Category Archives: Weimaraner puppies

Elio

At 16 Weeks

Lorenzen's Elio June 23 2017Elio continues to be an absolute joy and an incredible addition to my little fur family! ¬†He’s a calm, well-mannered puppy who picks up on things incredibly fast! We’re going into week 3 of puppy classes and he’s doing great! ūüôā

Breeder Comment

Vaccine Crossroad

A Reminder to Proceed with Caution

The Sadie X Stackhouse Litter will celebrate their sixteen-week birthday on this coming Sunday (June 25th). That brings everyone to a crossroad. By now a lot has happened, and everyone will have found themselves insanely busy raising their Weimaraner. The Weimaraner’s¬†(and the OwyheeStar) Vaccine Protocol can have been forgotten.

Your Veterinary office will have a different (broad-based) vaccine protocol. Even if they agree to follow the recommendations, it will fall on the pup’s owner to remember these details. We suggest putting the dates on your calendar and ignoring the Veterinary office alerts. Otherwise, it gets very confusing. If you have forgotten the protocol read on1

 

  • 6-Week¬†NEOPAR¬ģ Puppy Shot(given at OwyheeStar)
  • 9-Week *Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • 12- Week¬†*Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • Other vaccines such as Lepto and Kennel Cough (Bordatella) should be given¬†as needed–and avoided when possible. We recommend not combining these shots with any other vaccine–, especially¬†rabies. Vaccine challenges the immune system to build antibodies; therefore, we strongly encourage you to space Lepto, Bordetella, and Rabies vaccination at least two weeks apart. We realize that many veterinary practices give multiple vaccinations at a single visit; however, this approach is easier on the immune system. If a reaction does occur, then you know what caused it and plan to avoid it in the future. Yes, we understand this is a more costly approach–avoiding the risk is worth it!
  • 16-Week Crossroad <== Opt for the Vaccine Titer Test instead of automatically getting another puppy shot.¬†Your Vet is going to recommend just doing the shot because that is typical for the all-breed approach; however, a percentage of Weims are vaccine sensitive. Although your pup probably never had a reaction before, please do not ignore this warning. Even a mild vaccine reaction can trigger immune system issues–some of these lead to on-going health problems and in certain instances death. It is not worth the risk! The vaccine titer test runs more than double the cost of the typical puppy shot, but it might save you thousands over time as well as the potential heartache. Almost without exception, our protocol has been producing immunity by week sixteen, which means your puppy doesn’t need any more essential vaccine. If you need the optional vaccines (Bordetella or Lepto) these can be done; however, please space them at least two weeks apart from the Rabies.
  • Vaccine Blog Post¬†¬†¬†For the OwyheeStar Client Only¬†click here! (requires password)

PUPPY VACCINE CLARIFICATION (Lepto)

There is a significant push by the Veterinary community (due to the recent rise of Lepto) to include Lepto in the puppy shot. The Weimaraner Club of America (as well as others who study this breed) recommend you wait to give the Lepto, etc. until the puppy shots are completed. The puppy shot should not include Lepto or Corona. No other vaccine should be combined with the puppy shot. Waiting for the Lepto, Bordetella, and another vaccine until the pup is a little older is less risky. It takes more effort and costs a bit more to space the vaccine, but is worth it.

What is the DAPPv?

Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1 (Hepatitis), Adenovirus Type 2 (Respiratory Disease), Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus (Click Here to read more about the vaccine we use. Remember the Puppy Shot should not contain the Lepto or Corona.

OwyheeStar Disclaimer

The Weimaraner Club of America (WCA) Vaccine Protocol

We are neither Licensed Veterinarians nor Licensed Veterinary Techs. Our recommendations are based on twenty-plus years breeding the Weimaraner (exclusively) as well as the breed recommendation (from the Weimaraner Club of America). Ultimately, you have to decide what is the best approach. This protocol is considered a more Holistic and safer approach. That being said, our advice cannot replace that of your Veterinary of choice. 

Swimming Pups

The First Swim

I posted this video on Facebook yesterday. I never gave it much thought, but it deserves an explanation. There are six puppies; four are Longhairs. Of the six, five have the natural European-style tail–full length. This tail length is typical around the world for the Longhairs–and it is the Breed Standard. You may have noticed that the one Blue Ghost puppy has a full-length tail too. It was by request.

B-Sadie X Stackhouse 2017 Week Five Adventure-4.jpgThe traditional undocked puppy requires advance notice. We have a very specific protocol for this situation. I will forego the details here, other than to say we require a larger deposit for the obvious reasons. The number of inquiries regarding the undocked tail continues to increase each year.

Introducing Something New

The pups had never seen more than their water dish. Cliff set them in the water as gentle as possible. They all swam. The Weimaraner has webbed toes, and it should be noted that they are often excellent swimmers. When introducing them to water, it is important to be sure they don’t get spooked. Cliff uses lots of patience when he is working an older pup or an adult into the water. Obviously, you cannot carry them out into the water and then set them gently as Cliff did with the pups.

It is important not to spook them. The best technique is to engrain the love of the retrieve from and early age. This obsession with the retrieve works in your favor to get them into the water. A pond with sloping sides is ideal. First, get them retrieving along the water’s edge. Gradually you will ease them out where they must go beyond the bottom. This process could take a couple of days or weeks. With patience, any Weimaraner can learn to swim.

Here is Stackhouse

     ~ another Longhair

Keep In Mind

All Weimaraners have the potential to take to the water. It takes a bit of knack and patience. Our puppy imprinting does guarantee success–nor does it hurt the process. The retrieving and water-work sometimes get cast to the side during the flurry of early adjustment. There are so many things pulling at the process it is easy to forget a few. Socialization (a lot of touches in a safe way), exposure to noise, ingraining the love of the retrieve (not playing keep away) as well as engaging the pup with water are equally important. Balancing everything you are trying to accomplish–the basics we keep talking about and a lot more while doing it in the right manner is not a small task. It is important to spook them and create a fear of people, places, or situations. Some pups are more sensitive to stimuli, and others let it roll off their back. Approach the process with caution staying optimistic and upbeat. Small steps to success will get you results. Preconceived ideas should be shelved. See what you can become together.

Litter Socialization

Interaction Counts

     ~ Human and with Littermates

Evie and River-Sadie X Stackhouse 2017 Week Five Adventure-13The raising puppies and litter socialization has seen a lot of ink. There are different philosophies. Some variances are due to a particular breed. Personal preference, and in some cases scientific evidence define the protocol. It was once commonplace to pick up a puppy at five or six weeks of age. We now this is not in a pups best interest.

B-Sadie X Stackhouse 2017 Week Five Adventure-4Important things are happening within the litter from day one; however, from day thirty-five to the departure (around eight weeks of age) the litter hierarchy and interaction is vital to development. These lessons impact the Weimaraner’s future. It doesn’t mean that raising the Weim pup will be easy; nevertheless, these lessons cannot be short-changed. They are the foundation for socialization and the maturing process. Litter interaction is not the end of the socialization process. The first three years of their life (and especially the first eighteen months) require a concerted effort. Regardless, what seems like play is invaluable.

Considerations

A breeder has to manage the socialization and at the same time balance it with risk. Parvo being tracking onto the property would be a tragedy. Shoes must be sanitized, and access has to be limited. A constant stream of visitors would not be a healthy situation. Nevertheless, it is important to take advantage of the perfect opportunity. We believe it is important to have a child touch or handle a pup somewhere along the way as well as to have both female and males in the loop. The pups gain a lot of the experience, and their senses pick up on the different types of handling as well as the scents. Evie and River-Sadie X Stackhouse 2017 Week Five Adventure-6

Ongoing Socialization 

Exposing the pups to various experiences is also important. Not every litter can have the same exact experience. Summer pups are not going to experience snow. They should experience water–we like to swim the pups when possible.

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Jan Magnuson’s SunStar All Breed Training Graduation

 

Once they join their forever family, the process continues. Some recommend one hundred touches in a hundred days. This process has to be carefully managed too. Limiting risk (exposure to the Parvo virus as well as other dangers–aggressive dogs and some scary humans) is vital. Knowing how to react when something goes awry is equally important. Pups need to learn to love to meet people and other dogs. Each experience should be a building block. They also need to acquire skills that make them good citizens. Socialization takes place whether you guide it in the right direction or not. We want the best possible outcome–this is going to require you being an excellent handler/leader and getting involved in a positive classroom setting.

Progress

Baby Steps

cranes-lucy-2Lucy is doing very well. She knows how to sit and wait for her food (most of the time). She gets to go for short walks in the woods every day with Max and absolutely LOVES antlers and bully sticks to chew on.
Her stools are normal (I think maybe the soft ones were from stress for the first few days) and she eats calmly and often will walk away and come back to finish. We’re so glad she doesn’t “hoarf” it down!!
cranes-lucy-3Best of all is that she’s ringing the “potty bell” at the door and Max is pretty okay with her! 80)
Lovin every minute of it!
Melissa and Jeff (02/22/2017)
How wonderful is it that nobody need wait a single moment to improve the world. ~Anne Frank
PS: We have been watching the recent posts. We LOVED seeing the blog and responses from Lucy’s siblings’ new families!

Our Winnie

Shela and Cliff,

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I can’t remember what life was like before Winnie. Today marks her 2nd birthday and it feels like she has been with me longer than 2 years.

Some of Winnie’s favorite things to do are: sleeping (she will sleep all night with Brendan and then sleep all day with me, when I come home from working night shift), she’s a great copilot while going for rides wherever that may be (she is not fond of staying at home), she loves to hunt and gets better each time we take her out, and playing with her friends.

Some of Winnie’s quirky habits are: running to the fridge whenever she hears anyone getting ice (just so she can have some too), spinning like a tornado when it’s time to eat or get treats (one of her nicknames is spinnie Winnie), rolling on her back in the middle of the floor to get belly rubs, and people watching in the front yard.
Thank you for such an amazing companion.

The Look

The Weimaraner Knows

           ~my eyes are on you!

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The Velcro-nature of the Weimaraner is no secret. Are you going somewhere? You best be taking me along or I am going to eat this place. “Woof!”

Separation Anxiety

         ~Its a Thing

Set an early goal to teach your Weimaraner how to stay alone. No one can say they will never have to be away from their beloved Weimaraner–the retired or those that work from home included. There is nothing harder than leaving the beloved new family addition. The dream and excitement of bringing your baby home all too often are what paves the way for well-meaning poor decisions. People align their whole schedule for the event–and so should they. Nevertheless, part of this needs to include finding a way to prepare them for when you are gone. Taking two weeks off from work to help the puppy adapt (and to feed your soul with puppy breath moments) is wonderful in theory. It can be a great experience; however, there is a question (or two) you need to ask yourself. Am I setting my new family member up to feel abandoned? Does my plan help them learn that they will be left alone but I am always going return? Is there another safe place and family that they will call their second home?

Preparing Them

Everyone’s lifestyle is different. It is more challenging to accomplish such a thing when you are home 24 X 7–the retired person, the person who works from home, or the stay at home parent. Through the Weimar pup’s eyes, they believe their initial two-week period to be their new lifestyle norm. You have replaced their litter. You are their everything. This feeling is both euphoric and at the same time presents unexpected challenges. Just balance the need to be everything to the new pup with the understanding you need to prepare them for anything. That is part of being an excellent Weimaraner parent. The unforeseen car accident, illness, or surgery means you need a plan. No one is immune. You Weimaraner needs to see the alternative living situation as something other than just being left behind. If not, things can go sideways just when you need stability–not something anyone wants to face.

 When we Create Extreme Dependency

All too often, the human element unwittingly sets the stage to create, even more, dependency. It happens when we employ our well-meaning doting type of behavior thinking. In our concerted effort to do what is best; we all too often create problems best avoided. The already prone to separation anxiety Weimaraner (when left behind) easily slips into a habitual acting out behaviors due to feeling abandoned. This goal of them feeling safe in your absence can only be achieved when they learn how to stay alone. There are several ways to reach this aim. Your plan needs to start early and be realistic for you and your lifestyle. Never forget freedom is earned–and each twist and turn is a new challenge that requires monitoring until the positive outcome is rock solid. Therefore, just leaving them in the yard can be a quick undoing of their previous excellent outdoor behavior. People typically find the crate training is vital to their success. Others employ the use of an alternative family or some other setting where the Weimaraner can learn to feel safe. You will return. The time to learn this skill is before it is needed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OwyheeStar’s Gabriel

Congratulations!

~ The Russian First Blue Weimaraner

   International Show Champion Title

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Here are some photos of Gabriel taken in Russia–some when she was younger and the others are recent outdoor snapshots.

Breeder Comment

Gabriel’s owner sent a courier to bring her to Russia. We get quite a few International requests, but very few receive much consideration. There is a myriad of reasons we don’t seek these type of arrangements.

It is a lot of work to prepare for the International Transport of a pup. There are legal requirements that have to be met.
We will not export where the pup is traveling to a location that requires quarantine.
There are a lot of things that could go sideways; they are across the ocean from us.

  1. A health issue could arise–no one can guarantee a living creature will not develop one. Of course, it is our goal, but after so many years, we know it is impossible.
  2. The prized Weimaraner might not produce offspring.
  3. Anything could happen when this DNA pool is joined with their current DNA pool.
  4. The distance for the pup to travel and the obstacles are many. Even with a courier they arrive disillusioned and stressed.
  5. We live near Boise, ID–the west coast is a long way from most locations. Being near Boise complicates things. There are fewer direct flights, out of Boise. That means additional plane changes are required to get anywhere.
  6. The paperwork we acquired for the International flight is time sensitive. If anything stalled, it might have to be replaced.
  7. The cost is considerable. The workload for Cliff is an added burden.

We are very selective about to whom we share International breeding rights with for the above reasons plus others. We have limited time and resources. We are not Show Breeders. Igor wanted to bring the first Blue Weimaraner to Russia. That meant whatever happened it was going to draw attention. Dog politics are a thing. Over time, this has proven out well for Igor and those who have gotten Gabriel’s offspring; however, imagine if she would have failed to produce a litter? What if, she didn’t work out with his existing Stud Dog? Worse yet, if she failed to make a good showing, it would have been a lot of time and effort (and well as a huge chunk of change spent) for nothing. It is risky. We didn’t charge Igor more for Gabriel (even if we probably should have), but he had to pay all the expenses associated with getting ready to leave. They were substantial. He had to hire a courier because we would not ship using an International Broker Service. There are so many ways this could have gone badly, but it didn’t Gabriel (Livee X Blue) has made us proud. Thank you, Igor, for being a person of your word and doing great things with this Blue girl. We know it was not an easy task. It gets more complicated when you add the travel and the distance.¬†owyheestars-gabriel-5

Puppy Breath

A Cabin Fever Fix

We know it is true. Addictions happen. Some are healthier than others, but we occasionally need a fix. Those afflicted with Weimarism know of what I speak. (Yes, I made up that word.)

It seems fitting that we set our eye on some photos to feed the soul. Today, from the OwyheeStar archives we selected a few very young puppy photos for your enjoyment.

Remember, these are from our archives and have long since joined their forever families.

OwyheeStar Week Forty-Seven 2016

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

hattees-two-girls-10Thanksgiving is around the corner. Christmas decor is for sale nearly every place you shop. Winter weather has knocked on the door promising to come sooner than many of us desire. Farmers are busy getting the fall field work completed. We are sure most of them are looking forward to a winter break. 

Hattee’s¬†predominantly¬†Longhair¬†Litter has been the focus. There were nine pups; seven were Longhair. A lot goes on behind the scene with the pups we raise. Christina has been extremely busy–she not only socializes them but keeps a sharp eye on them for any little issue that might arise. We are truly blessed to have her helping us.

This Week on the Blog

Here are the week‚Äôs posts if you wish you may review or visit them today! Cliff spoke¬†with Joyce at AKC Reunite yesterday; she had seen Wednesday’s blog and¬†had him on her list to call. These folks are extremely helpful and on top of things. If your puppy has the AKC Reunite Microchip (which all we use at OwyheeStar) you can phone AKC Reunite and they will help you, problem solve. Did I say that they are very helpful?

Sunday‚ÄĒ November 13 ‚ÄĒ¬†A Certificate Earned

Monday ‚ÄĒ November 14 ‚ÄĒ¬†All Muscle

Tuesday ‚ÄĒ November 15 ‚ÄĒ¬†Self Talk

Wednesday ‚ÄĒ November 16 ‚ÄĒ¬†AKC Reunite

Thursday¬† ‚ÄĒ November 17 ‚ÄĒ¬†Bath Time Woes

Friday¬† ‚ÄĒ November 18 ‚ÄĒ¬†Left Behind

On a very personal note

Cliff is always working on his outside projects. He got his water issues and electrical stuff working. Being the great guy he is he managed to get me a few solutions in my make-shift kitchen. I truly appreciate it too!

no-drawers_3742The lower cabinets are not completed, nor the countertops, backsplash, etc. We have been creative to get by. We had an extra good sized storage cabinet (no photo here) that is nearly floor to ceiling tall. It had two drawers–hurrah! I do love¬†drawers and pullouts, who doesn’t? Now I have two drawers for the silverware and serving utensils. We were far more creative with finding other drawers. Cliff has plans for this when I no longer need it.

no-door_3744Our son built the cabinet boxes. They need fronts, doors, shelving, or in some cases drawers. We have installed some shelves and made better use of the space. We are slowly getting this kind of thing done. It was never our plan to be fancy. We wanted the practical, conservative and functional remodeled farm house. I appreciate these small changes more than you can imagine. It makes my life easier.

Thanks to You

There is no way we could ever thank you enough for your love and support. We are immensely grateful for those who continually provide us with the material for the blog. Unfortunately, sometimes this is only photos and no script. We can fill in a bit when necessary; however, we like to keep the integrity of your writing real. A couple of sentences can go a long way‚Äďsometimes it is enough. Those that have sent us updates know we are more than likely to post it word-for-word.¬†

There is no end in sight of our farmhouse remodel. We are doing it ourselves, and it is the installment plan‚Äďwe are not borrowing to do this. We buy something and install it. Therefore, having the updates¬†is greatly appreciated than usual‚Äďit is always a blessing!

Remember Us

The Sentiment Taken to HeartArliss

Shela, it is ____(fill in the blank). ¬†It has been so long since I updated you as to this beautiful and fantastic dog (your pet’s name here). ¬†He was born ____. ¬†You bred him perfectly. ¬†

I wanted to thank you, and impress upon you and Cliff to please keep us in mind down the road.  Your genuine care and expertise certainly blessed us with an incredible dog.

The above excerpt extracted from a recent note is commonplace to our email. In a future blog, we will be using the expanded note for a blog. Nonetheless, we wanted to make use of the sentiment for today’s blog. We get a lot of emails¬†that say something similar. We even get inquiries from people we have never met that ask us to keep them in mind. (Whew) Even though the comments warm our heart, we cannot keep track of all the people that write to us hoping we will just think of them.

We could easily have several hundred persons on the Wait List at any one time. The reason we do not is the change we implemented about 15 years ago. We require a small (non-refundable) deposit to get on our Wait List. Before then, we often ran with a hundred plus names on the list and worked our way through the list each time pups arrived. Many on the list never replied. Others never spoke to us again once we asked for a deposit. This deposit requirement changed things for us. It meant we could spend our time on what is most important–the puppies and those who are committed to getting a pup from us. We also have a small personal life. (Haha).

A lot of folks make a comment about us asking them to complete the application. The application is how we gather all the information to determine if we are the right breeder and if we would be interested in placing a pup with you. It also is a systematic way to gather the much-needed information for our process–your contact information, who lives in your home, and what expectations you have for your relationship to the Weimaraner. At the same time, we spend a considerable amount of time and effort sharing pointers and tidbits of information that help ensure the puppy placement’s success.

A goodly portion of our Wait List comes from referrals as well as repeat business. Even then, a fresh application is of vital importance. We still require a small deposit to get on the Wait List as well as the puppy deposit. To the OwyheeStar savvy person, this seems reasonable and is to be expected. For those who has never experienced this type of process, it might seem a bit crazy. Regardless, it works.

5 Blue Males-Zula Blue X Blue 2016 Week 5-26We cannot thank our puppy families enough for their trust and loyalty. If you are new to the process, it is important to understand that this works the same for everyone. Secondly, it is not only in the best interest of the puppy but you. 4-lh-boys-hattee-x-stackhouse-3wk-a