Category Archives: Health and Wellness

Henri’s

~Titer Test @ 16 Weeks

Lounging at the Idaho Veterinary Hospital


Dear Weimlovers!

You might remember that Dr. John Calhoun’s Idaho Veterinary Hospital (IVH) agreed to start offering the VacciCheck Titer Testing. OwyheeStar’s Henri was the first to be tested using this system–and the fabulous Rebecca A Balls (Certified Veterinary Technician) handled all the laboratory details. We cannot thank IVH and their competent staff for their professionalism and making this possible.

The results are returned a little different than with the traditional titer test–but by all reports it is reliable. Henri’s results showed her having protective antibodies sufficient enough to provide immunity to

CDV — Canine Distemper Virus

ICH — Infectious Canine Hepatitis–Adenovirus

CPV — Canine Parvo Virus

This less expensive titer test is relatively new so most Veterinary practices may not yet offer this option. Please click here to read about the titer test, and ask your Vet if they can make this available to you–it is affordable, accurate, and helps you avoid vaccine reactions that are common in our breed.

We Are Busy

~ Ace of Clubs

Ace busy pruning my wisteria this morning 😬

Vaccine

The vet has agreed to administer the vaccines according to the Weimaraner protocol. He was prescribed an antibiotic for his eyes. We are hoping that his umbilical hernia will close by itself. I think it already looks smaller. His weight was 15 and 1/2 lbs. It seemed to me that he weighed a little more when we got him but he is eating, sleeping, playing and getting longer legs!! He is a beauty❣️
Dee and Mike

Diarrhea, Etc.

~ Not what I thought (whew)!

I just wanted to let you know that all is going very well despite a young puppy’s voracious appetite and sharp teeth!!I believe we are off to a solid start. We have completed the AKC registration and the registration for the microchip. We have adjusted the feedings to 1 cup 3x a day. Unfortunately Ace thinks he needs more. Lot’s more!!You know what happens to a dog when you cross that line. Yep! Diarrhea!! We tried listening to him and that’s what we got 🙃

Just set your mind at rest, I turned in a stool sample on Saturday and it was negative 😊

He is sitting and knows his name. Mostly responds to “Ace come” when called. A terrific pottier outside 👍🏻We are monitoring the umbilical hernia but are not concerned. His eye infections are cleared up but he has to finish 3 more days of the antibiotic.I hope all the rest of his litter mates are doing well❣️🐾🐾🐾🐾🐾🐾🐾🐾
Dee and Mike and Atkins Ace of Clubs

Breeder Comment

Thanks for the detailed updates –we are thrilled to hear that Ace is doing well. Yes, the last minute little hernia appears to be nothing of significance. I am glad you are not worried. Over the years, we have learned that doing as little as possible with these seems to be the best choice–only fix a larger one that is more risky.

We are glad you had the stool sample checked. With young pups it is always wise to check to be sure nothing more is going on–but you have this covered. It appears other folks are doing well–at least that is what we have heard.

Things Like This

~Injuries

Maybe you frequent Facebook and follow Luna, Tikka, and Maizie Weim. I know quite of few of you are connected via social media. Anyhow, not all that long ago–in mid-January Lunna tweaked a toe. I believe that is correct. So, we saw the photos of the various casts, etc.

Nancy reported –She broke one of her weight-bearing toes, not sure how…

Then news of Maize’s injury surfaced. (OMG)

Linda Writes –Yesterday at the Mary S. Young Dog Park, Maizie chased a ball—at high speed, thrown by the powerful toss of her Master with a Chuck-it. Coming after the ball too, was a large Labrador. They collided and Maizie got t-boned which broke her rib.😰. She is not feeling perky today. Gotta keep her quiet for a couple weeks. 🚫NO Squirrels.

Breeder Comment

We were sorry to hear about these injuries. The athletic Weimaraner sometimes finds trouble–even when they are being well-behaved.

Parvo Paranoia

~ Real or Imagined

Our Client Asked —

Luna not too long before she joined her family.

Is the Parvo virus threat just until they get through their 16 week Titler test? Or is it until they reach a certain age? Just a little unclear what constitutes them being safe for public areas/dog parks etc. If you get the titer test done at 16 weeks it will show if she has immunity to Parvo and if you also have her tested for the Distemper it would also show that. Last time we just tested for the Parvo because Distemper just is not something they are seeing in our area. 

OwyheeStar’s Response

Parvo is a very real risk. Ask any Vet office and they will tell you that the risk is out there, and it is beyond sad when a puppy comes in and they are determined infected. We have never had an OwyheeStar puppy diagnosed with Parvo. Nonetheless, even though nowhere in the Pacific NW is listed as a ‘Hot Spot’ we still need to exercise caution.

I think if you take your puppy for a walk in the neighborhood you should wipe the feet (not let them lick her paws) and make sure they are not investigating a lot of areas where the ground might be infected. In all likelihood, your local neighborhood (if it is a low traffic area) may be fairly safe.

So what do I mean by low traffic? A place less traveled by those with pups. Any area where people are taking random puppies (which might be unknowingly infected). It is understandable that the owner doesn’t yet have a clue. The pups begin shedding the virus long before there is a definitive sign that they are ill. So they are leaving behind the virus everywhere. Of course, they are infecting the ground. But did you know if you viewed this virus under the microscope that one end is barbed–it sticks to clothing, shoes, etc. It is very portable which makes the spread even more commonplace.

More Information

Here are a couple of links that talk about the prevalence of Parvo and how to avoid it—and while it sounds paranoid, you want to socialize the puppy BUT avoid risk.  

Parvo In Puppies

Parvo Virus in Dogs

Precautions

~We are extra careful

We always leave the pups in the car (when scheduled for the Veterinary Wellness) until the room is ready at the Vet office. It is essential to avoid exposure—to Parvo, Kennel Cough, etc. We never take a young dog that doesn’t have immunity to public places including pet stores (where well-meaning folks might share the virus) such a  Pet Store, Park, Dog Area, or even to socialize at the local Farm Store– etc.

The Vaccine Titer Test

Once the Titer test shows immunity (with a high titer count) you are good to go. We honestly believe if you follow our vaccine protocol you will attain protection. Then by getting the sixteen-week titer test (instead of the typical puppy shot) it is going to allow you to have the freedom to be anywhere. In the meantime though, visit friends homes in a fenced back yard—where pets are vaccinated, etc. Figure out ways to safely socialize your puppy–a hundred different touches in a hundred days would be a good goal. Do what you can–but be safe, my friend.

Every Breath You Take

~ Sounds Like

I often wonder how we do it. You know–raise a puppy. We bring the little bundle home and hover over them. It is essential to do the hovering thing–otherwise, how can you accomplish the housebreaking, etc.? But this obsession with our new fur baby runs deep–some of this never goes away.

Their every sound–a rattling, a snore, a hacking sound is cause for alarm. We watch breath-abated wondering if we need to run to the Vet. Ah–it is hard to know sometimes. We always suggest you wait and watch a bit–possibly take their temperature. Remember that a pet’s temperature is much higher than ours–typically around 101 degrees. Anything above 104 degrees is emergent. Of course, if you were monitoring their temperature and it was 102 degrees and then within an hour 103 degrees, there might be cause for alarm. Always err on the side of caution–but rushing to the Vet for everything is probably not necessary. In fact, your alarm will be internalized by the puppy increasing the stress-factor. Try to stay calm.

A lot–and I do mean a lot, of our concerns, are for nothing. Puppies can cough, they snort, the sneeze, they can reverse sneeze (something we recently learned), they choke, and create a myriad of noises. Many of which are concerning. Most of which are in the end nothing at all. Thank goodness.

Keep your eye on them. A pup can ingest something in quick order–so despite saying not to overreact, there is vigilance. Recently, Henri went under my recliner and came out with a packet –that must have been attached underneath the chair. We didn’t realize it was there, but Henri found two–probably toxic packets. Oh my gosh–it is good we heard the crackling sound and asked what she had. We retrieved each package and tossed them in the trash. Thankfully they were not broken open.

Expert Advice

~ We Do What we are able

Breeder Comment

Cliff and I get a lot of Email inquiries–most are from folks hoping we have a puppy that can make their dream come true. Others are from folks like Dale–seeking advice and making commentary on our blog. We cannot always offer the level of advice some need or expect. Recommendations are hard to give when we are not in the loop and time is limited; however, we do what we are able to do. In this situation, we shared the food we have used and some information about the Weimaraner and heart issues. We have not seen many cases –so relax. Nevertheless, there are plenty of things that can go wrong when it comes to health. We always recommend being as Holistic in your approach as possible. I have posted Dale’s note (with his permission)–maybe some of you can identify with Dale. We all can agree that the loss of our beloved Weimaraner is something inexplicable. There are no words to adequately describe our relationship and the hole they leave behind. It is best to focus on what they brought to our life–to count every day allotted a blessing.

From Dale

Hello Shela,  Your Owyheestar blog is the first email I open EVERY day.   And re-read.   And forward to friends and family.  I know it’s a lot of work keeping up with the blog, but know that you do a great job, and all these Weimaraner pix and stories warm a lot of hearts.    Although we adopted Duke, our Weim, at 1, we did not get him from you.  Though we will next time.  But this question is important to you and all your Weim lovers.   I stumbled upon your website a few months after we lost our beloved Weimaraner, Duke (below) at age 10.   He was a bullet running, swimming, hiking, playing until two weeks before he died of asymptomatic congestive heart failure and cardiomyopathy.   It’s been almost 8 months and I still can’t believe he’s gone.   Such a personality. I’d like to discuss your food recommendations.  I purchased what I researched as the best foods, mixing up flavors every month.   The brands were Origen, Acana and Zignature.  Mainly Acana.   They all had high protein levels (28%), and lots of fresh fruits and vegetables.   No grain.  He received 5 cups of food a day, mostly chicken, beef and fish, until shortly before he died.  One month after Duke died, research came out from Joshua Stern, UC Davis, that certain foods that were high in legumes, were linked to heart disease in several breeds that lack a genetic history of the ailment.  (Canine diluted cardiomyopathy CDM)  Apparently these expensive boutique foods had a taurine deficiency.  Meats have plenty of taurine, but legumes do not.   So the red flag is legumes listed in the first six ingredients of the food.   Also, chicken and beef are high in taurine, while many exotic meats such as lamb, rabbit and others, and legumes have little or none.  Research is ongoing, and I know that CDM happens in these big-hearted dogs like Weims, pointers, etc.  I don’t know if the food caused or contributed to Duke’s premature death, but given his excellent health, it is a possibility.   But have you heard anything?   And what foods do you recommend? Also, we’re wondering about getting another Weim at our age.   I’m 66, my husband is 68, and we’re not sure we can keep up and do justice to another Weim.   Any thoughts on this?  Thank you for all you do, Dale

Grace & Bella Rae

              “Shela and Cliff — I made it to New Hampshire”

After a flight recovery day(flight went smooth and easy, no issues) everyone tired but now settling into day to day….Grace and Bella Rae are totally bonded❤️

Breeder Comment

You might remember that yesterday’s blog featured Roger and CW–they flew to Salt Lake City. Yes, we get quite a few folks that fly with their Weimaraner puppy. Nonetheless, it is getting more difficult to make these kinds of flights happen. Smaller planes and different carry-on criteria are the reason it is not as easy as it once was. Nonetheless, here are two families who were able to pull it off.

Why fly, you might ask. Well–in many cases, it is the best option. A road trip is not always in the best interest of the puppy. Nor, is it in many cases the best way to start–get the routine going to ensure you are on the right track. The road trip means you have the concern of where to potty your puppy–it is essential to be extremely careful. Parvo has most likely infected every roadside potty area–read up on this dreadful situation, and you will agree. Being very careful is essential. Every year, more pups are lost to this disease than you can imagine. I hold my breath as I write we have never lost an OwyheeStar to Parvo. We want to keep this way.

Another perk with the carry-on experience might not be as evident. People who fly must get their puppy to settle in the travel bag. If you can teach a puppy to settle–you can teach them anything. It is also a great time to bond. There is something about the travel experience of this sort–it sets you up for an extraordinary transition.

Mesquite

An Adventure

~Ends Badly

We were walking Mesquite Monday morning, she was in some tall grass when she let out a war whoop. I thought she had stepped on something sharp, when got over to her she had a big gash in her tummy just ahead of the right rear leg.

We took her to the vet and it took 15 stitches to close her back up.

Someone had broken off an old steel fence post about 8 inches above the ground.

She is on pain meds and antibiotics.

We were darn lucky, because it didn’t bleed much, and we were a mile from the house. I have keeping her in the house. 

I sure hope she comes out okay?

Here is our Mesquite protecting her injury. She hates that tee shirt.

Breeder Comment

We are sad to her that Mesquite has a serious accident. At the same, we are relieved that it was not life-threatening. Thank you, for being quick to get her the care she needed. We will all say a prayer for her speedy and complete recovery.

A Penchant for Paper!

      ~Naughty Maizie, Or Not!

No Paper on My Lips or Anywhere

You wouldn’t believe that this little beauty, MAIZIE, age 6.5, has a penchant for paper!  

You can file this in a chapter of “Weim Crimes!”  Yesterday, we left the house for an hour.  Maizie stayed home.  Usually always on our return home, she happily greets us—smiling, chattering, nibbling, wiggling with glee.  Yesterday she did not greet us.  Uh oh.   (She doesn’t greet us if she’s been naughty).   I found her laying in her living room sofa bed—ears back and shivering!  Uh oh.  Major telltale guilt!  We did a search of the house to find the “evidence” and came up with nothing!  We assumed then that she was just “thinking” about doing something naughty—reason for her guilty behavior.  That was, UNTIL…..
…..I went to make dinner!  Before we left home, I had printed a new recipe, Martha Stewart’s “Bacon-Mushroom-Leek Galette.”  It printed out on 3 pages.  I had left it on the dining room table.  It was nowhere to be found!  
BUSTED!  She didn’t leave a trace!  I had to reprint it to make dinner!  This is why we close our office door when we leave the house, can’t leave mail on the table, or leave a package in sight!  This girl’s got a penchant for paper!
Linda ❤️🐾

Breeder Comment

We cannot believe how smart this girl is, and as I replied–this is not her first paper raid you told us about. Old habits die hard. I guess the good news is it is paper—just so she doesn’t take to eating cash or important documents. (OMG)

Pie Anyone?

Maybe you noticed Nancy’s post regarding Luna and Tikka’s clever pie snatching –or maybe I should say sampling trick. It is too good to not borrow, so I asked Nancy for her permission. (Haha) It seemed like a good Sunday post.

Nancy writes, “When I got back in my truck and checked the pie (that I had hidden under the blanket) “Oh good, the lid’s still on!” “Good girls!” … Upon closer examination, I realize that they weren’t good girls, just clever girls for somehow getting the lid back in place!”

What To Do?

Upsampled Pie Squares, of course!

“Here’s what you do with pumpkin pie that the Weims have sampled.”

😊

Breeder Comment

Well, Nancy, this is perfect example of so many things Weimar related.

  1. How the Weimaraner can find a way, to get their way.
  2. How on the surface things look okay until you find it is not.
  3. How the experienced Weim-person figures a way to make something positive out of what is left. (Haha)

I seriously expect that Tikka and Luna had the  pie leftovers. So things worked out for them. I think it is amazing they didn’t eat the whole pie. 

Tikka says it was mostly Luna–look she has the horn to prove it.