Category Archives: General Health

Extending our Time

Delicate Discussions

   ~ Part Two

5-Hollee X Benton_4942

Last Friday we discussed the accidental loss of the Weimaraner. One of those haunting and gut-wrenching scenarios that stick with you forever. Of course, we have to be ever vigilant and make sure they are as secure as it is possible. There are; however, other considerations that may well extend your pup’s chance of survival.

No one wants to consider that they might lose their puppy sooner rather than later. While there are no guarantees there a few things we can do to increase the potential longevity.

  1.  Be cautious with the vaccine — we recommend never doubling up the vaccine. That means if you are planning to get an annual DAPPv (Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1 (Hepatitis), Adenovirus Type 2 (Respiratory Disease), Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus) do not combine it with Lepto, Kennel Cough Protection, or the Rabies. It may be your Vet’s standard protocol, but spreading them out is less of a hit on their immune system. (Getting the Lepto only vaccine also gives you greater protection against Lepto).8-Bernie X Boone WK1-22Follow the suggested OwyheeStar puppy vaccine protocol and get a titer test instead of the typical sixteen-week puppy shot. Getting the titers checked for immunity is the smart approach–even if your puppy has shown no sign of being vaccine reactive. Most Weimaraners who have a severe, life-threatening reaction to the sixteen-week shot never had a problem with any previous puppy vaccination. The vaccine titer costs a bit more but nothing in comparison to developing an ongoing immune system issue.

    After the one-year booster, you might consider (down the road) checking the titers again to see if they are still immune. Many professionals have come around to the idea that the DAPPv protection often lasts three years or even longer. The beautiful thing about a titer test is you can find out their immunity level. The unnecessary vaccine could be a potential trigger to a serious health issue.

  2.  Be as Holistic as possible. There are different approaches to Veterinary care. According to the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (AHVMA)  holistic medicine humane to the core. The techniques used in holistic medicine are gentle, minimally invasive, and incorporate patient well-being and stress reduction. Holistic thinking is centered on love, empathy, and respect. Click on the link in this paragraph to learn more about this approach to Veterinary medicine.
  3.  Medications–some are not as safe as others in our opinion and experience. 20229379_10155028879813305_8042793045446538520_nRimadyl (carprofen) and its generic counterpart Novox Carprofen are something we are not comfortable using for the Weimaraner. You never know when it is going to have a serious adverse side effect–in our case and that of two other OwyheeStar clients experience it led to severe and uncontrollable seizures. There are alternative anti-inflammatory medications. Whenever possible, we recommend you avoid Rimadyl. If it becomes necessary, then try to reduce the dosage or get off it as soon as possible. To manage or to prevent this situation; however, requires that you advocate because it is most usually the go to drug of choice after surgery or when facing arthritic situations.
  4. No one food is right for every Weimaraner. A quality grain-free food is our suggestion, and we are not speaking about one of these premium brands that touts all kind of additives. We believe in adding a quality supplement in the right dosage and staying away from foods that claim they add these things. Why? You might ask. Well,  supplements get old, and even dog food needs to be fresh. Also, how do you know the quality of the additives? You don’t. Stick with the basic quality food and add something that is proven and has excellent quality control. Keep in mind, many of the Big Name Brands are not as high quality as you might think. Your pocketbook may not be able to afford a raw food diet, or the best dog food money can buy. You can provide basic quality food. The right food is apt to help them live longer.
  5. NuVet--we cannot say enough about this supplement. The only caution we have is for young pups. Too much of a good thing can be counterproductive. We suggest you follow our recommended protocol. A small amount of the NuVet powder sprinkled on the young Weimaraner’s food every day will make a big difference. It might take time to see results if you have existing problems, but there are many testimonials including the one we received last week from Mary.  (Click on the NuVet  link below to learn more about this supplement.)

    She writes. PS – when we got Olli we started both dogs on Nuvet. Rudi had horrible allergies but they steadily improved over the last 2 years to the point of not needing any medication. Coincidence?  I think not. We are sold on the benefits.

  6. Bloat is a complicated and somewhat mysterious life-threatening situation. We are going to refer you to an article (rather than addressing it ourselves).  Click Here to find out more about the risk of bloat, thank you!
  7. Insurance–the pros and cons of having it. We believe you should invest in some kind of major medical coverage. Eventually, the athletic Weimaraner is going to need extreme Veterinary or special care. Sometimes this happens early in life–a torn ACL, etc. There is the threat of bloat (as mentioned above) in this breed, too! We cannot speak to which insurance company pays the best. Our Vet Office has their favorite company because they say they pay quickly. Some people say that if you get the insurance up front that the first year is nearly a wash. Many policies cover the vaccine, general care and then you have the cost of the spay or the neuter. (Typically, there is a set allotted amount to cover basic visits in some of these policies–each one is different).
  8. Do your research, but keep in mind that many of these surgical procedures cost Crane's Lucy4$2,000 and up. Insurance doesn’t negate your personal responsibility. We might forget we are the gatekeeper and in the heat of the moment simply say do whatever is needed. Insurance means it might not be a cost consideration–in the midst of a crisis, your Weimaraner may receive medication that leads to other issues. Everyone just wants to trust their Vet to do what is right. We understand. Nevertheless, it is important to always keep in mind that they are treating all breeds and a lot of mutts. Each Veterinary fur client is important, but they are not all equally sensitive to certain vaccines, medication, etc.

Thank you, for doing the best by your Weimaraner. We appreciate every sacrifice made for our OwyheeStar offspring. We work with the best Weimlovers in the universe. How privileged we are!?!

The photos we added are not directly related to loss–just a reminder of what we value.

 

 

 

Elio

At 16 Weeks

Lorenzen's Elio June 23 2017Elio continues to be an absolute joy and an incredible addition to my little fur family!  He’s a calm, well-mannered puppy who picks up on things incredibly fast! We’re going into week 3 of puppy classes and he’s doing great! 🙂

Breeder Comment

Vaccine Crossroad

A Reminder to Proceed with Caution

The Sadie X Stackhouse Litter will celebrate their sixteen-week birthday on this coming Sunday (June 25th). That brings everyone to a crossroad. By now a lot has happened, and everyone will have found themselves insanely busy raising their Weimaraner. The Weimaraner’s (and the OwyheeStar) Vaccine Protocol can have been forgotten.

Your Veterinary office will have a different (broad-based) vaccine protocol. Even if they agree to follow the recommendations, it will fall on the pup’s owner to remember these details. We suggest putting the dates on your calendar and ignoring the Veterinary office alerts. Otherwise, it gets very confusing. If you have forgotten the protocol read on1

 

  • 6-Week NEOPAR® Puppy Shot(given at OwyheeStar)
  • 9-Week *Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • 12- Week *Nobivac Canine 1-DAPPv
  • Other vaccines such as Lepto and Kennel Cough (Bordatella) should be given as needed–and avoided when possible. We recommend not combining these shots with any other vaccine–, especially rabies. Vaccine challenges the immune system to build antibodies; therefore, we strongly encourage you to space Lepto, Bordetella, and Rabies vaccination at least two weeks apart. We realize that many veterinary practices give multiple vaccinations at a single visit; however, this approach is easier on the immune system. If a reaction does occur, then you know what caused it and plan to avoid it in the future. Yes, we understand this is a more costly approach–avoiding the risk is worth it!
  • 16-Week Crossroad <== Opt for the Vaccine Titer Test instead of automatically getting another puppy shot. Your Vet is going to recommend just doing the shot because that is typical for the all-breed approach; however, a percentage of Weims are vaccine sensitive. Although your pup probably never had a reaction before, please do not ignore this warning. Even a mild vaccine reaction can trigger immune system issues–some of these lead to on-going health problems and in certain instances death. It is not worth the risk! The vaccine titer test runs more than double the cost of the typical puppy shot, but it might save you thousands over time as well as the potential heartache. Almost without exception, our protocol has been producing immunity by week sixteen, which means your puppy doesn’t need any more essential vaccine. If you need the optional vaccines (Bordetella or Lepto) these can be done; however, please space them at least two weeks apart from the Rabies.
  • Vaccine Blog Post   For the OwyheeStar Client Only click here! (requires password)

PUPPY VACCINE CLARIFICATION (Lepto)

There is a significant push by the Veterinary community (due to the recent rise of Lepto) to include Lepto in the puppy shot. The Weimaraner Club of America (as well as others who study this breed) recommend you wait to give the Lepto, etc. until the puppy shots are completed. The puppy shot should not include Lepto or Corona. No other vaccine should be combined with the puppy shot. Waiting for the Lepto, Bordetella, and another vaccine until the pup is a little older is less risky. It takes more effort and costs a bit more to space the vaccine, but is worth it.

What is the DAPPv?

Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 1 (Hepatitis), Adenovirus Type 2 (Respiratory Disease), Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus (Click Here to read more about the vaccine we use. Remember the Puppy Shot should not contain the Lepto or Corona.

OwyheeStar Disclaimer

The Weimaraner Club of America (WCA) Vaccine Protocol

We are neither Licensed Veterinarians nor Licensed Veterinary Techs. Our recommendations are based on twenty-plus years breeding the Weimaraner (exclusively) as well as the breed recommendation (from the Weimaraner Club of America). Ultimately, you have to decide what is the best approach. This protocol is considered a more Holistic and safer approach. That being said, our advice cannot replace that of your Veterinary of choice. 

Insurance

Consider This!

_Rhune's Kula Bleu _1280px[1]The price quotes below are just a sample of what can go wrong. We have heard quotes hovering around the $ 4,000 mark for some procedures–for example, GVD intervention. Bloat can be sudden and is always an emergency. The Weimaraner is one of the targeted breeds for this horrendous life-threatening health issue. Click here to read more. As with humans, there are the typical ailments that can come and rob us of time. We want to eke out as much time together as is possible; insurance can help us get more.

The athletic Weimaraner can suffer a torn or ruptured ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). Possibly if one side goes, then the other will too–according to the experts. Joint replacement is possible. If this happens, you want to be able to take care of your fur family member and best friend.

We don’t make a fee if you sign up for insurance this or other insurance. AKC doesn’t have the only gig in town. Our Vet office prefers Pets Best, but they have had a result with other insurances as well as the AKC recommended.

We received this from AKC

Thanks to amazing advances in veterinary medicine, treatment for your pet’s accidents and illnesses are more successful today – but often at a high cost.

Below is a list of claims paid to our current policyholders. As you can see, it can be expensive to keep our pets healthy! Luckily our pet insurance can help keep costs down for a low monthly premium.

 

Breed Accident/Illness State Total Cost Amount Paid
Old English Sheep Dog Lymphoma TX $1,290 $1,003
Doberman Pinscher Cruciate Tear CA $2,800 $2,202
Beagle Foreign Body Ingestion NC $1,988 $1,500
Bichon Frise Bladder Stones NY $1,301 $1,010

You probably received this from AKC too! We suggest that checking into Major Medical Coverage for your beloved Weimaraner. You don’t want their life cut short, nor for them to have to limp along with a career ending injury. All too soon the end will stare you in the face. All this goodness last but a season it seems.

Hank

At Nearly 8 Years

Shaub Hank 2017-2It has been ages since we have checked in with you, but our Hank continues to do well. He will be 8 this summer and is finally starting to slow down.

Gentle BabysitterShaub's Hank Babysitter-3

He has been remarkably gentle with our two boys, who joined the family after he did (ages 4 and 3 months). I’ve attached a pic of him inspecting our new addition, as well as one where he is doing what he does best (taking up room on the couch) 🙂

Question

We had a question we wanted to run by you since you’ve surely run into almost everything with this breed. Hank was just diagnosed with a cranial cruciate ligament tear in his hind leg and we are headed down the surgical road. $$$ Is this something you have seen in the past? Just wondering if you had any insight.
Thanks again for laying the groundwork for our fabulous pup!
Regards, Will and Suzanna

Breeder Comment

Sorry to hear that Hank has developed the ligament tear. Although a large percentage of our Weims avoid this type of situation, it is not all that unheard of for the athletic Weimaraner. Nursing such an injury (even with surgery which is costly) requires a lot of patience. They take a considerable amount of time to heal. It begs the question of how you will keep them from running?

With the rising Veterinary costs, surgery can be costly. We suggest investing in Major Medical for the unforeseen situation such as the ligament tear. There are many other situations that could also require extreme care such as bloat. The aging Weimaraner, like the senior human, will most likely face some medical challenges. Who doesn’t want to be able to give them the best Holistic care possible?

Finally, we sincerely thank you for the lovely update. We especially love the photos. We appreciate everything you have done for and with Hank. We are glad he made a good transition as your family expanded. It speaks volumes for the on-going socialization you provided.

Exhausting

A Tired Weim is a Good Weim

       ~Thank God, it’s Friday!

 

Garin's Luna Exhausting_1330

“Woof!” I tell you something, being good is exhausting!

 

Seriously, that saying is one that is commonplace. It has merit. With the high-energy young Weimaraner, you may find yourself challenged to find age appropriate exercise ideas.

Consider Caution 

Seriously, that saying (about how exhaustion is directly related to the Weim’s behavior) is one that is commonplace. It has merit. With the high-energy young Weimaraner, you may find yourself challenged to find age appropriate exercise ideas. For the long distance runner, the obvious seems to be to hit the trails. Nevertheless, caution is in order. If you are a serious athlete (who goes the distance), you want to get longevity from your Weim’s hips and joints. Therefore, you need to be careful not to overrun the pup’s development and growth–their growth plates do not close until about 15 months. That is a sobering thought.

Other Considerations

Age-appropriate exercise is up for interpretation–like all things subjective. Nevertheless, the high-impact frisbee, agility-type activity, and distances of more than 3 miles should be limited. The latter is most important if the run is on the pavement; however, even pounding the dirt trail can be damaging to those developing joints. We have always suggested you set the Weimaraner up for the longer distances once they are done growing by making better choices–swimming is a favorite. The high-energy Weimaraner can always benefit from being able to water retrieve. Long after the growth plates have closed they will have plenty of energy. If they love to fetch and swim this will be a plus in so many ways.

Insurance

Insurance for your Weimaraner is a good idea–at least major medical. This is especially true for the serious athlete. A torn ACL is expensive to surgically repair. It is said if a ligament problem develops on the left side, the other side may also suffer the same fate. There are other injuries that are equally expensive to treat. Lurking in the background is the risk of bloat–thank goodness, we have only known of a couple of cases in the OwyheeStar Weims. Nevertheless, it is always a risk with this breed. It is also very costly to treat. Should it strike, it is an emergency situation–which may not end well. No one can guarantee such a fate will not visit your household, but to have it do so would (most assuredly) mean to wish you had gotten the insurance.

The Weimaraner can go the distance once they have finished growing. Your faithful running companion should be by your side for a goodly number of years. Consider that hip replacement and other repairs are an option. You might check the insurance to see what it covers and discuss this with your Veterinary office professionals. The person that does the billing will know which insurance pays best and typically have a recommendation.

Luna– does it all!

13529143_1262289560478659_3909295587421553350_nLuna, pictured above and at the top, has many favored activities on land as well as water. She does it all. She is kid friendly and the hostess with the mostest (if you know what we mean). To say she is popular would be a vast understatement. Her life is indeed exhausting. She has a myriad of responsibilities that is mind-boggling. We thank her for all she does for her family and others.

 

 

 

 

 

Beautiful Outdoors

In Boise

         ~ Eagle Island

16716198_10212068926103503_4489018754066793968_o

Trigger and Mom on the trail again. 

Natalie Writes–I used to mourn my running days. But today, I won’t take a second for granted! The beautiful sunshine, my four-legged company, and the fact that I can walk. 

 

Dusty

Dusty has a Job

dusty-for-chewy-com_0587He has been practicing his product presentation. He was particularly happy with himself when it came to Fortiflora and Zukes Minis

If you have been to the Vet for antibiotics or vaccine now is the time to add some good bacteria to your Weim’s gut. It would even be better to add some just before the vaccine. There are many times when the addition of some bacteria is a good idea. fortifloraYogurt (with live cultures) can be an option; however, it doesn’t come close to offering the same outcome. Keep this on your shelf. Click here to purchase from Chewy.com.

  • Helps reduce flatulence (gas) in dogs and contains 100 Million live microorganisms
  • Proven to promote intestinal health & balance with microencapsulated probiotics, which guarantees that they arrive alive in your pet’s digestive tract
  • Contains antioxidant vitamins E, C and beta-carotene which have been shown to support a strong immune system
  • Tastes great, has excellent palatability and may even increase a pet’s desire to eat
  • Easy to feed – just sprinkle on your pet’s food

 

Thanksgiving 2016

Celebrate

       ~ Please Keep In Mind

10703995_10203865392493285_2238146014813983610_n (1)We send you the warmest of greetings. Thank you for your faithful friendship. We value our relationship. It is the season to give thanks and to remember all we have to celebrate.

  1. We are thankful for our family.
  2. We are thankful for the life we can lead–thank you to those who made this possible. (veterans, and those who paid the ultimate sacrifice–including their families).
  3. We are thankful to our God for his provision
  4. We are thankful for our friends, and clients–many times they are one in the same.

Today–it will find many of you traveling, or scurrying to make-ready. We, likewise, have things associated with the Thanksgiving holiday to prepare for as well as our usual daily hoopla. We cannot omit the fact that we are thankful for the Weimaraner. This fact goes without saying. It speaks to the heart of our life; these wonderful fur family members are those who bring a smile to so many people every day.

 Preventing the Unthinkable

The last thing any of us want is a trip to the emergency room (albeit for a human, or the Weimaraner). This scenario is never truer than in the midst of a holiday. Unfortunately, this is a time when we can become distracted for a moment, or miss what is happening. It is hard to keep an eye on all the well-meaning guests who want to sneak a tidbit to the Weim, or the plates left unattended. Here are some things to keep forefront in your mind during our celebration.

  1. Counter-surfing — it takes a moment, and they have snatched it.
  2. Trash-raiding — make sure it is Weimaraner safe. Ingested cooked turkey bones, foil, string, and a myriad of other items can lead to emergency surgery.
  3. Skip the bones entirely — you might want to treat them, but things can go awry.
  4. Table scraps need to be carefully monitored. With guests sneaking them a bit here and there, it can easily get out of control. These rich additions can upset their tummy, or trigger a more severe condition. For example, the turkey skin might seem harmless, but the fatty morsel (or too much human food in general) could trigger a pancreatic attack. Weims tend to have a sensitive tummy; however, the important thing is to remember a dog cannot handle all this fatty and calorie-laden holiday food (or the trimmings). The best approach would be to set a dish of allowed scraps and tell people they must not have any more than what is on the plate. This strategy may not prevent the well-meaning guest from giving them the forbidden.
  5. Ingested rising bread or roll dough stories abound on the Internet. Yes, it does pose a danger. Cake, and yeasty bread batter when ingested, expands rapidly in the dog’s gut.
  6. The dangers are not limited to what we plan to eat. Remember the risk includes candles, cut flowers, alcohol, potpourri, etc.
  7. Finally, do not forget about things like sugarless gum, candy, etc. The Weimaraner is opportunistic, and they can find a jelly bean at the bottom of someone’s handbag.

Manners and Your Guests

Respect is a two-way street. Some Weimaraners will jump up, and they do it playfully. They may like to nibble or corn-bite as some call it, or even nip when they get excited. Their toenails could catch grandma’s skin, and cause an unintentional dangerous scratch–looking like an encounter with a knife. They could knock a child or unstable person to the ground. Even the well-mannered dog could be playing, and someone could catch a tooth. Unfortunately, this can lead to serious problems–a trip to the emergency room, reports filed, and people making accusations about your Weimaraner. Another side of the issue is you don’t know what someone is doing to the Weimaraner when you are not looking. Things can go awry in fast order if the family pet becomes challenged, afraid, or territorial. Make every effort to avoid these situations. It is not unthinkable to use a crate–when you cannot be in control of the situation. The saying– it is better safe than sorry is true.

We cannot say what is the best situation for you, and your gathering. We suggest you proceed with caution. The crate-trained Weimaraner might be safer in their den. Putting them out in the yard, while everyone is inside can also cause issues. The Weimaraner is like a child who never grows up. The high energy filled Weimaraner doesn’t stand down. The aroma stimulates and fuels their excitement. Ultimately, we all want them to be a huge part of everything we do. They require supervision. 

The Weimaraner is part of your family. You must plan for them like everyone else. Thank you for remembering that during this holiday season.

 

Traveling and Whatnot

With Roy

      ~First a Question!

Just wondering if you know of any websites that would be posting stuff about local Kennel Cough  outbreaks?? Roy has had all his pup shots and is scheduled to get his kennel cough nasal drips at 16 weeks and will be getting his rabies around 22 weeks.

Breeder Reply

Hello, Megan! No, I don’t know of any online resource that posts pet viral outbreaks. I think mostly, dog professionals stay up on this — Vet offices, Dog Trainers, Boarding Facilities, and those associated with the task of Dog Park Management. Maybe if there is such a thing in and around the Pacific NW someone will leave a comment.

We feel you are doing the shots the way they should be done for the Weimaraner. If you are going to be out and about, getting the kennel cough protection is wise. Since it is not a long-lived protection and the problem seems to rise in the late fall to winter time frame, getting one later in the year seems to be a wise choice. We are happy to see Roy is doing well. Thank you so much for taking good care of him.

Progress 

He’s doing great, we learned to “shake” this week. He is eager to please 😉 (more like get a biscuit!)

The Social Butterflyimage4

Roy 7.21.2016-Portland-2We went on a road trip through Idaho, Wyoming, and Montana. We’re actually just heading home. Roy is a social butterfly, in fact, he actually seems really offended if someone walks by and doesn’t acknowledge him. So funny the compliments we get one lady said he was “… Kinda of an iridescent color if you will”  

He is my little shadow, I never go anywhere and don’t feel his eyes on me. Nick is jealous!

Ready for adventure!

               ~Wyoming mornings are cold!

Here he is in Idaho at Anderson ranch reservoir. I didn’t get a picture with him wearing his yellow life jacket. Turns out he loves swimming, just not in the pool at home!

He loves the Water!

We have taken him on another adventure since the three state roundabout. Above Roy is pictured with me. It was a lot warmer on the Pontoon Boat in Portland. Roy 7.21.2016-Portland-1

Dog Park

Fun and Yet…

The AKC has an article on the ailment known a Kennel Cough (also known as canine infectious tracheobronchitis).

What Is Kennel Cough?

Kennel Cough (also known as canine infectious tracheobronchitis) is a highly contagious respiratory disease. Dogs commonly contract kennel cough at places where large amounts of canines congregate, such as boarding and daycare facilities, dog parks, training groups, and dog shows. Dogs can spread it to one another through airborne droplets, direct contact (e.g., touching noses), or contaminated surfaces (including water/food bowls). It’s highly treatable in most dogs but can be more severe in puppies younger than six months of age and immunocompromised dogs.

Should You Use the Dog Park?

IMG_2996Recently, we heard about a young OwyheeStar Weimaraner who has a severe case of Kennel Cough which is now progressed to full blown pneumonia. The Veterinarian said the pup caught the disease at the dog park. Who knows for sure; however, this is a highly contagious and easily contracted upper respiratory affliction. No one wants to think their pup caught this disease because they took them where they got infected.

The dog park is not the most likely place to catch this virus. The more likely place would be somewhere indoors — the vet office, the training facility, etc. When you are frequenting places where the dog population is larger, you need to vaccinate against this virus.

About the Vaccine 

We hold to the same recommendations as the Weimaraner Club of America. This vaccine should be given after the core vaccines are completed and not combined with any other shot–such as Rabies, or a puppy shot). Whenever possible, space it two weeks apart from all other vaccines. This vaccine like the puppy shot can be a trigger–open the door for immune system issues. This type of reaction is best avoided. By following these suggestions, you avoid over-taxing the immune system. It should also be noted, that this particular vaccine develops protection more quickly than the typical puppy shot which takes two weeks to develop full immunity.

It is also important to remember that the Kennel Cough protection doesn’t necessarily last a year. Even though you get the vaccine (which is either injected or given nasally), it doesn’t guarantee you are protected or provide continuous protection. Consider getting protection when the risk is at the highest. For example, if there is a local outbreak–this is one time when you are most at risk in your dog park. Also, consider it when you are thinking of boarding, attending classes, or joining in with a group of dogs for an event.

Final Thought

When we think of Kennel Cough, we general think of contracting it at an enclosed facility. There is less risk in the open environment—it seems infecting your Weimaraner would (almost always) require a direct encounter with the infected counterpart. The grass and surfaces might get contaminated; however, the virus would not last long.  In contrast, the Parvovirus can infect the ground for months. This upper respiratory viral infection is not as persistent or enduring–it is more of a direct contact type of thing.  Therefore, take caution when thinking about taking your young Weimaraner to places dogs frequent–vet offices, pet stores, indoor facilities, and pet areas. The more dogs, the more risk there is of contracting any number of infections.

Vet offices are vigilant about sanitation; however, you are always at risk of exposure. Someone walking into the reception area with a Parvo or the Kennel cough infected dog can easily infect the immediate area–and pass it to your pet. For this reason, some veterinary clinics offer the two-door access. These facilities have a wellness entrance and a separate entrance for pets who are ill. Isn’t that a great idea?

It should be noted

Neither Cliff nor Shela is a licensed Veterinary Technicians or Veterinarian. This is our thoughts on this topic based on experience.