Category Archives: Hot Topics

The Blog, Posts, and Whatnot!

Dear OwyheeStar Faithful,

The Information Age has changed everything. Getting published and putting your story out there for the public has never been easier. The truth of it is startling when you think about how it has changed our world.

Every day we post a blog. That is 365 blogs a year. (Whew) Without our OwyheeStar Weimaraner clients sending us photos and their stories to post we would be lost. In this day, when everyone has their Facebook Page and possibly a blog, many of you share their story without us being in the loop. This self-publishing thing is a reality for us.

We have out OwyheeStar Weimaraner Group–a community where those who have a puppy from us can share their photos and news. They can exchange ideas. People seem to like that–and again, we appreciate your posts. Nevertheless, we depend upon the kindness of others for our blog fodder. It is a lifeline–that makes publishing everyday doable.

From the Archives Indi and Ilsa

A lot of folks are posting their stories — I find some of them on Facebook. Thank you–it means the world to see your OwyheeStar is cherished, celebrated, and an integral part of the family activities. Honestly, I am saddened when I look at a profile that doesn’t contain the Weimaraner. It makes me wonder what has become of the beloved Weimaraner puppy.

If you happened to have a cute story you would be willing to let me share please Email it to me. I will also need a photo. Frequently people send only a few words and some photos. I love them, but filling in the storyline is difficult–essentially impossible. So, let me thank those of you who update us annually or several times a year. I cannot thank you enough. If you have promised an update and not yet sent it, now would be a good time.

Parvo Paranoia

~ Real or Imagined

Our Client Asked —

Luna not too long before she joined her family.

Is the Parvo virus threat just until they get through their 16 week Titler test? Or is it until they reach a certain age? Just a little unclear what constitutes them being safe for public areas/dog parks etc. If you get the titer test done at 16 weeks it will show if she has immunity to Parvo and if you also have her tested for the Distemper it would also show that. Last time we just tested for the Parvo because Distemper just is not something they are seeing in our area. 

OwyheeStar’s Response

Parvo is a very real risk. Ask any Vet office and they will tell you that the risk is out there, and it is beyond sad when a puppy comes in and they are determined infected. We have never had an OwyheeStar puppy diagnosed with Parvo. Nonetheless, even though nowhere in the Pacific NW is listed as a ‘Hot Spot’ we still need to exercise caution.

I think if you take your puppy for a walk in the neighborhood you should wipe the feet (not let them lick her paws) and make sure they are not investigating a lot of areas where the ground might be infected. In all likelihood, your local neighborhood (if it is a low traffic area) may be fairly safe.

So what do I mean by low traffic? A place less traveled by those with pups. Any area where people are taking random puppies (which might be unknowingly infected). It is understandable that the owner doesn’t yet have a clue. The pups begin shedding the virus long before there is a definitive sign that they are ill. So they are leaving behind the virus everywhere. Of course, they are infecting the ground. But did you know if you viewed this virus under the microscope that one end is barbed–it sticks to clothing, shoes, etc. It is very portable which makes the spread even more commonplace.

More Information

Here are a couple of links that talk about the prevalence of Parvo and how to avoid it—and while it sounds paranoid, you want to socialize the puppy BUT avoid risk.  

Parvo In Puppies

Parvo Virus in Dogs

Precautions

~We are extra careful

We always leave the pups in the car (when scheduled for the Veterinary Wellness) until the room is ready at the Vet office. It is essential to avoid exposure—to Parvo, Kennel Cough, etc. We never take a young dog that doesn’t have immunity to public places including pet stores (where well-meaning folks might share the virus) such a  Pet Store, Park, Dog Area, or even to socialize at the local Farm Store– etc.

The Vaccine Titer Test

Once the Titer test shows immunity (with a high titer count) you are good to go. We honestly believe if you follow our vaccine protocol you will attain protection. Then by getting the sixteen-week titer test (instead of the typical puppy shot) it is going to allow you to have the freedom to be anywhere. In the meantime though, visit friends homes in a fenced back yard—where pets are vaccinated, etc. Figure out ways to safely socialize your puppy–a hundred different touches in a hundred days would be a good goal. Do what you can–but be safe, my friend.

First Christmas

    ~With Chester in Oregon

Chester has been helping Mama wrap presents and when I say help, but I mean stealing all the presents and trying to run away with them. Luckily I have caught him before the presents are ruined. I think Chester is worried he is on the naughty list because he has decided to bark at my Santa on the mantel then proceed to run away. He brings me so much joy and laughter. Brandon and I both love him so much! Happy holidays!

Yuppers I am having my first Christmas

Breeder Comment

We are ever so thankful to you folks–and happy for Chester.

Santa–well maybe we can consider that a fat guy dressed in red who suddenly appears to stare at Chester, is a bit disconcerting. Where did he come from? He wasn’t there before. And he just stares at me with those twinkly eyes, Mom. What’s up with that?

Pie Anyone?

Maybe you noticed Nancy’s post regarding Luna and Tikka’s clever pie snatching –or maybe I should say sampling trick. It is too good to not borrow, so I asked Nancy for her permission. (Haha) It seemed like a good Sunday post.

Nancy writes, “When I got back in my truck and checked the pie (that I had hidden under the blanket) “Oh good, the lid’s still on!” “Good girls!” … Upon closer examination, I realize that they weren’t good girls, just clever girls for somehow getting the lid back in place!”

What To Do?

Upsampled Pie Squares, of course!

“Here’s what you do with pumpkin pie that the Weims have sampled.”

😊

Breeder Comment

Well, Nancy, this is perfect example of so many things Weimar related.

  1. How the Weimaraner can find a way, to get their way.
  2. How on the surface things look okay until you find it is not.
  3. How the experienced Weim-person figures a way to make something positive out of what is left. (Haha)

I seriously expect that Tikka and Luna had the  pie leftovers. So things worked out for them. I think it is amazing they didn’t eat the whole pie. 

Tikka says it was mostly Luna–look she has the horn to prove it.

Product Review

Breeder Comment

Dear Weimlovers and OwyheeStar Fans!

You know us well, I think. We don’t make a habit of endorsing products unless it is something we believe in and want to recommend. You might remember we are reviewing products for Chewy.com. We cannot recommend them (the company) enough. Rather than discussing all the reasons, can I suggest you try them? If you have, I believe you will come to the same conclusion we did. They have excellent prices, customer service as well a wide array of products.

Natural Flea and Tick Towelettes

IMG_1812Pet Naturals (of Vermont) makes the Flea +Tick 60 Pre-Moistened towelettes we are reviewing. Honestly, Cliff opened them and used them for the North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association Hunt Test (last weekend). Ticks are an issue along the rivers and lakes–reports are that they are a lot worse this year. He wiped down Winnie before she got out at the test site. Cliff said he loves the convenience as well as the fact that it is so pleasant smelling.

Christina has started to use them on the pups that are out in the yard. We sincerely hope they will help deter gnats. Some puppies end up with little gnat bites because their tummies are rubbing the lawn. We don’t use chemicals on our yards. These wipes repel fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and flies so it seems reasonable that they should work for gnats, too. Yes, they are safe for puppies and kittens. You do have to reapply every 2-3 days though. Nonetheless, being holistic and natural appeals to us when we are talking about our sensitive Weimaraner. Like anything, we suggest you try them on one area before jumping in wholeheartedly and discovering your Weimaraner is allergic–we don’t believe that should be an issue; however, caution is the smart approach.

What About

Worms

      ~and Other Parasites

3-Juniper X Boone 2018 Wk3-17This topic (of worms) is not one we like to discuss unless we are talking about putting the fishing worm on the hook–even then, to many it is a nauseating thought. Nonetheless, worms and parasites are opportunistic. They find ways to survive inside your pet as well as in extreme environmental conditions. Dog’s Naturally has posted some natural solutions that you might find helpful. Here is their article —click here to find out more.

Signs of Worms

Some worms cause more obvious symptoms than others. I’ve provided more specific symptom information below along with information about the different types of worms (See Types of Worms below) … but here are a few clues your dog may give you that could mean he has worms:

  • Intermittent or frequent diarrhea or vomiting can be signs your dog has worms.
  • Your dog may have a fever.
  • He may scoot and lick his rear (though scooting can mean other things too).
  • Your dog may be off his food or be a little lethargic; his coat may look dull.
  • You might see stools that are coated in mucus (but otherwise look normal).
  • Or you might see squiggly worms or “rice bodies” in his stool.

But some worms can’t be seen with the naked eye, so if your dog’s showing some of these signs, you might want to get a fecal sample analyzed by your vet.

Cliff and I suggest you keep your eye on the pooh–I know it doesn’t sound lovely, but getting a fecal check can help you avoid some of the more unpleasant scenarios. A loose stool doesn’t always mean there is something amiss, but when something like that happens, you want to keep watch. Of course, we love adding the pumpkin (or even banana squash). We are planting Banana Squash in our garden. Right now I only have two hills ready to plant. I would like more, but we have to see if we can make more room. Last year, I baked the banana squash and frozen it in chunks for easy serving. The Weims love it!

Pushkin

Roadtrip

     ~Coping with Excess Energy 

20180414_154025
Pushkin and I are preparing for a long road trip to Arizona to move my mother into an assisted living facility. Once that has been taken care of we are going on to the Chaco Canyons of New Mexico.  It is the oldest Anasazi site in the U.S. In preparation for the trip to Arizona, we took a trip from Salem to Kennewick to see my grandchildren.

What I learned on the drive was that we had to stop quite often, not because Push had to “potty” but because he needed exercise. Once he was out of the car and we walked for a bit he settled right down when we started up again. At every rest stop, someone would comment on what a beautiful dog he is. I have attached some pictures for you. The man is my son, the children are obviously my grandchildren. I am not sure who that white-haired old woman is, could it be me?😏

What a great dog he is!
Marie

Breeder Comment

Thanks for the great share–we are excited you’re traveling together. That is fun. We loved your pointer on burning off the excess energy. It is good for humans as well.
One suggestion we might have is to be careful about dusty areas you visit while in the Southwest. Valley Fever in dogs is a thing. We would not want anything to happen to the lovely Puskin. Click here to read a bit about this potential risk. 

In the News

Puppy Carryon

     ~ Common Sense Lacking

dog19n-3-web

Sen. Marisol Alcantara speaks to protesters demanding justice for Kokito outside LaGuardia Airport. To her right is one of the dog’s owners, 11-year-old Sophia Ceballos.
 (ANDREW SAVULICH/NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

Cliff and I have watched, listened, and been saddened by the recent news of the United Airlines craziness. Honestly, I have carried a puppy home on the airplane before. My ticket was with Delta; however, on one leg of the flight home, I was diverted to a United Flight. It was not necessarily a good experience. I received a less than welcome attitude and got a lecture about carryon protocol–it was a rather demeaning lecture. I bite my tongue because I needed to get home with the puppy.

Would I carry on again? Indeed I would. It is an excellent way to travel with a puppy. OwyheeStar has more clients than you can imagine who fly into Boise and bring their puppy home as their carryon. You might be shocked to hear us say it is much safer than a road trip. Avoiding exposure to the deadly Parvovirus is one of the reasons. Nevertheless, getting them home and off to a grand start with the least amount of stress (and risk) possible is essential.

What went wrong? United Airlines Flight Attendant told someone to put their dog in the overhead storage. How insane is that? Honestly, I would have gotten off the plane. I would have made a formal complaint. What is worse is this is a short-snouted dog. Anyone who has dealt with the airlines knows they ask about the breed and they have a specific protocol for these breeds who are prone to breathing issues. (OMG) This loss should not have happened–the owner has to protect the dog’s life always. You are responsible for the ultimate decisions whether you are at a Vet office, a dog park, or planning to fly with a puppy.

We are beyond saddened by this incident. The bulk of the blame is on the flight attendant. Whatever was she thinking? Nevertheless, we are the gatekeeper. You have to make sure your dog is safe. The carryon protocol has always been to use an appropriate airline approved bag which fits under the seat. We have put the bag under the seat for takeoff and landing. Otherwise, I held the bag on my lap–sometimes inserting my hand into the Sherpa Carrier. In twenty plus years of folks flying into to get the puppy as a carryon, there was one incident where the airline was being crazy. The person booked a flight home on another airline. The airline (not United) got a letter from this family who travels extensively with their dogs because they use them as therapy dogs.

Click here to read United Airlines response to this heartbreaking incident.

Two days later there was another mixup. This time due to a connecting flight error in Denver. Honestly, a large number of live animals fly without incident. Nonetheless, connecting flights increase the risk. The scenic route (via Japan) was a pretty significant mistake. Regardless, they were chartered to the new Kansas family awaiting their pet’s arrival. (OMG)

 

 

Talking About

The Longhair

        ~Part ThreeStackhouse-4964-2 11.08.45 AM

To sum up our previous two discussions in a few words is difficult. We talked about the DNA factor. How it requires both parents to carry the fluffy coat (Longhair) DNA marker to produce Longhair pups. We talked about how difficult it is to see the difference at birth and the DNA testing we do to ensure we have the pups labeled accurately. Finally, we discussed the feathering and showed you a decent photo of what you might expect. What else is there to talk about? Read on to hear what others say about the Longhair Weimaraner–sometimes called the other Weimaraner.

W.W. Denlinger (*)

        ~In Regards to the Longhair

The ideal hair length is between long and shorthair in the range of the original coarse. It should be smooth and thick with a water repellent undercoat, resistant to weather and thorns. At the same time, it should not be too sensitive to dirt and burrs.

The long-haired Weimaraner has been described as conforming to the Standard for the short-haired dog in every respect except for the length of coat. At birth, the coat of the SH Weimaraner is inclined to be rather crisp, with definite stripes which disappear within a short time.That of the LH Weimaraner is soft and wooly at birth, and has no stripes. The coat of the mature dog, no longer wooly, has a silky texture, and is straight or slightly wavy. On the upper part of the body, the coat is tighter than on the SH dog; on the lower part, it is not so tight. The outer sides of the ears are covered with long, soft, silky hair. The tail, which is not docked as is that of the SH Weimaraner, is heavily feathered so that in the field the dog appears to have a graceful plume-like flag.There is soft feathering on the backs of the legs, and between the toes

*As reported for the Weimaraner Club of America by Deborah Andrews
Weimaraner Club of America Liaison to the German Weimaraner Klub e.V.
http://www.weimclubamerica.org/worldweims/longhair/
Denlinger, W.,  The Complete Weimaraner, p. 183, retrieved from (http://www.weimclubamerica.org/worldweims/longhair/article06.html).

Talking About

The Longhair

     ~ Part One

Stackhouse_9693

Stackhouse, the infamous OwyheeStar Gray Longhair Stud Dog, was featured on yesterday’s blog. Many of our readers have gorgeous pups from a Stackhouse-sired litter. You might find it interesting to note that there are more smooth coats than longhairs. To get a litter in which the longhair pups present requires a Mama who carries the DNA marker for the fluffy-coat, too! Even when they do, unless they are also a Longhair (and not just a Carrier), only a portion of the litter will have the longer coat length.

The Affected and The Carrier

When mating the Affected (a Longhair such as Stackhouse) with a Weimaraner who is a Carrier (such as Dazee) statistically, we should be able to expect 50% of the pups to be Longhairs. Over the last decade plus, we have learned this is an average and not a guarantee. (Ha!) For example, we mated the same pair two years in a row. The first year we only had two longhairs in a litter of eight pups. The next year (with the same everything) we had six longhairs in a litter of eight. It is like everything Weimaraner; predictions are nearly impossible.

Two Carriers mated are said to result in a 25% longhair to smooth coat ratio. There are other factors, but as with the aforementioned (Longhair to Carrier) scenario, it is impossible to predict the outcome. On a couple of occasions, the Carrier to Carrier mating produced no longhairs-othertimes, the result was near the 50% ratio. It is difficult for everyone who is hoping for the Longhair arrival status.

Many folks covet the smooth coats out of such a mating. Their coats tend to be thicker and velvet-like. Waterfowl hunters like to find such a pup because the coat is not only a bit warmer but water resistant. Sure they still get wet, but there is a measure of protection.

The Hair Factor

There is no doubt that the Longhairs are a bit messier; however, it is nothing as you imagine. Unlike the more popular Labrador, the Longhair Weimaraner doesn’t deposit hair all over you and your belongings. It is hard to believe this as being true–especially if you are coming from a situation where you are vacuuming hair from a fur family member who has been gone for some time. It is good to keep them groomed, but even for those that go natural, it is shocking how little they shed.

Longhair Discussions

Stackhouse_9692This blog is the first in a short series discussing the Longhair Weimaraner. Some of you are adverse to the idea of the tendrils (or the feathering) and a fluffy tail. Others are intrigued, and still many of you have both a Longhair and a traditional smooth coat Weimaraner.

We might also mention that the Longhair coat varies widely–some are thick, but more often they are similar looking to the classic look with the feathering on the ears and legs. Oh and then there is the ever so slight additional fluff on the face that almost speaks to a teddy bear look.

The Longhair always sports the undocked tail (unless there was a mistaken assumption that they were a smooth coat). Expedited DNA Testing helps prevent such an error. The newborn pups (longhair and traditional) are nearly impossible to sort; therefore, to ensure accuracy, we do the DNA testing.