistaken assumption that they were a smooth coat). Expedited DNA Testing helps prevent such an error. The newborn pups (longhair and traditional) are nearly impossible to sort; therefore, to ensure accuracy, we do the DNA testing.

 

 

Things To Know

About Parvovirus

     ~From The Animal Foundation

Canine parvovirus (commonly called parvo) is a highly contagious viral disease that can produce a life-threatening illness in puppies and dogs. It can be transmitted by any person, animal or object that comes in contact with an infected dog’s feces.

Puppies, adolescent dogs, and adult dogs who are not vaccinated are at risk of contracting the virus. Protecting your puppy or dog from parvovirus could save his life.

Keep your dog healthy and parvo-free with these 8 tips:

  1. Make sure your dog is properly vaccinated. Puppies should receive their first vaccines at 6-8 weeks of age; boosters should be administered at three-week intervals until the puppy is 16 weeks of age, and then again at one year of age. Previously vaccinated adult dogs need boosters every year. Visit The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic for affordable vaccines administered seven days a week — no appointment needed!

  2. Limit your puppy or unvaccinated dog’s exposure to other dogs until he’s had his first two vaccinations, unless you are sure the other dogs are fully vaccinated.

  3. Avoid places where your puppy or unvaccinated dog could be exposed to parvovirus from unvaccinated dogs. Dog parks, pet stores, play groups, and other public areas should be avoided until your dog or puppy is fully vaccinated.

  4. When visiting your vet for wellness check-ups and vaccinations, carry your puppy in your arms outside and leave him on your lap while waiting in the lobby. Walking where other dogs have walked and gone to the bathroom will increase your puppy’s risk of contracting disease.

  5. Parvovirus is very difficult to kill and can live in the environment for over a year. If you suspect your house or yard has been infected, clean with a 1:32 dilution of bleach (1/2 cup bleach in a gallon of water). Regular soaps and disinfectants DO NOT kill parvovirus. Areas that cannot be cleaned with bleach may remain contaminated. Remember, the virus can survive on a variety of objects, including food bowls, shoes, clothes, carpet and floors.

  6. If you work or spend time in places where you have contact with dogs, change your clothes and shoes before returning home to your dog or puppy.

  7. If your dog or puppy is vomiting, has diarrhea, is not eating or is lethargic, you should take him to the vet as soon as possible. These are all symptoms of parvovirus. Remember, Infected dogs may show only one symptom!

  8. If you are considering adopting a new dog, we encourage leaving your unvaccinated puppies or dogs at home. It is very important to do a meet and greet, but take the time to make sure your dog is fully vaccinated first!

For more information on canine parvovirus, visit the American Veterinary Medical Association or the ASPCA online. And don’t forget to regularly vaccinate your dog! Click here for The Animal Foundation’s Low-Cost Vaccine Clinic Hours and Pricing.

OwyheeStar Comment2-Bernie X Boone 2017 WK3-48

The above post was from the www.animalfoundation.com — which is verbatim from their Website. The dangers of the parvovirus are well documented. While many of these recommendations seem absurd, there is a good reason for the concerns. All too often people unknowingly take their new puppy out to show them off in public–like to the pet store. The same place where the person with an infected puppy visit. Sadly, you have to stay away from this kind of place and pet areas during the first 16-20 weeks. We recommend getting the sixteen-week vaccine titer test for a lot of reasons. One benefit is the test results will indicate if your Weimaraner has immunity or now. You also avoid the potential severe vaccine reaction that affects around 8% of Weimaraners. These vaccine reactions are equally life-threatening. Get the vaccine titer test–if your puppy has immunity then you can out and about sooner. :O)

In twenty years, we have not had a single case of Parvo strike an OwyheeStar puppy. A lot of things have happened, but so far, we have been fortunate. We would like to keep it that way. Many of these symptoms can occur from other issues–for example, parasites. This is especially true of the nasty one-celled varieties like Giardia or Coccidia. Nonetheless, while the symptoms are horrid, it is far more treatable than the parvovirus.

We agree with the dangers of this virus, but for your Weimaraner, we recommend a different vaccine protocol. One that is very similar to that recommended by the Weimaraner Club of America (WCA). If you get a puppy from us, that protocol is found in the OwyheeStar Health Record.

Age

Your Weim’s Age 

      ~ in human years

 

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Dusty at 12.5 Years still looking cute

We’ve all see the charts that convert the canine companion’s age to the equivalent in human years. Recently, the last couple of days, I received one in my Email from the Farmer’s Almanac. You would think they would have it right; however, I knew it could not be accurate because they lump all dogs into the same chart. The AKC has a chart that breaks out the age according to the breed size–anything over 50 Lbs is considered Large Breed. Without a doubt, the Farmer’s Almanac is based on a small-sized dog. Here is the chart showing how to convert your dog’s age to human years compliments of the American Kennel Club (AKC).

 

DogYears_Infographic

 

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Dusty and his littermates–Cesar’s Mom shared this with us.

Time flies by so quickly. It is hard to realize they will only be with us for a decade or more if things go well. (OMG) A few Weimaraner live to see sixteen years. I believe this is due to the luck of the draw and extraordinary care. Nonetheless, sometimes things don’t go as planned. We just learned that Dusty’s brother (Cesar) passed on in 2013 due to an issue with his spleen. I have heard of this happening in other breeds (mostly with the German Shorthair Pointer), but it could happen to any dog. I am going, to be honest, I am glad I didn’t know about this before now, for I might have worried way too much. That is a silly thing to do because all the pups in a litter are unique.

 

We all hope for sixteen years. It is not realistic. A few will get the extraordinary gift of sharing their lives for more than 14 years. What can we say? It is hard to talk about this topic and to realize that to love eventually means to let them go when the time comes. It is beyond painful for the reasons you understand. I am hoping Dusty will be around for a while longer.

I also learned that Cesar’s Mom was able to get a female (that they call Daisy) from Dusty’s lineage from a Midwest breeder that we have worked with over the last decade. Sometimes life is kind even when things don’t go as expected.

Tough Decisions

Mixed Information

 

2-Bernie X Boone 2017 WK3-48

What do you mean I will eventually need to be altered? I thought I was perfect!

 

 

 

Cliff fields a lot of questions about spaying and neutering the Weimaraner. The information on the Internet is mixed and often confusing.

The OwyheeStar basic guideline for spaying a female is the same as altering the male–no earlier than six months, and possibly closer to eight months. It depends upon your pup’s development and environment.

Each situation is unique, but for the vast majority of our clients somewhere between 7-8 months is going to work well. Margaret V. Root Kustritz, DVM, Ph.D., is an expert on the topic of reproduction. Click here to read the in-depth article written by Dr. Kustritz, and to learn more about what she has to say! Margaret gave us permission to republish her articles (July 2007), but they are more readily available today.

It is no secret that the push to get pets altered is an effort to prevent unplanned litters; this is rightly so too! The pups (born to unplanned litters) often turn into beautiful pets. Sadly though, all too many of these dogs end up in a shelter or rescue situation. Responsible pet owners spay and neuter their pets. How and when they do this may vary, but until their pet is altered, the human caregiver is charged with keeping them safe–including from mating with other dogs of opportunity.

Note: This information is from a previous blog and we felt it was time to share it again. We are getting a lot of inquiries about spaying and neutering timeframes. People go from one extreme to another–some want to alter was too early (in our opinion), and others prefer not to alter their pet. Here are some additional bits of information on this topic.

Pushkin

Overall we are doing WellClement's Pushkin3238

I set up the crate – left the door open and Pushkin went right in – kennel arrives on Tuesday. So far only one accident in the house.

Oh, and outdoors we have a little challenge. It is pouring rain here, and the ground is saturated and muddy. Yes, we have grass, but it is that wet. Do you have a recommendation as to something that can be put down as a ground cover?

Wishing you well.
Marie

Breeder Comment

 

Kudos to you for keeping accidents to a minimum. Getting the housebreaking done right early on is vital. You know that! So, that is fabulous.

It doesn’t matter when you get your puppy; there is always some challenge. Wow! That is a lot of rain, but then we are talking Oregon–and not our side of the state either. I suggest you try some sand. It should be OK except for tracking it into the house. Nevertheless, it will help with that mud situation. I wish we could buy two truckloads here, but the rain and mud will soon be history. Afterall, it is far Eastern Oregon–the high desert that is typically arid.

Sand should not be a problem. Removal should be relatively easy once you no longer need it. Scoop up the excess and put it wherever. Wash the remainder into the ground. The cool, wet weather is also ideal for one-celled organisms such as Giardia and Coccidia. Birds and other critters can bring this into your yard, and it can thrive in a wet environment. Therefore, getting a fecal check at the 9-week puppy visit and possibly again at the 12-week visit would be a wise investment. A garden sprayer loaded with 10% bleach solution used in between visits –or even once a day might help eradicate this issue. (No, the bleach will not hurt your lawn.) Sure picking up after the Weimaraner will make a difference; however, there are plenty of ways they can ingest a cyst. Everything goes in the mouth–including their paws.

When a pup leaves OwyheeStar they are parasite free; however, this can change in a blink of an eye. These opportunistic one-celled parasites are in our environment. We talk a lot about avoiding Paravirus infected locations, but most of those high-traffic areas are infected with the one-celled organisms too. The reality seems to be that some Weimaraners are more prone to picking up this type of infection. It is a nasty affair, and it can set back the housebreaking progress. Here’s to hoping everyone escapes this mishap.

The Wire Crate

Marie has purchased the Life Stages Wire Kennel or Crate for Indoor Use. This crate features a divider that allows you to adjust the size. We just wanted to point out the divider and how it works. Excellent job Marie.

Berkley

In The Groove

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Berkley is settling well into the routine of our family. She loves her walks. She likes to eat ice. She’s learning lots of commands and especially how to contain her enthusiasm by NOT jumping up on people. She thinks the living room is her jungle gym, jumping from chair to couch with very little effort. We’re working on curbing that. She has begun meeting other dogs and is showing an appropriate blend of curiosity and submission. She also enjoys riding in the car.

Pizza For Dinner20171121_182244

Her naughtiest moment so far (which really is not her fault…Blame it on her nose and on my husband) : My husband got a pizza out to put in the oven. She was sleeping peacefully on the couch at the time. He intended to return promptly to put it in the over so it would be ready for my return home, but he got sidetracked and forgot. When I came home he remembered that he didn’t put the pizza in the oven. I said, “no problem, I’ll put it in.” As I entered the kitchen, I realized that Berkley had pulled the pizza off the counter and eaten half of it! Thankfully, other than a little gas and the need to go outside in the middle of the night (which my husband took care of), she was fine.

Preventative Action

Sooooo…our friends showed us a trick to keep her paws off of the counter and it’s working so far. The second she puts her paws up on the counter, we shake this thing we made out of foil pans. It is so startling she takes off running and several days go by before she attempts to put her paws up again. As you can see from the picture, she is sitting on the chair in the background quite content to be away from the scary shiny shaker. As long as we have it on the counter she remembers to stay down. Our former Weimie had the same tendency… Such a good nose and such a strong desire for food!
One of my favorite times of the day is when, after the kids are in bed, she snuggles up on the couch with me, tuckered out from the day’s activities.
Berkley is a tremendous source of laughter and entertainment in our family, and we are thrilled to be making memories with her!!!
Thanks again for making such a great match!
Sincerely,
Amanda

Breeder Comment

We are delighted to hear of your continued success and joy. We are in the business of making dreams come true–at least that is our goal. This breed is not for everyone. Anyone who loves the Weimaraner finds they both want to expound on the fabulous life with the Weimar and at the same time warn others it is not all that easy to raise one.

You are doing fabulous! I think it is vital to get the basics done; then you work on things such as counter-surfing, living room agility, and meet-and-greet techniques. Nonetheless, a friendly, happy, and active Weimaraner is a delight. I am sure we can agree on that fact.

Some of our readers recently began the training of a Weimar pup. They quickly learned that freedom is earned. You want to get the housebreaking, crate-training, and the desire to please engrained very soon. Then you can move on to other things–like compliance on the leash. We were so thrilled to see not all that long ago you had achieved excellent loose-leash-compliance. (Click here to read the previous Berkley update.) Those things go a long way toward having a well-adjusted and easier to live with Weimaraner. Keep up the great effort and thank you for thinking of us.

Final Thought 

For those embarking on a journey–remember not to compare your situation with others. They (like this family) can give you hope of what can be achieved. Nevertheless, each family is unique. This adventure is a journey. It takes as long as it takes. It is a one-step at a time thing. Achieve the basics, so you have the solid foundation. Then, together, you can see what you can become.