Category Archives: Veterinary Topics

Cyclamen

It’s On The List

IMG_3128Yes, I own the Cyclamen that my friend Ellen gave me in June of 2012 when I had major surgery–one of two during the last few years. I love this plant, but I thought since I keep mentioning it I also should say it is toxic to dogs.

Cyclamen (Sowbread) | Scientific Names: Cyclamen spp | Family: Primulaceae

Before we moved into the Farmhouse, I kept the cyclamen in a big bay window not easily accessed by the Weimaraner. Sure if they jumped up on the counter and walked behind my kitchen sink they could have gotten to it. Here I have no such place, so it resides on our kitchen table. If I thought it was going to be a problem, I would need to make a hanger for it and get it up away from their reach. The Cyclamen is one of many plants toxic to the Weimaraner. We often forget the danger.

Click Here to check out the ASPCA’s Toxic and Non-Toxic Plant List

Find out if your houseplants are toxic and if so, take the necessary precautions. Also remember that a lot of common flowers, shrubs, and garden plants are also toxic. I love the above link because it also lists the Non-toxic plants. For example, the African Violet is an excellent choice.

African Violet (Cape Marigold) | Scientific Names: Saintpaulia spp. | Family: Gesneriaceae

Possibly the best way to select a new houseplant is to choose from the Non-toxic plant list. No one wants to see their beloved Weimaraner sick from eating a toxic plant.

Maize Speaks!

Hi!  I am Maizie.  I am 5 years old.  Recently I had an “owie” that had to be surgically removed.  My roommates Jerry and Linda tried putting various contraptions over my head to try to keep me from licking it.  I thought I would tell you about these.
Maizie Summer 2017-3
I borrowed this blow-up donut collar from a dog named Bentley.  It worked for him.  I didn’t mind it because I could still lick my wound when my roommates weren’t looking.  Eventually, I got busted.  That led to the return of the dreaded E-Collar i.e. The Collar of Shame.
Maizie Summer 2017-4
It made me depressed.  Jerry and Linda didn’t like seeing me like this.  Here is a look at how sad I was.
My roommates called around to pet stores and found me this really great one that allowed me to breathe, eat, drink, and for the most part—made it very difficult to get in trouble with licking.  It is new on the market, called Scratch.No.Mor.  It is like a giant turtleneck that is held together by velcro straps.  They take it off of me for meals.  They found it at Natures Pet Market in West Linn, OR.  Check it out:
I am all better now.  My stitches are healed.  I don’t care about licking it anymore.  I am back to chasing squirrels in my backyard.

Breeder Comment

 

Thank you, Maizie, for sharing that story and information with us! You rock!

Safe 4th Of July

graphics-fireworks-399589Happy Birthday, America!

 

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As birthday celebrations go, American’s Independence Day is spectacular. It tends to begin early and drag on for days afterward. This scenario is to many a person and their pet’s chagrin. Even the rock-solid gun dog may well shake and quiver at the barrage of blasts coming from seemingly ever direction. It is no secret that every year shelters are filled to overflowing, and workers are scrambling to reunite pets with their families. We trust everyone has their pet’s microchip on file with AKC Reunite–this can get them back to you quickly should the unthinkable happen.

Separation is not the only untoward situation stemming from this holiday. Fireworks poisoning is a thing–click here to get the details. If it isn’t enough that so many pets are traumatized by the blasts, there are other ways to get into trouble. We don’t want to think about those things on a day like to today, but ingested fireworks can lead to an emergency situation. For the pet that isn’t afraid of anything, they might chase and capture the pod–they might swallow poison or get burned. Then too, while you have your eyes on the sparklers or whatever, who would see the Weimaraner’s stealthy action at the food table or in the garbage. Cooked bones (in particular poultry) can be deadly. Long after the plate is cleaned (or the trash raided) the reality can surface. It is hard to be vigilant 24 X 7 on a day such as today. The Weimaraner is paw-ty smart and manipulative by nature.

Thank you, for including your Weimaraner in the family activities. Only you know what is appropriate. We mention these potential dangers because it is impossible to think of everything in the midst of all we are doing to make the day special. We don’t want your holiday ruined due to one moment you let down your guard. Here’s to hoping everyone comes through without a hitch. Have a fabulous 4th of July!

PS: This photo at the top is of Lily–from her Daycare this week where they celebrated the holiday early.

Elio

At 16 Weeks

Lorenzen's Elio June 23 2017Elio continues to be an absolute joy and an incredible addition to my little fur family!  He’s a calm, well-mannered puppy who picks up on things incredibly fast! We’re going into week 3 of puppy classes and he’s doing great! 🙂

Breeder Comment

Vaccine Crossroad

A Reminder to Proceed with Caution

The Sadie X Stackhouse Litter will celebrate their sixteen-week birthday on this coming Sunday (June 25th). That brings everyone to a crossroad. By now a lot has happened, and everyone will have found themselves insanely busy raising their Weimaraner. The Weimaraner’s (and the OwyheeStar) Vaccine Protocol can have been forgotten.

Your Veterinary office will have a different (broad-based) vaccine protocol. Even if they agree to follow the recommendations, it will fall on the pup’s owner to remember these details. We suggest putting the dates on your calendar and ignoring the Veterinary office alerts. Otherwise, it gets very confusing. If you have forgotten the protocol read on1

 

  • 6-Week NEOPAR® Puppy Shot(given at OwyheeStar)
  • 9-Week *Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • 12- Week *Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • Other vaccines such as Lepto and Kennel Cough (Bordatella) should be given as needed–and avoided when possible. We recommend not combining these shots with any other vaccine–, especially rabies. Vaccine challenges the immune system to build antibodies; therefore, we strongly encourage you to space Lepto, Bordetella, and Rabies vaccination at least two weeks apart. We realize that many veterinary practices give multiple vaccinations at a single visit; however, this approach is easier on the immune system. If a reaction does occur, then you know what caused it and plan to avoid it in the future. Yes, we understand this is a more costly approach–avoiding the risk is worth it!
  • 16-Week Crossroad <== Opt for the Vaccine Titer Test instead of automatically getting another puppy shot. Your Vet is going to recommend just doing the shot because that is typical for the all-breed approach; however, a percentage of Weims are vaccine sensitive. Although your pup probably never had a reaction before, please do not ignore this warning. Even a mild vaccine reaction can trigger immune system issues–some of these lead to on-going health problems and in certain instances death. It is not worth the risk! The vaccine titer test runs more than double the cost of the typical puppy shot, but it might save you thousands over time as well as the potential heartache. Almost without exception, our protocol has been producing immunity by week sixteen, which means your puppy doesn’t need any more essential vaccine. If you need the optional vaccines (Bordetella or Lepto) these can be done; however, please space them at least two weeks apart from the Rabies.
  • Vaccine Blog Post   For the OwyheeStar Client Only click here! (requires password)

PUPPY VACCINE CLARIFICATION (Lepto)

There is a significant push by the Veterinary community (due to the recent rise of Lepto) to include Lepto in the puppy shot. The Weimaraner Club of America (as well as others who study this breed) recommend you wait to give the Lepto, etc. until the puppy shots are completed. The puppy shot should not include Lepto or Corona. No other vaccine should be combined with the puppy shot. Waiting for the Lepto, Bordetella, and another vaccine until the pup is a little older is less risky. It takes more effort and costs a bit more to space the vaccine, but is worth it.

What is the DAPPv?

Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1 (Hepatitis), Adenovirus Type 2 (Respiratory Disease), Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus (Click Here to read more about the vaccine we use. Remember the Puppy Shot should not contain the Lepto or Corona.

OwyheeStar Disclaimer

The Weimaraner Club of America (WCA) Vaccine Protocol

We are neither Licensed Veterinarians nor Licensed Veterinary Techs. Our recommendations are based on twenty-plus years breeding the Weimaraner (exclusively) as well as the breed recommendation (from the Weimaraner Club of America). Ultimately, you have to decide what is the best approach. This protocol is considered a more Holistic and safer approach. That being said, our advice cannot replace that of your Veterinary of choice. 

Insurance

Consider This!

_Rhune's Kula Bleu _1280px[1]The price quotes below are just a sample of what can go wrong. We have heard quotes hovering around the $ 4,000 mark for some procedures–for example, GVD intervention. Bloat can be sudden and is always an emergency. The Weimaraner is one of the targeted breeds for this horrendous life-threatening health issue. Click here to read more. As with humans, there are the typical ailments that can come and rob us of time. We want to eke out as much time together as is possible; insurance can help us get more.

The athletic Weimaraner can suffer a torn or ruptured ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). Possibly if one side goes, then the other will too–according to the experts. Joint replacement is possible. If this happens, you want to be able to take care of your fur family member and best friend.

We don’t make a fee if you sign up for insurance this or other insurance. AKC doesn’t have the only gig in town. Our Vet office prefers Pets Best, but they have had a result with other insurances as well as the AKC recommended.

We received this from AKC

Thanks to amazing advances in veterinary medicine, treatment for your pet’s accidents and illnesses are more successful today – but often at a high cost.

Below is a list of claims paid to our current policyholders. As you can see, it can be expensive to keep our pets healthy! Luckily our pet insurance can help keep costs down for a low monthly premium.

 

Breed Accident/Illness State Total Cost Amount Paid
Old English Sheep Dog Lymphoma TX $1,290 $1,003
Doberman Pinscher Cruciate Tear CA $2,800 $2,202
Beagle Foreign Body Ingestion NC $1,988 $1,500
Bichon Frise Bladder Stones NY $1,301 $1,010

You probably received this from AKC too! We suggest that checking into Major Medical Coverage for your beloved Weimaraner. You don’t want their life cut short, nor for them to have to limp along with a career ending injury. All too soon the end will stare you in the face. All this goodness last but a season it seems.

Waiting

This is Where We Sleep

           ~ Right Mama?!?

 

17992317_1301969653186338_5810763892627142803_nDoes your Weimaraner sleep with you or get snuggle time on (or in) the bed? The debate about whether you should allow your dog in your bed is a thing. Ultimately, it is a personal choice. Some reports indicate that nearly 80% of dog owners allow their pet in their bed. Do you?

Here are some links on the topic!

Your Choice

Your opinion matters. We live in the information age. You can find supporting evidence no matter the side you endorse. It is a personal thing. We ought to be aware of any risk and from there decide based on our lifestyle.

Dusty

Dusty has a Job

dusty-for-chewy-com_0587He has been practicing his product presentation. He was particularly happy with himself when it came to Fortiflora and Zukes Minis

If you have been to the Vet for antibiotics or vaccine now is the time to add some good bacteria to your Weim’s gut. It would even be better to add some just before the vaccine. There are many times when the addition of some bacteria is a good idea. fortifloraYogurt (with live cultures) can be an option; however, it doesn’t come close to offering the same outcome. Keep this on your shelf. Click here to purchase from Chewy.com.

  • Helps reduce flatulence (gas) in dogs and contains 100 Million live microorganisms
  • Proven to promote intestinal health & balance with microencapsulated probiotics, which guarantees that they arrive alive in your pet’s digestive tract
  • Contains antioxidant vitamins E, C and beta-carotene which have been shown to support a strong immune system
  • Tastes great, has excellent palatability and may even increase a pet’s desire to eat
  • Easy to feed – just sprinkle on your pet’s food

 

Thanksgiving 2016

Celebrate

       ~ Please Keep In Mind

10703995_10203865392493285_2238146014813983610_n (1)We send you the warmest of greetings. Thank you for your faithful friendship. We value our relationship. It is the season to give thanks and to remember all we have to celebrate.

  1. We are thankful for our family.
  2. We are thankful for the life we can lead–thank you to those who made this possible. (veterans, and those who paid the ultimate sacrifice–including their families).
  3. We are thankful to our God for his provision
  4. We are thankful for our friends, and clients–many times they are one in the same.

Today–it will find many of you traveling, or scurrying to make-ready. We, likewise, have things associated with the Thanksgiving holiday to prepare for as well as our usual daily hoopla. We cannot omit the fact that we are thankful for the Weimaraner. This fact goes without saying. It speaks to the heart of our life; these wonderful fur family members are those who bring a smile to so many people every day.

 Preventing the Unthinkable

The last thing any of us want is a trip to the emergency room (albeit for a human, or the Weimaraner). This scenario is never truer than in the midst of a holiday. Unfortunately, this is a time when we can become distracted for a moment, or miss what is happening. It is hard to keep an eye on all the well-meaning guests who want to sneak a tidbit to the Weim, or the plates left unattended. Here are some things to keep forefront in your mind during our celebration.

  1. Counter-surfing — it takes a moment, and they have snatched it.
  2. Trash-raiding — make sure it is Weimaraner safe. Ingested cooked turkey bones, foil, string, and a myriad of other items can lead to emergency surgery.
  3. Skip the bones entirely — you might want to treat them, but things can go awry.
  4. Table scraps need to be carefully monitored. With guests sneaking them a bit here and there, it can easily get out of control. These rich additions can upset their tummy, or trigger a more severe condition. For example, the turkey skin might seem harmless, but the fatty morsel (or too much human food in general) could trigger a pancreatic attack. Weims tend to have a sensitive tummy; however, the important thing is to remember a dog cannot handle all this fatty and calorie-laden holiday food (or the trimmings). The best approach would be to set a dish of allowed scraps and tell people they must not have any more than what is on the plate. This strategy may not prevent the well-meaning guest from giving them the forbidden.
  5. Ingested rising bread or roll dough stories abound on the Internet. Yes, it does pose a danger. Cake, and yeasty bread batter when ingested, expands rapidly in the dog’s gut.
  6. The dangers are not limited to what we plan to eat. Remember the risk includes candles, cut flowers, alcohol, potpourri, etc.
  7. Finally, do not forget about things like sugarless gum, candy, etc. The Weimaraner is opportunistic, and they can find a jelly bean at the bottom of someone’s handbag.

Manners and Your Guests

Respect is a two-way street. Some Weimaraners will jump up, and they do it playfully. They may like to nibble or corn-bite as some call it, or even nip when they get excited. Their toenails could catch grandma’s skin, and cause an unintentional dangerous scratch–looking like an encounter with a knife. They could knock a child or unstable person to the ground. Even the well-mannered dog could be playing, and someone could catch a tooth. Unfortunately, this can lead to serious problems–a trip to the emergency room, reports filed, and people making accusations about your Weimaraner. Another side of the issue is you don’t know what someone is doing to the Weimaraner when you are not looking. Things can go awry in fast order if the family pet becomes challenged, afraid, or territorial. Make every effort to avoid these situations. It is not unthinkable to use a crate–when you cannot be in control of the situation. The saying– it is better safe than sorry is true.

We cannot say what is the best situation for you, and your gathering. We suggest you proceed with caution. The crate-trained Weimaraner might be safer in their den. Putting them out in the yard, while everyone is inside can also cause issues. The Weimaraner is like a child who never grows up. The high energy filled Weimaraner doesn’t stand down. The aroma stimulates and fuels their excitement. Ultimately, we all want them to be a huge part of everything we do. They require supervision. 

The Weimaraner is part of your family. You must plan for them like everyone else. Thank you for remembering that during this holiday season.

 

Titer Test

Mousse X Stackhouse

~ The Titer Test Results are In!

We had the titer test done last week.  It showed positive so Maverick is good with the vaccines that he has had done so far.  Our Vet recommended that we bring him in this week for his rabies.

Schweitzer's Maverick_5373

I have attached a recent picture of him.  He is getting big!  If his paws are any indicator… he is going to be a BIG boy!  

Dodging a Potential Issue

Lisa and Sadie

 

IMG_0660[1].JPG

“What Do You Mean We Have To Move?”

Hello, my name is Lisa, and our weim is Sadie.  She just had her 7th birthday on 4/29.  We are going to relocate from our house to an apartment.

Sadie does have a lot of separation anxiety when she’s left home alone.  She is mostly never home alone for longer than an hour.  We take her with us in the car when it is possible. Sadie barks the full time she is left alone in the car. She sometimes quiets if she sees us go into the store. Anyhow, she doesn’t like to be away from us.
The weather is warming up here in Vancouver, WA. I cannot be taking her along and leaving her in the car. The warmer weather means that she must be left alone at home rather than taking her along. Now that we are moving it concerns me–I mean the heat means we need to leave her behind. I’m also concerned she will have a difficult time adjusting to her new surroundings or will she?
Can you tell me how to help Sadie become accustomed to the new apartment?

Thoughts from Cliff and Shela

Separation anxiety is something the Weimaraner is prone to develop. The best approach is preventative; however, even once your Weim has a healthy dose all is not lost. Here are a few thoughts that may help Sadie deal with or adjust to the changes.
1. First, don’t make a big deal out of the move yourself. Your frustration, anxiety, and concern will be internalized and externalized by Sadie. The Weimaraner tends to pick up on our cues.
2. Rely on the crate and go back to the basics. Freedom is earned until the adjustment is made. Safety first and apartment living also means closer neighbors.
3. Depending upon Sadies quirks, it might be a good idea to sleep on a pillowcase and then use it for a bedding cover in the crate. Don’t wash it–get your scent on it and then just use it. Your scent is a powerful thing to her–a comfort. Nevertheless, if she chews up her bedding and ingests it that can create a different kind of havoc.
4. If Sadie’s anxiety is severe, you might consider using Prozac. Medication can be a short-term solution to help her bridge the change. We like to avoid this situation; however, it is a judgment call as to whether this is something you need. If you are concerned, consider asking your Veterinary if this would be an option.
5. Old dogs can learn new tricks and one way you can help Sadie a lot is to help her learn to be more adaptable. That means mixing up her schedule and introducing new things. Don’t make a big deal out of this but even before you move, try relocating her crate and using it more. Do things in a different way instead of keeping things even keel.
6. Try to make a new Vancouver doggie friend and schedule a play date. Maybe you can work out a situation where you help someone else by taking the kids for an adventure and Sadie can learn to go with them. A home-away-from-home situation is always a welcome alternative.
7. Remain calm and believe in your heart everything is going to work out. Positive and upbeat thoughts will help you succeed.

Tell Us What Worked For You

We welcome ideas from our OwyheeStar clients. Can you help Sadie with this adjustment process? Please drop a comment here for Sadie and her mother. They live in the Vancouver, WA area if that helps anyone with a suggestion.