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ReHomed–Part One

Thanks to Kirsten

~And the Entire Family

Greene's Rocky and Mickey_0646

Mickey (left) and Rocky (front right) in Boise

Finding A Home

You probably have been following the rehoming of Rocky and Mickey–two Blue OwyheeStar Females who needed to relocate. Their family situation took a turn that meant there was no one left home for them. That is never a good thing–especially when the Weimaraner is used to a different scenario. We all know this situation can unfold. So, Ned contacted me for help. Of course, we were glad to be able to assist in the finding of another home, but that being said, there are two. We needed a certain kind of home to ensure a good transition.

Inquiries

We had a whirlwind of inquiries. Mark and Robin had desperately wanted to bring them to their Southern Oregon home. It looked like it might work; however, upon pondering the situation, it seemed a bit too much for their very senior ‘Jet.’ Barbara (from Texas) was willing to come to get them, also. There again, she and her husband are longtime Weimaraner folks with experience at rehoming the Weimaraner. In the end, Kirsten was interested, and since the other placements didn’t come together, she and her family agreed to incorporate them into their home. They have an OwyheeStar (Desi). As the others mentioned they have rescued and had the breed for a very long time–they understand the work involved as well as the implications.

Rock-solid Placement

When getting the Weimaraner (or two Weims) the second family, it is essential to find a rock-solid situation. Multiple moves never work well. We are confident that Rocky and Mickey have found a fabulous home. I know everyone rejoices with us.

Baker City_1377.jpegThe Hand Off

We met Kirsten a little over a week ago in Baker City. The two had traveled first from Boise to our home, where they spent the night. Everything went better than we could have hoped. They parked themselves with the Weim-porch group. They did as the others did acting as if this was all the norm. It was not. Nevertheless, they adapted which is impressive.

Boyd's RockyThen they must have wondered when we loaded up again. Mickey settled in the back and Rocky clung next to us kissing us and nudging our ear–taking turns between Cliff and I. So, it is not surprising that the same situation began as Kirsten loaded and headed back to the Portland area. Rocky like to kiss a lot. Mickey is equally loving but not as driven.

None of this is news to those of you following the rehoming situation. Of course, we know Kirsten has three Weims all vying for time and attention. Well, I must admit when you have a demanding job this is the best kind of therapy. I know you understand what I mean.

 

Note: Thanks to Ned for trusting us to do right by his beloved girls.

 

Watch for Part Two–Coming Soon!

 

 

Heartwarming

Gio’s Story

~AKA Captain Cadaver

IMG_5649Breeder Comment: Our contract states that if a person cannot keep their Weimaraner, they need to return them to us. That being said–sometimes unfortunate circumstances engulfs a person. It would be unkind to point the blame at someone who fell on hard times. In this situation, this OwyheeStar Weimar found the ultimate placement. We appreciate hearing from the family and what they have done for the OwyheeStar offspring. Read on to learn more. And heartfelt thanks to this family–we appreciate you!

The Beginning 

We adopted Gio back in 2011/ son of Blue from your breeding program. He’s now 7/ 8 as of 10/10/18.

The first year was a bit rough, he was a bull-headed pup who wasn’t sure how anyone could be considered more important than him-Be they dog or human. Every year with this boy has been a gentle ease into being an extremely loving family dog! He’s an amazing athlete- loves running with us while we mountain bike or ATV. His most comical trait has been earning the title Captain Cadaver! He finds bones & body parts wherever we ride or walk. He must have an excellent nose. I feel guilty for not getting him into search & rescue.

Via Oregon Weimaraner Rescue

He came to us via Oregon Weimaraner Rescue. His owners lost their home & livelihood back in the crash of 2008. We were volunteers for a Weim rescue waiting for our big blue to come in, it took three years before the right guy came along. All that said- we wanted to get in touch with you to let you know how great and beautifully your blue boy is doing and how loved he is, two to make sure that when there is a need in our small pack we know where to find another one similar to him.

He was never a true rescue situation in that there was no pressure to hurry and place him, they wanted verification that he was going to a qualified loving family before letting him go. The couple, from what I understand, lost their employment and home. They were trying to make it work keeping him and living with their parents and their parents 5 Pomeranians, but it was chaos.

Our Gio

     ~ Our Story

To this day Gio/Yeager gravitates to those small fluffy dogs like- let’s be friends- they look at him & his 93-pound body like is he out of his mind. I just wanted to contact you to let you know a positive story of one of your pups and what a full and wonderful life he is leading. We live on a 5-acre farm in South Salem, he loves joining us for feeding the chickens, ducks, sheep, and goats. He is amazing a following us on mountain bikes, running, or riding or swimming next to paddle boards.

The thought of not having him in our life is depressing. Our close friends just lost their two big boys to cancer last weekend and it makes you scared to imagine life without such a great friend by your side. Hence, here I am establishing contact with you and making sure there is a chance to find a boy similar to him someday again. As of now, he’s healthy and by my side, most of the day and that’s the way we like it :O)

Side Notes

**The couple who gave him up were friends with one of the staff of Weim rescue and she vetted us extensively. She knew we were athletes, I worked at home, had Weim experience, and knew what we were getting into and that he was a prize of a rescue dog. I contacted the woman who volunteered for Weim Rescue to get his info to contact you. She mentioned that he was a son of Blue.

**Having a papered dog is not really important to us.  During our time with rescue, we helped place and transported close to 20 dogs in just a few years. I know that’s not epic, but it gives you an idea of us looking for a good fit for our family while trying to fit people with the right Weims for their families. BTW I loved your note on explaining how some people are Weim people and some just aren’t- it was comically honest yet beautifully written!

Adventures with Tripp

My Friend

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Tripp is an amazing and truly wonderful dog. (LOL) Although I sometimes, (most of the time) I think he thinks he’s a person. I’m sure this is partially my fault. I treat him like he’s a little person. Tripp has been so good for me in many ways. He’s allowed me to learn how to be alone and to still do the things I really enjoy. We’ve enjoyed taking many trips–just the two of us– me and Tripp.

The Oregon Coast

We’ve been to the coast many times–several have been in the last few months. We also went to the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness Area. It seems like you are on top of the world, (lol) Well, maybe not the top of the world, but you find yourself at the top  of a mountain. Travels also include Bolan Mountain and the Steens Mountain.  I can honestly say that without Tripp, I never would have been able to to take these getaways. With him (my Weimaraner, Tripp)  I’m never alone. It is so amazing all the things that we explore together.

Together 

I love that while are just hanging out at home, he’s totally a goofball. Have you heard of the game of Twister? Tripp makes a habit of twisting himself into the weirdest position ever. He does this so he can squeeze in next to me on the chair. When it’s time for breakfast or dinner he’s so excited he tap dances and goes in circles. He truly has a unique and loving personality. Oh, when I take him into a store, he’s a complete ham. This Weimaraner really know’s how to put on a show. Together we make a great pair and I couldn’t imagine my life without him 🙂

Breeder’s Comment: Tripp is one of those Weimaraners who got a second chance placement. The problem (of needing a new home) was not his doing. Here is a previous update if you care to read it tooclick here.

Boundaries

The Weimaraner needs them!

Potential pitfalls are a good topic for discussion. The groundwork for many a major issue is laid by setting unclear boundaries, or the failure to establish any limit; some folks don’t realize how important it is until it is difficult to make a relationship change. Lucky July 29 2014-16You the human-element are the one setting the gold-standard for what is acceptable in your relationship. Nevertheless, it is wise to realize the Weimaraner is always mulling over their plan to gain more territory. How dangerous is this for your relationship, and their future in your home? We feel this is a very serious topic of discussion.

Boundaries — Respect 

Lucky July 29 2014-26Weaving these four listed elements (boundaries, respect, calm expectation, and upbeat fun) together will take you a long way in the right direction. When we talk about having the knack (to pull off raising the Weimaraner), this is where it is useful. Balancing the right limitations while requiring the pup show age-appropriate respect sets the atmosphere for positive learning. The snappy-shark-biting Weimaraner puppy needs to learn bite inhibition, but it is unrealistic to expect a young pup to act adult-like. Don’t reward their bad behavior; require more compliance at each step along the juncture.

 Calm Expectation — Upbeat Fun

Getting compliance, respect, and setting the age-appropriate boundaries is vitally important. Nevertheless, unless this process is tempered with upbeat fun, and anchored with calm expectation your efforts may be foiled. The pictured pup is being rehabilitated. Not so long ago, he would not share his toys, and to reach for them would net a growl followed by a snappy-bite. At his age, this is not acceptable. Cliff began the process of rehabilitation by letting him chill. There was no real expectation; furthermore, there was no opportunity to engage anyone over a toy, food, or a bone. Training had to begin from ground up, with him realizing we don’t endorse the bad behavior. A few weeks later Cliff, and Lauren, have him playing with the toys. He is retrieving to hand. He sits inches from the toy, and waits the opportunity to have it. How grand is this?

This behavioral issue was managed with a special knack. Yes, there were limits–no growling allowed. Redirection, and upbeat fun are both very important. The  perfect underpinning is set with the right attitude. It is important to have a non-reactive, calm, and in-charge persona. This is not about (you) the handler. It is about getting results.

Prevention is Preferable to Rehabilitation

The four disciplines we mention (boundaries, respect, calm expectation, and upbeat fun) are equally important. Leaving any one of these out will not produce the desired goal. Each achievement is carefully tested, and monitored. A second-chance placement for such a Weimaraner needs to fail-safe. If you engage a trainer for your Weimaraner puppy, these elements should be identifiable, and you should see positive results. Most of the training would be teaching you have to achieve these goals with your puppy. Read more about the pup pictured in today’s blog–click here!

 

Note: This male was nearly eight months old when he was returned. He was intact. Check with anyone who deals with canine rehabilitation, and dog problems. They will all tell you getting the dog altered in a timely manner is imperative. Hormones affect behavior. Please get your pets altered in a timely manner. Thank You!

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