Category Archives: Longevity

The Depth of it All

Olli

~ He has never known life without Rudi

Loeffelholz's Olli_0446

Yesterday we made the difficult decision to put Rudi down. He was 14 and his back arthritis was worsening. It was the right thing to do and one of the hardest decisions we have ever had to make. It was our turn to love unconditionally and he is now stalking rabbits with his buddies.
Olli has not yet figured out the permanence of the change. He knew something was going on and that Rudi was not doing well. He wanted to snuggle with him on Rudi’s bed but Rudi was not having any of it.  Re picture below is one we took several months ago in the distillery. Two very different temperaments and we love both of them dearly for their personalities and joy that they bring.
Hope you and Cliff are doing well. ~Mary

NuVet

PS – when we got Olli we started both dogs on Nuvet. Rudi had horrible allergies but they steadily improved over the last 2 years to the point of not needing any medication. Coincidence?  I think not. We are sold on the benefits.

Breeder Comment

Eventually, something is going require us to let them go. This gut-wrenching experience is a personal one. A loss is never easy–it affects each of us differently. We process it in our way–honor them in a way significant to us. Some folks grieve for a long time and cannot entertain the thought of getting another. Others feel free to move forward. They are almost driven to find another and begin a new journey. Their take is the departing Weim would want nothing less for them.

Most of us want to extend the journey together as long as it is feasibly possible. With insurance knee replacements, hip replacements, and other major surgical procedures are within reach.

 

How Long Do We Have?

That is a good question. No one can guess. There simply is no guarantee you will get 14 years, or even 11. The only way to approach this risky relationship is to count every day as a special blessing.

From Our Side

If you sat where I sit you would feel what I feel. I read notes from people all the time; ………not always OwyheeStar people. In fact, these are usually not from our clients but people who are seeking and searching for other than what happened to them. They look to avoid whatever health issue took their fur baby away. I am quick to tell them that anything could happen. It scares me when we place a puppy with someone who writes me that they lost their last Weimaraner to a rare form of cancer. I secretly fear that rare cancer could strike again—even many years ago when it had never happened. Honestly, I only remember once it happened –cancer of larynx took a client’s six-year old Weimaraner. She got another from us, but it didn’t replace the first OwyheeStar in her heart.

This concern of someone having an untimely loss is only one of the many stressors in my life—I do care. I think when you adopt a rescue anything can happen. Also, when you bring home a puppy things can happen as well. The risk of loving our beloved Weimaraner is huge but worth it.

Out and About

With Dusty

 

Dusty At the SanctuaryIt has been a long hard winter at OwyheeStar. Most of you know the snow was piled high and the remaining meltdown lasted until early March. The snow was not user-friendly–Cliff got some snowshoed which helped, but later it was nothing but a slick wet surface that was not conducive to travel. Therefore, exercise was limited.

Dusty At the Sanctuary-2Dusty had the best romp since late last fall a couple of days ago. He made a trip to the Three Cliff’s Sanctuary (the natural unfarmed corner of our property). Our Original Blue Boy also got a chance to swim in the pond. We didn’t capture photos, but he enjoyed the water.Dusty At the Sanctuary-3

Nose to Ground–there have been birds and other critters here.

Dusty At the Sanctuary-4

At twelve-and-a-half years of age, he is still looking good. One never knows how long one of the extraordinary soul-buddies will remain with us. Each moment is precious. So many of you have Dusty in your pup’s lineage. We are positive you would like to see him doing well.

Irreplaceable

Sadie

cranes-sadie

I’m Devastated

I’ve thought about you guys often over the years.  Sadie was born on Sept 12, 2003. I just lost her yesterday.  She was the most amazing dog ever and I’m so unbelievably devastated with her loss.  Her ½ sister Moxie is doing great and full of health and muscle and I cannot see the pain in her yet with the loss.  Max was another we adopted along the way as well and I’m sure both will find it hard not to have her around.  It was so funny how many dogs were attracted to Sadie.  Something about her was so appealing to them.  My wife and I would always comment how good she smelled and how good her temperament was.  

She Did It All

She was everything I asked for in my initial application for her.  She was and is beyond a perfect match.  She got to enjoy lots of mountain time and ultimately probably beat her up too much but she did enjoy an abundance of fun times hiking, biking, swimming, boating, wondering around, playing in the snow, going to the lake and going on appointments all the way through Monday to house showings.  

My Constant Companion

It was so neat to see how she never wanted to be away from my side.  I could sit in my chair with her at my side and it was amazing to see how she would sit and just gaze in my eyes for hours.  

On a cold winter day, it was always comforting for both of us to have cuddles on the couch.  She always wanted to be between my legs and on the bed she always wanted to be in the crease of my armpit and chest.

How I will Miss those Kisses

Something else about this lovely girl is how she’s always raised her nose to the sky and ask you to give her kisses on her neck, face, and ears.  I’ll miss those greatly along with how she would always smile.

Future OwyheeStar

Are you guys still breeding?  It may be another 6 to 12 months before I am ready but am interested in another great family member to build another great friendship and bond with.

Forever Grateful

Crane's Three.jpegOut of the 1000 photos I have of my furry’s I hope you enjoy these two.

Thank you so much.  I’m ever grateful to you as breeders for giving me something so special and for God to allow me 13 great years with her.  She can never be replaced and will never be forgotten.  

In LOVING memory of Sadie 9.12.03 – 9.27.16

Breeder Comment

We are sad to hear that Sadie had to depart our world. We are positive that her trip over the rainbow bridge was provided for in the same manner she lived. Thank you for all you did with and for her during the 13+ years she lived and played with you.

Yes, we still raise the Weimaraner. Thank you for allowing us to post your testimonial and this tribute to Sadie.

Longevity, Loss, and Grieving

Our newest series is on loss, grieving and longevity. We started this series on February 2, 2011.

Some OwyheeStar inquiries are a product of loss. There are times when we see all too many inquiries due to loss. Some start off that they lost their beloved Weimaraner of 10+ years. Unless you have been owned and loved by one of these creatures you cannot fathom the depth of loss and the resulting grief. Others facing loss may have had a beloved Lab, GSP, etc. and they are facing heartache too!

Loss can be due to natural causes and the normal aging process. Loss can be due an accident. Loss could be due to catastrophic event. None of us know how long we will live nor how long our Weimaraner will be with us. It is never long enough! Sometimes losing a fur-family-member is more painful than human loss. Sometimes this catches us by surprise. Sometimes this makes friends or extended family members wonder about us.

Often those who have suffered such a loss get another Weimaraner or their first Weimaraner. We all know their former can not be replaced, however, they move forward in hope. They begin a new journey with a new friend. It is not the same journey. The travel will take them to new places and new experiences. New memories will be forged in their mind, spirit, and heart. Along the way they will there will be reminders of the former. The journey and relationship, however, will never be exactly the same.

Yes, in face of their beloved Weim’s absence they move forward. They move forward knowing that their beloved departed Weimaraner would want nothing less for them. In their absence they wish puppy breath, paw prints, and frolics. They wish you healing and wholeness. If you have walked through this and are starting down a new road with a new puppy you can identify.

Normally, it is a sweet but sad start to a new relationship. Here at OwyheeStar we as well hope for healing. We hope this will be a rewarding adventure. Yes, there will be challenges. You went down this road with the first but that in most cases was a long time ago. It is a lot of work and requires commitment to get back to the same comfortable relationship. There is no shortcut!

Having experienced this gut-wrenching loss, many get their new puppy adjusted and settled. Then their thoughts turn to adding a second family Weimar. The thought of being Weimless again is too painful.

No matter how a person deals with the grief they must move forward. Each of us finds a way to honor their Weimaraner’s memory. Memories are a precious treasure. Some choose cremation and they spread ashes along significant locations. Others build a pine box or buy a special casket.There are also pet cemeteries, monuments, and online tributes. However you choose to honor your relationship it will reflect your personality.

In reality, many will not understand the depth of your loss. They may send condolences seeing your grief but those that understand are those that have walked down the road.

OwyheeStar wants you to know….

If you have suffered loss our heart goes out to you. Words seem inadequate to cover such a loss………

We send you puppy kisses, puppy breath, and paw prints on your heart. We wish you healing and may your memories carry you through.

May you love and be loved again!



Aging Gracefully and Longevity

Aging happens even to our beloved Weimaraner………

 

Dottie and Granddad off to tour the farm..

Aging happens.  Slowing down happens.  Staying active is important whether you are a human or canine. Regardless a time comes when you cannot do what you once could.

Watching this happen to your beloved Weim is harder in many ways than having it happen to yourself. We always expect to beat the curve with our Weimaraner. If we expect 12 years then we want 16. Who can blame us?

A few Weimlovers are fortunate and have a 16 year Weim resident. More often longevity falls mid-range somewhere between 10 and 12 years of age. When the loss occurs it sends their family and friends reeling. We tend to think their life was cut short. It is truly never long enough. Who could love us more than our beloved Weim???

How long will your Weimaraner live? Truth be told –Not long enough! Barring something unforeseen you should be able to have at least a good decade if not a few additional years.

This is the first in a new OwyheeStar series on loss and grieving. Slowing down an aging are the precursor to the event none of want to embrace.