Blog Archives

Shed Hunting

~ Brandon With Toby

Toby is going to be a good one. He is doing amazing at the Shed Hunting. Our hours of training paid off.

Breeder Comment

The Weimaraner is listed as one of the best Shed-hunting breeds. Shed Hunting is a fast growing sport, but much of what it requires for hunting upland game birds, will crossover to training a good shed hunter. The nose and the love of the finding the sheds are the foundation. Want to find out more–check out these links!

Shed Hunting Weims (this is an older post– some links might not still work)

How to Shed Hunt with your Dog

Starting Your Dog Out the Right Way

Shed Hunting with Dogs

Thanks to Brandon for remembering us with this photo and the news that Toby is already a successful shed hunter. Good job, Brandon.

My Two OwyheeStars

Sheds, Upland Game Birds–

All Around CompanionWeims

Bailee does good with upland game birds and great with sheds.  She used to love the water until my adopted weim, Abel (which we lost in February) convinced Bailee that water is scary.  I am still working with her to get her back into it.  She loves going out hunting with me, and no matter what I’m out hunting for, she seems to find a shed 🙂 

She also likes to go fishing with me whether it be in the boat, or on the paddle board.  

Not Abel, my old buddy–tell me again why we need this guy?

When we lost Abel, Bailee was very depressed and even gained some weight.  But since adding Bodey to the mix, she is hyper and back to herself again.  As you can see in this pic, she was not impressed initially (lol), but she warmed up quickly.  Bodey keeps her busy with constant tug of war with the chew toys and always stealing her antlers cause his just aren’t as interesting.  They are inseparable. 

Bodey is picking up smaller sheds and I think he will do well this season.  I’ve got him to bark at the sheds that are too large for him to pick up which I have never got Bailee to do, so I’m excited about that.  

And of course, they are both professional Grade cuddlers.  They are both crate trained and LOVE their kennel, but they typically sleep on my bed with me.  If they aren’t on my bed cuddled with me, they are in their crate with the door wide open curled up with each other 🙂 

Look At Me Now!

 

Bodey has been such an incredible addition for Bailee and me, thanks for raising such great pups! 🙂 ~ Damon

Breeder Comment

Honestly, I have a very difficult time getting updates from my hunter-type guys. Well, you know—they would rather do almost anything else. I get it.

I am sure you can work her back into the water—Weims get an idea, and it is tough to change their mind but if you act like water is the norm and work he back into it with the retrieve I think you can do this one thing. Bless you, my friend. I do so hope that Brandon follows through. I would be excited to place a puppy with him as well.

Maggie

~ We Celebrate 5 Years in December

Just wanted to send the yearly photos of our Maggie who turned 5 12/19.  Still bringing us lots of happiness and joy!  Our boys love to get her all riled up when they hide her ball. Too bad their hiding skills are no match for her nose!  

We have also started to teach her how to find sheds.  She is so smart!  Anytime you say “let’s go” or “bird” or “duck” her ears perk right up.  She still loves to cuddle with the cat.  Phil and I can barely get our running shoes tied and she already is standing at the front door!    The neighbors think it is pretty cool that we have her hold her own leash on our walks……Can’t imagine our lives without her.

One more thing….we take her collar off at night and in the morning we tell her to “go get her clothes” and she brings us her collar….She’s so much fun!


Hope all is well with you!Phil and Gretchen

Breeder Comment

Thank you, for another update on Maggie and her life with you. She looks so happy–glad you love her so much.

Lucy and Toby

Has been a while since I shared anything. Toby and Lucy are doing great!
The two shed pics are Lucy’s last week and a pretty funny one of Toby’s very first she’d find!  It’s a beauty. Had a good laugh in the forest at that one!  Do t worry, you’ll catch up to Lucy someday!


The picture of the rock behind them. That was about 15’ high and straight up and down and I wouldn’t have believed it if I didn’t see it myself; Toby ran straight up it like a billy goat and then Lucy followed and I had to run and catch her when she fell back.  The look on to Toby’s face was right after that. Tell me a dog doesn’t have a personality!


Who doesn’t like car rides and sometimes we get to share the front seat!

Love the first snowfall of the season. 


We even get to help dad with the firewood. 

Out of the two, Lucy has the best nose and Toby’s the most athletic. He must put 25% more miles. Sure is wonderful having two energetic and cuddly furries again!
Have a Merry Christmas!

Breeder Comment

We are so happy to hear news of Toby and Lucy. They look fabulous–like they are enjoying life. What a great share. It gives people a feel for what it can be like. There is nothing we can say other than seeing the Weims involved in the family activities brings us joy. Thank You–Merry Christmas to you and the Weim kids.

PS: We love your smiling Weimar photo–Toby you are adorable.

The Early Stage

Our Maelee

~Enjoying Life

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She loves playtime with the kids, fetching & retrieving every day. Introduced her to the sheds, though we’ll wait a little longer due to height and she can still be a bit clumsy at times.

She is very smart & likes to test us (repetition is key); we’ve used hand signals along with voice commands throughout her training (helpful for hunting later on, we prefer this method over whistle training). Overall she is very loved, happy, healthy and has made her place in our hearts. We look forward to every new adventure, and with our very active family, she has much to look forward, too!

3116Training is going great! 1st time playing in the sand this week, too!

Breeder Comment

We love the photo documentation. Thanks for that! We love seeing she is working at the Versatile lifestyle thing–all terrain Weimar.

Toby Reports

IMG_4985Hi guys! Toby here!
I’m sorry it’s been a long time since I checked in, but I’ve been having so much fun, I lost track of the time!

Lucy and I get to go play in the snow most days. We love it when we can run to our heart’s content!

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Don’t worry about my big ears, they never get in my way when I’m having fun!
Did you know we can smell deer tracks through the snow!!!
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I get to hang out in the shop sometimes…if I’m a good boy and don’t chew on the “good wood”…whatever that means, it’s all good to me! Max just hangs out. He’s boring.
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You don’t have to worry, I always have someone to snuggle with. Lucy takes good care of me. She loves to lick my ears and belly!
I’m up to 38lbs now. Mom says that means I’m a big boy!!
Not as big as Max, though. He used to be 85lb but since he’s boring now, he’s only 79lb. He still loves the snow though!
We had a great Christmas! Santa brought us toys and treats for being good pups!
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Santa doesn’t know about some of the mischievous things we do, so don’t tell him!
There are lots of deer here. Lucy loves to chase them but I’d rather stay close to mom. We watch them out the window a lot.
And when we go on hikes, Lucy finds their trails and brings home good things to chew on!
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I’m very easy going. I love my tummy to be rubbed or licked by Lucy. She’s always “mothering” me.
We hope you guys are well and will have good litters of pups this year.
Until next time…Love,
Toby (and Lucy, Max, Jeff , and Melissa)

Hazey Skye Daze

The girls have been growing up and changing like crazy over the last 6 months. Skye will be 2 years old on May 31, and Haze will be 2 years old on July 31.

Both girls regularly attend classes at our dog club. We usually have them enrolled in at least 2 different types of classes each week. The current term classes are Agility Foundation and Advanced Rally. Skye also is involved in the newer sport of Nose Work. Nancy is hoping to gear Haze towards shed hunting which she will work with Haze on her own.

We take the dogs most everywhere with us, although we do make sure they are left at home periodically so that they learn it’s ok to not be with us all the time. When in the house alone, the girls are crated if no one will be there for more than an hour. So far, they have shown no real signs of separation anxiety, although for the first few minutes when we leave, they anxiously hope they get to go by watching out the window. If not, they eventually go lay down staying quiet until we return. We are still constantly working on good manners for greeting new people and other dogs as they get so excited. The girls definitely keep us on our toes, but we can’t imagine life without them. They are so funny and interactive. They love to get dressed up and are curious about everything, which makes for great adventures.

Skye still feels that she controls all things at all times, although as she has become older, her need to control all things shift usually ends by 8 pm, as she disappears and going to bed on her own.

The girls have also been the inspiration for our new logo for our business Action Animal Pet Care & Dog Training. Untitled

Cabin Fever Cure

258Trail is a shed-hunter. These cast-0ffs are found throughout Oregon; and other areas where wildlife are prolific. The Department of Oregon Fish and Wildlife has published an article on how to be a responsible collector of sheds–click here, for more information.

SALEM, Ore.—This time of year isn’t just for Easter egg hunting. Many Oregonians are in the outdoors looking for another seasonal treat– shed antlers.

Oregon’s male deer and elk naturally shed their antlers at this time of year (only to regrow them in spring and summer). Buck deer usually shed theirs from late December through March, and bull elk from late February through early April.

Rob Tanner, co-founder of Oregon Shed Hunters, believes more people are enjoying the sport of shed hunting. “We are noticing more people getting out, but the clientele has changed a bit,” he says. “It’s no longer just hardcore hunters; nowadays it’s more of a family event with mom, dad, kids and even pets out shed hunting.”

But the peak of shed hunting season in late winter/early spring also coincides with tougher weather and less forage availability for big game, making it a vulnerable time for wildlife. Shed hunters using motor vehicles can put wildlife on the move when these animals need to be conserving valuable energy reserves. Pets and people on foot or horseback can also disturb big game.

Wildlife biologists have real concerns about the sport’s impact on big game, especially when it’s not practiced responsibly. “Shed hunters and their dogs can pressure, stress and exclude deer from the very ground that was set aside to help them survive the winter,” said Chase Brown, assistant district wildlife biologist in The Dalles.

While this year’s mild winter has made conditions easier for big game, it could also mean they get disturbed more than usual. “The mild winter had made access easy this year, so shed hunters can go into more remote places,” says Mark Kirsch, Umatilla District wildlife biologist. Kirsch cites resource damage (from vehicles using unimproved roads or going cross country), gates left open, trespassing and movement of animals to private agricultural land where they cause damage as some common problems seen from unethical shed hunting.

Shed hunters can take the following steps to protect big game while still enjoying their sport:

  • Don’t disturb big game animals: Don’t approach animals or follow the same ones on a daily basis.
  • Respect road and area closures. These are in place to protect winter range and wintering big game. Some ODFW wildlife areas are entirely closed to public access during late winter; other areas have road and travel restrictions. More information on specific closures below or see the 2015 Oregon Big Game Regulations.
  • Don’t take vehicles off-roading. The ground is water-logged at this time of year and off-roading in the wrong place can damage critical wildlife and fish habitat. Travel by foot or horseback instead.
  • Shed Antler
    Kellen Tanner with a shed antler.
    Photo courtesy of Rob Tanner.

    Don’t be in the same spot every day. Deer and elk might need to be in that spot for food or cover, and your presence will keep them from it.

  • Keep dogs under your control. Don’t let dogs approach or follow wildlife. State law prohibits dogs (and people) from harassing wildlife. (ORS 498.102 and 498.006)
  • Don’t trespass on private property. You always need permission to be on private land. Antlers that are shed on private land below to the landowner under Oregon statutes.

Monitoring winter range closures and travel restrictions are a priority for Oregon State Police at this time of year. OSP patrols winter range closures and travel management areas by air and by vehicle.

More about antlers

Antlers are the fastest-growing bone that isn’t cancerous or prenatal. Antlers on deer can grow at a rate up to seven times that of skeletal growth. Elk antlers can weigh 30-40 pounds.

Elk antlers begin re-growing soon after they are shed, with most growth happening in spring and summer months. The antlers are covered by “velvet” throughout this growth period, before hardening to bone in late July-early August for elk and late August-early September for deer. This makes antlers ready in time for breeding season (in September for elk and November for deer), when male deer or elk will fight for dominance using their antlers.

Oregon Big Game Regulations (page 22) state that “No person shall possess or transport any game mammal or part thereof which has been illegally killed, found or killed for humane reasons, except shed antlers, unless they have notified and received permission from personnel of the Oregon State Police or ODFW prior to transporting.” So people may pick up naturally shed antlers in the outdoors, but may not pick up skulls with antlers attached without permission.

People who collect shed antlers are allowed to sell or exchange them, but certain rules apply. Only naturally shed antlers, antlers detached from the skull, or a skull split apart can be sold or exchanged. For antlers detached from the skull or skulls split apart, the seller must have legally taken the game part (e.g. on a big game tag or after receiving permission from OSP or ODFW to remove skull and antlers from the wild in the first place.)

Past poaching problems led to the regulations. Skulls that are split have less value and are not eligible for record books. These regulations reduce the incentive for someone to kill animals on winter range or out of season, hide the skull, and go back months later and “find it”. A Hide/Antler Dealer permit ($17) is needed to purchase antlers for use in the manufacture of handcrafted items.

New Family; New Name

Maddy, Formerly Known As Coco finds a Job…imageCoco is AMAZING!!

She is now known as Maddalen Rose “Maddy”.  She is the sweetest little girl!  She has dug a great big hole full of love in our hearts.

She has had a couple minor accidents in the house and is getting closer everyday to being house trained.  When Bobby and she go to bed at night Maddy snuggles up on the bed and falls right to sleep and stays there all night.  Just the perfect little girl.  We are so lucky that you allowed us to be her new forever family.

Training for Shed Hunting…