Author Archives: OwyheeStar

Hello From OwyheeStar

~Cliff, Shela, and the Weimaraners

August 8, 2020

Sunrise October 21 2017

Summer heat in the triple-digits is here. Farmers are pouring the water to their crops, town people to their lawns. Meanwhile, the sweet corn harvest and other fresh veggies are available at the Saturday market, the farm stands, and even the grocery.

Oregon schools and high school sports is an equally hot topic. The OSAA’s new calendar provides three distinct seasons from late December to late June with limited overlap between seasons. 

Traditional Winter activities will take place in January and February (Season 2), followed by Fall activities in March and April (Season 3), with Spring activities occurring in May and June (Season 4). It means they plan for Spring Football and later start for basketball–probably fewer games for everyone. Most everyone is trying to make the most out of a difficult situation.

AT OWYHEESTAR

We are busy with the business of pups–go figure. We thought you might enjoy this behind the scenes video. Christina has been working with the pups inside the house and out on the lawn.

This Week On the Blog…

Thanks to our faithful OwyheeStar contributors–they make this all possible. We sincerely hope our readers enjoyed these updates as much as we did, too.

Once again, we find our supply of blog material running low again. If you can help, send me a note. It would be greatly appreciated.

If you have a story that you will let me share–I need at least three sentences and a decent photo. I prefer to receive it via email. (FYI–we only use stories that feature the OwyheeStar Weimaraner).

Sunday— August 2 — Berry Pickers Wanted–Or Not

Monday–- August 3 — Tango–Part One

Tuesday – August 4— Tango–Part Two

Wednesday — August 5 — Puppy Development

Thursday –- August 6 — I love you deer

Friday — August 7 — Don’t Let It Happen To You

On a very personal note

Cliff is feeling better–but still has a way to go. We sincerely hope that this third round of treatment eradicates pneumonia and that it doesn’t rear its ugly head again. (OMG) He is still taking antibiotics–and yes, for those concerned, he also has probiotics.

Otherwise, things have been pretty much as usual. Cliff has been busy working on the shop and with the Weimaraners. We bought a new chest for a freeze dryer, which should arrive before the end of the month. I have been setting that up and getting things ready.

The garden is coming along nicely–considering the lateness of our planting. Cliff and I didn’t put a lot into the whole process early this spring. I am thrilled to see the Oxhart tomatoes are producing nicely. Those were our favorite tasting tomatoes last year. We have had two, which Cliff and I ate this week. More than anything in the garden, I am delighted that the Hibiscus that I grew from seed are producing blooms. The plants are small, but it is the first year. I hope they winter over–I think I will dig up half of the plants and put them inside the greenhouse for the winter.

Don’t Let It Happen To You

AKC Reunite Reports that One in three pets will go missing in its lifetime — and it can happen in an instant. 

We admit those numbers seem high to us. Most OwyheeStar puppy folks never lose track of their Weimaraner. That is not to say it doesn’t happen. All our OwyheeStar pups leave with the AKC Reunite Microchip–but each family must register their chip. Beyond the microchip, you should consider other identification–such as a tag securely attached to their collar or harness.

Should you include your dog’s name on their collar? Including your pet’s name on their collar is a common practice, but is it a good idea? Cliff suggests it is better to exclude the pet’s name. Instead, provide your name, location, and a couple of phone numbers where you can be reached..

Providing your pup’s name on the collar can make it easier for someone else to appear to be the owner–because they are calling them by their name. Anyhow, it is food for thought.

While the microchip registered to you ensures you are listed as the owner, veterinarians, and other pet professionals do not scan every dog they encounter. Suspicious behavior might alert them to the need, but possibly they are pressed for time and feeling they are overreacting–even a new dog client may not be scanned. And keep in mind that merely recording an ID in their folder is not going to alert anyone. You see where we are going with this–two things. 1. Be sure to register your microchip. 2. Be sure to have identification on your pet’s collar. No one wants to become a statistic.

Should you happen to get separated, with your pet’s microchip registered through AKC Reunite, getting back together is more likely.

I Love you Deer

~ Colby Checks it Out

Hi!  I hope this finds you doing well!  I thought you might like a photo for the blog. 


My husband and I celebrated our 13 year anniversary and Colby couldn’t be more excited about “daddy’s” gift.  I told him you that “I love you, deer! May I have a nibble, now?” is not something you should say when having your first encounter with a new friend.  He disagreed. 

Blessings to you! 
~Jenn

Breeder Comment

I sure Colby could not believe his good fortune–and indeed, he wanted a nibble. His new chewy –but …

Puppy Development

~ The Adult-Looking Nine-Month Old Weimaraner

IMG_4306

36 weeks (from AKC)

At 9 months, you’re probably starting to wonder when your puppy will be fully grown. Expect your adolescent puppy to continue to grow and develop emotionally for a little while longer, and keep up on your puppy’s training. Take a moment during training to reflect on what you might be doing to encourage some of your puppy’s bad habits and make a commitment to change your behavior.

Miles kissing

These comments are meant for puppies in general; however, they apply even more so for the Weimaraner puppy. Letting your 12-week old pup jump up is not a good idea. If you do, by the time they are 9-months-old, you have a bigger problem. Letting them bite your fingers–as a young pup, may well lead to mouthing issues as the Weimaraner matures. Some do this mouthing-thing for their entire life–and for their owner, it might not seem like a problem until they put their mouth on someone else–those teeth can easily tear a hole in a thin-skinned older adult, or alarm someone.

Tango

~The Ladies’ Man — Part Two

Tango’s “girlfriend” moved into the house across the street at the end of March. She’s three quarters Border Collie, one quarter Miniature Australian Shepherd. Her “dad” and I enjoy cracking a cold one in the field down the street, so if the weather is cool enough, one of us will text the other: “Field?”

Lily has a definite speed advantage on Tango, and a tight turning radius on her little legs. Because they met when Tango was around her size, he perceives her as equal in size, rather than less than half of his. She’s a sweetheart, but she’s good at keeping him in check when he gets a little too eager.

You realize Tango is very social this is his friend Abby–she’s half chocolate lab, half silver lab.


What a big adventure we embarked upon together just six short months ago, never expecting that fate would offer us so much more bonding time during these early months. He’s quite the little playboy. And not a day goes by without some stranger informing us how gorgeous he is.

Breeder Comment

Well first spoke to you six months ago and helped you plot a plan to raise the Weimaraner. You have excelled –for this, we are exceedingly happy. The Weimaraner is not the breed for everyone. As you well know, there are challenges. There are other breeds less challenging to get raised, but Tango is doing well. (Hurrah!) Of course, a Weimaraner is a puppy for three years. What can I say, and then they act puppy-like even longer. Some act puppyish for their entire life. They are full of life and energy, but this scenario helps to keep us young and active. Then there is that thing where they burrow deep into our heart and soul. What else can I say?

Tango

~The Ladies’ Man — Part One

As we continue to limit our exposure outside the house, the bulk of my social life consists of daily trips to the nearby dog park, sometimes supplemented by another outing if the temperature is tolerable. Tango has fun with lots of dogs, but it does seem as if he especially enjoys his time with the ladies.


At the dog park, he’s especially fond of three regulars: a Beagle, a Samoyed, and a Golden Retriever. Given the size difference, he’s fairly gentle with the Beagle, but the other two sure run him ragged. (That’s the point of a dog park run, right?)


We have a standing invitation to visit Judy’s co-worker’s farm. When we’re there, his running and wrestling matches with their Labrador turn positively ballistic. She really terrified him the first couple of times that we visited, but now he’s taller than her (she’ll have the weight advantage for a couple more months), so the tables are turning. A couple of weeks ago, her “parents” were away and we stopped in to let her run around, so that turned into four straight play dates in a row.

Breeder Comment

As we read your update, we were impressed on so many levels. You have managed an excellent socialization process despite the current COVID issue. And secondly, how Tango has changed your life–it is incredible how the Weimaraner changes a family structure and each of us in unpredictable ways. I like to think they make us better humans.

For our readers–watch for part two of Tango’s update. We know you look forward to hearing more about Tango’s life and experiences.


Berry Pickers Wanted–Or Not

~ We Are At Your Service

In Oregon, Pushkin and Zula Blue have been eating their share of blueberries. And most of us spotted Dink with the strawberry. What more do we say?

Breeder Comment

It is not the first trip to the berries or the garden–in fact, Zula and Pushkin were featured with the blueberries before.

Hello From OwyheeStar

~Cliff, Shela, and the Weimaraners

August 1, 2020

Sunrise October 21 2017

The garden coming into its own a bit later than I had hoped. We have not seen much from our former Gardening Girls–so I am guessing they won’t be asking us for produce. I am sure they pick it up from friends here and there. Stopping by to see us weekly is going to be a lot.

Our hay got baled and added to the stack–75 bales. That was the second cutting for 2020–typically, we would be looking at a third cutting, but the first was very late. Even then, the rains made it difficult to get baled. This time we got a shower on the freshly cut hay, but it was dry very quickly. (Hurrah)

AT OWYHEESTAR

The Treasure Valley North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association group has canceled the summer training–COVID, etc. So, any training Cliff gets done will be here on the farm.

Otherwise, there are always things to be done with the puppies. Two are a good-sized armload for Christina. When we speak of things–photos, nail trimming, worming, and socialization come to mind.

This Week On the Blog…

As always, thanks to our faithful OwyheeStar contributors–they make this all possible. We sincerely hope our readers enjoyed these updates as much as we did, too. This week we find our supply of material running low again. If you can help, send me a note.

If you have a story that you will let me share–I need at least three sentences and a decent photo. I prefer to receive it via email. (FYI–we only use stories that feature the OwyheeStar Weimaraner).

Sunday— July 26 — Puppy Faces

Monday–- July 27 — Weim Privilege Denied

Tuesday – July 28— Luna

Wednesday — July 29 — Enzo

Thursday –- July 30 — I was Confused

Friday — July 31 — Keeping Your Weim Safe in the Heat

On a very personal note

Bradley is still playing basketball–this weekend, it is right here in the Treasure Valley. He is playing with the best of the best–hurrah. He started last night’s game and excelled. Sadly, it was not live-streamed so that we could watch the game.

Cliff has been to the doctor again this week, too. Pneumonia has come back on him a third time. So, it is around round of antibiotics–each time a different one trying to get this under control. I sincerely hope this eradicates it. The good news is that it was only in one lobe of one lung–before it had been in both lungs.

I have ordered quite a few things recently–this box from Chewy was smashed, but fortunately, the expensive bottle of ear treatment came through untouched. Another box sits in the trash next to my desk equally damaged, but once again, nothing was hurt. It made me happy because who needs the trouble of making a claim?

We wear our masks when we must–social distance, etc. There are substantial COVID numbers for the county of Malheur. No one can speak precisely to why these numbers are so high, but we take every precaution. I love this mask that Nancy Garin made for me–I mean, if I must wear a mask, you understand. I don’t like it, and I have to be very careful about wearing one because my lungs suffer.

Our long time friend Ellen, who gave me the lovely cyclamen back in 2012, is going through a difficult time. Bob (her husband) has been hanging by a thread for quite some time. He has been diagnosed with congestive heart failure and a list of other significant life-threatening diagnoses. He is hanging on–it is challenging for the both of them. We count our blessings and think of others who have it far worse.

Tips for having Fun in the Sun with our Doggies

Note: This article first appeared in the Waterland Blog on Jul 29, 2020 | –used with permission.

Jan’s dog ‘Willow’ keeping cool!

By Jan Magnuson

We all enjoy playing with our pups and taking them for walks and hikes during this sunny time of year! Just like we take into account the potential effects of the direct sunlight, warm temperatures, and humidity on ourselves, we also should consider how our “furry family members” will fare! I adore my three girls “Willow,” “Daisy,” and “Violet,” and want to always make sure they are safe, healthy, and happy!

Before beginning a summer exercise routine with our dogs, it is a great idea to have them examined by our veterinarian to make sure they are able to safely participate. We should ask if our dogs have any health considerations or special needs that should be addressed before we take them out and about with us in the summertime weather.

We need to consider our dogs’ individual challenges to the warm weather like how much coat they have, if they are overweight and out of shape, or if they have a “pug face” (“brachycephalic”, like my Japanese Chin “Violet”) in addition to any specific health issues they may have like prior injuries, strains or arthritis, skin inflammation, etc.

When we are ready to go out with them, it is a good idea to have a small basic first-aid kit, our cell phone (with our vet’s and emergency vet’s phone numbers), and of course fresh water for them and for us. If we are going to take a longer hike, having snacks may be appropriate as well.

Because I am so active with my dogs, I have many different locations I take them for playtime, walks and hikes. So, on days that are hotter than others, I take them to a trail I know has more shade and is cooler and is possibly even near water. I also tend to do “laps” instead of going straight up and then back, as that way if it gets really hot, we can stop anytime mid-lap instead of having to go a long distance back to our truck.

Another consideration is if the walking surface – pavement, concrete, gravel – on a trail or roadway could be too hot. I place my hand flat on the surface and if it feels too hot for me, it is too hot for my dogs’ pads! So, using a trail that is grass and has lots of shade is a better option, or I can walk on the paved trail but make sure my dogs walk on the grass.

Stopping often in the shade to allow our dogs to lie down and relax and get a drink of water is helpful too.

Always watching our dogs to make sure they do not overheat is imperative – dogs can get too hot very quickly, so we should always keep an eye on them to make certain they are not showing any symptoms of heat exhaustion, as that can quickly become an emergency.

More info here: https://www.petmd.com/dog/emergency/common-emergencies/e_dg_heat_stroke

Breeder Comment

Thank you, Jan–there are no adequate words to cover all you have done for us and with Willow.

Willow has been a superstar her entire life!  She has attained many titles and awards (see above) for Conformation, Obedience and Rally Obedience, Agility, Tricks, and Good Citizen, and include 5 UKC Altered Best-In-Show and 14 Altered Reserve Best-In-Show awards!

I Was Confused

~ About Who Was Driving or Who Should Be at the Wheel

Tripp has traveled all over the Pacific Northwest, and recently he made a journey that included Yellowstone and other noted locations. Clearly, he would be fine if his mother road in the backseat–but getting his paws on the wheel –no telling where that would lead.

Breeder Comment

Oh, the life of Tripp–he has had the most exciting adventures. Seen places about which some of us can only dream. Thanks to his ever so faithful Mama.