Category Archives: Information and Education

Baby Faces

~ Just Because We can

Breeder Comment

Once again, I am running short on blog material. I have at least one option to get worked up–but, short on content. I didn’t think you would mind having this puppy fix in lieu of me writing something. I hope that is the truth.

These are the Hattee X Boone Week One Update Photos. They were taken last Friday on day six. Of the four pups–there is only one gray. There is also one with the undocked tail. They appear to be thriving–there is a considerable size difference. There are two larger pups and two smaller pups. We will see how that turns out once we arrive at the exit–one never knows if they will catch up, or if this is something woven in the DNA–meaning they got the genes for a smaller size. Isn’t it interesting, though?

The View

~You Know What We Mean!

Stackhouse is beyond exhausted. The coming and going of the cousins and more recently our longtime friend Collin (along with his wife Lisa) had its ups and downs. He loved their attention–took them, but then they left. (Haha) Things are back to the boring norm—which is how we all need it to be, right?

Hydrotherapy

~Blue is not an OwyheeStar but–

Thought you might find this interesting. Blue is going to Hydrotherapy for his hind leg stiffness. It’s expensive and I was skeptical but it REALLY works!

Breeder Comment

You might remember Stone, who joined Victoria and her resident Weimaraner (Blue). Well, the aging has been tough on him. Being the excellent Weimaraner Mama, Victoria would do anything to prolong their time together–and to improve the quality of life.

Many Weimaraners like other large breed dogs, suffer stiffness and problems with mobility as they age. We have been asked before if there is anything that can be done? We do recommend the supplements as well as Duralactin–it does help, but here is something else that is promising. We wanted to share this so you would know this option exists.

Abi

~It is time to think about another OwyheeStar

At the Cabin– Abi’s happy place

My name is Karen. My husband and I live in La Grande with Abi. We got her from you in 2007. Even thought she is getting older, this girl still runs and plays. She is incredibly healthy. I think that is her birth year, time flies.

I got remarried 10 years ago and Abi has totally become my husband’s girl. Of course, it helps that he’s retired and with her all the time. My ex-husband and wife have their own weim and we babysit for each other whenever we’re away from home. So Abi is truly loved! 

Abi and helper at the cabin

We think it’s time to start thinking about a new puppy. Abi is my third Weimaraner and I’ve had success with “overlapping” them. The puppy is a good companion for the older dog, the older dog has so much to teach a young one. And it’s easier on our hearts, which will be broken when it comes time to say goodbye. 

We’d like a female. No hunting or showing. Just a loving part of our family. We have grandchildren, toddlers, so good with kids. And we only want a puppy from you because we want a dog as healthy and amazing  as our Abi. Would you consider us for one of your babies? No urgency. Just finally ready to admit that it’s getting time for another girl to join us.

Our girl loves to go to the cabin in Sumpter.  Her special skill is to cover herself up with a blanket. She pulls it up and tucks it around.  And when she’s left in the cabin or the house she will often grab a piece of our clothing or a shoe to sleep with. Not chew, just snuggle.  She is a counter surfer and garbage hound, have to keep things put up and away.  She also has a white mark in the center of her forehead that appeared a few years ago. We don’t remember an accident but it’s there, along with a couple of smaller ones.  

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Karen, for the update on Abi. We are happy to hear from you–and appreciate your kind words. Your loyalty is heartwarming. One never knows how long a puppy might live. Of course, we want every OwyheeStar pup to live long and to do well.

Nevertheless, life is not always kind to us. We cannot guarantee anything –other than to make the best possible decisions. To imagine what I mean, look a large family of children. They have the same parents and yet so many variations–and different types of issues. Perfect is not possible–that is a reality.

Bob and Cody Wolff

~ Little Tail Adventures

Together they have created some Weimaraner magic with the tales of their adventures.

Well, Bob Wolff graciously sent us a copy of his children’s books featuring his Weimaraner, Cody. I assure you that our granddaughter loved the book, but she was adlibbing because she doesn’t read yet. I want to give you a link to Bob’s books–you might never have heard about them. What could be better than a book that features a Weimaraner?

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Bob, for sharing your fabulous adventures with us. We hope some of our Weimaraner fans will want to snag a copy for their bookshelf, too!

Tikka

~Have You Heard of a Soft-Mouth?

Tikka and Luna

(8/15/2019) I have to tell you guys about Tikka today! We’re camping on a lake and we paddled out to an island, well Tikka obviously “found something ” she was super excited and kind of lounged then it looked like she tossed something but kept after what ever it was. I noticed a mama bird that was upset so I called her off. As we were leaving she ran back that way and started swimming away from us and wouldn’t come when called. When she finally came back it was obvious that she had something in her mouth (dang it a dead baby bird!) . She was swimming differently, slow and careful. She swam directly to me and gave me a live baby bird that I returned to it’s nest

😊Here are some photos from our recent adventure.

Breeder Comment

Supposedly, the Weimaraner is not naturally soft-mouthed. Small game and game birds frequently don’t fair well–but having said that, Cliff had had many a retrieved bird fly out of an OwyheeStar Weimaraner’s mouth. A soft-mouthed dog is a good thing.

Thank you, for sharing your story–and all these great photos. We know everyone loves seeing Tikka and Luna.

NAVHDA Natural Ability Prize One

~ Our Score 112

Hi guys just wanted to drop a quick note. Me and Luna were first alternate and luckily got into the NA test yesterday. 

We surprisingly got a prize 1 – 112 score! Wow. I’m still shocked but she did it all and we trained hard. Now just getting ready for hunting season. 

Mike and Michelle

Information

–The North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association (NAVHDA)

NAVHDA chapters sponsor four kinds of tests:

The Natural Ability Test is designed to evaluate the inherent natural abilities of young dogs and gain insight into their possible usefulness as versatile gun dogs. It rates seven important inherited abilities: nose, search, tracking, pointing, water, desire and cooperation. Dogs are eligible for a Natural Ability Test up until, and including, the day they reach 16 months of age. Dogs over 16 months may be run for evaluation only. Dogs over 16 months may only be run if space is available. No prize classification can be awarded the dog run for evaluation.

The Utility Preparatory Test measures the dogs’ development midway through their training toward the Utility Test. No previous testing required.The Utility Test evaluates trained dogs in water and field, before and after the shot, as finished versatile hunting companions as well as many other specific tasks. No previous testing required. The Invitational Test is our highest level of testing. Only those dogs that have achieved a Prize I in Utility are eligible. This limits the entry to exceptional animals who have demonstrated a high level of training and tests their skills in the advanced work.                 

Breeder Comment on Points Earned

The maximum possible score for a dog running in the NAVHDA Natural Ability Test is 112 Points. You must earn a minimum of 99 points to net a Prize One. Luna got a perfect score–we cannot tell you how difficult it is to achieve this goal. Honestly, it is even more remarkable with the Weimaraner–who can potential flake out at the wrong moment.

To Learn More about competing your Weimaraner with NAVHDA click here!

Double Trouble Bubbles

~That’s a crazy name, don’t you agree?

Well, here is a lovely older girl (OwyheeStar’s Double Trouble Bubbles) for which we could find the perfect Golden Year placement–but only if the right person comes along. Anyhow–we thought you might enjoy seeing her. She was a true homozygous blue Weimaraner–meaning she only produced blue pups.

Going On Vacation?

~Is the Weim Onboard?

Hey, Karen, are you forgetting something? –Like Me!

Separation anxiety is real and palpable –and the consequences are sometimes staggering. We have received notes from people who suffered the worst of outcomes–a loss. Others, and more frequently this is what happens, come home to destruction. The rock-solid trustworthy Weimaraner didn’t handle the absence as expected. Anyone who loves this breed has most likely seen reports outlining shocking Weimaraner behavior. We are positive that many of you have experienced this phenomenon firsthand. (Ouch)

Ideally, we need to help our Weimaraner learn how to adapt and adjust to change. For people new to this breed, this can be a foreign concept. Possibly they equate the Weimaraner separation to what they experienced with another breed–somehow, I highly doubt it. Maybe, but more than likely, this person is going to be caught short–shocked at what can happen. This separation anxiety thing is one of the reasons so many Weimaraner end up being rehomed. It is a sad reality. Nonetheless, many Weimar-addicts walk into the relationship eyes-open knowing about this trait and the other quirks and quandaries they might face.

Francee

~The Lava Ghost

Thought you might like this pic! She is the best camp and travel buddy!

Breeder Comment


Alissa and Seth, thank you for adopting Francee. This Golden-Year-Placement for her has proved excellent. We love knowing she is an integral part of your family and much-loved.

On occasion, we find the ideal placement for a retired OwyheeStar Mama. It is preferable to having them run the backlot with the gang. It makes our hearts happy to know they are being lavished with love. People contact us often asking if we have a retired female around two-years of age. Honestly, that would not be practical for us–we don’t mate them until they are about two-year-old. Before then, they are growing and developing, and they need all the nutrients for their own growth. We only mate them every year to year-and-a-half—so we don’t retire a female until they are about five-years-old or sometimes six. Nevertheless, some extraordinary folks are willing to adopt such a girl and incorporate them into their family. We thank everyone who has done this.