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Alli

Spooky Spoiled

     ~Nonetheless, Much-Loved

Scartozzi's Alli-2Thought you might enjoy to see how my girl Alli is doing! She is a love bug, but boy is she afraid of everything! As a pup I exposed her to everything and she is still afraid of every loud sound, the lawn mower, and gun shots (which we have a lot of) just to name a couple. She is terrified of getting her nails clipped even though that is also something I worked on with her as a pup. She is just a dog with her very own ways. She loves me to no end and her whole butt wages when I am near. She shares my pillow with me and we cuddle when she is scared. She loves my kids and gives them lots of kisses.
She has been a huge part of our family and I am so blessed you’ve allowed us to have this sweet girl!
~Ashley

Breeder Comment

There are many ways to end up with issues–especially loud noise sensitivity. We humans and I am not saying Ashley did or didn’t do this, tend to do the very thing that ingrains the fear rather than alleviates it. It is the most natural response in most cases. Well, nuff said. (Yes, I know it is more correctly enough said). Maybe it will be a topic of discussion one day soon. We have spoken about it before.

Thank you, Ashley, for loving this sweet girl and sharing with us.

It Begins

Kaboom!

graphics-fireworks-769931Yes, folks, we are at the juncture of the two-week nerve-racking celebration of our Independence. All too many Weimaraners shake and hide during the hoopla. Most Weim parents do the exact opposite of what will help prevent this horrid situation. It is good to keep in mind that the most natural response is typically the wrong one. Here are some suggestions for survival and if your Weimaraner is not afraid of noise–to prevent ingraining a fear of loud sounds.

Thundershirt

Rupert Requires the Thundershirt

 

Fireworks are a Thing

  • Even if you hate them, stay calm and unfazed by the fireworks. Your Weimaraner takes their cue from you, and they are a reader of their human’s deepest thoughts.
  • Work on desensitizing them to the noise. You might even try some small explosions –staged with you doing something fun. Possibly, you sit on the sofa, and you have a neighbor light off a smaller explosion. Hopefully, your Weim will not take notice. As with preparing the Weimaraner to accept gunfire, a gradual increase is the best approach.
  • If they are staying in you might consider very thunderous music and putting them in a small inner location (crated). For example, move a crate to the laundry and set up a radio that blasts music (rather than calming music consider something like Rock with ups and downs to cover the outdoor blasts.)
  • Some of you might want to plan a trip to the mountains (or the beach) away from the city.
  • Others might opt for a daycare situation that has this covered. That would not be something we would suggest unless your pet uses the daycare on a regular basis.
  • The Thundershirt, worn by Rupert (Topper X Dusty) is always a good option. Many folks, report it helps a lot. You still have time to get one shipped if you act today. Chewy is amazingly fast–click here to order one!
  • Make sure your pet’s microchip is registered with AKC Reunite. Every 4th of July Holiday, the shelters see an influx of lost pets. Should the unthinkable happen, be sure you will receive the phone call that retrieves them quickly back to you.
  • Finally, you may want to consider anti-anxiety medication for this particular situation. Discuss this with your Veterinarian.

There are countless posts that address helping your pet cope with this holiday–for a good reason. It is a tough one. Even some gundogs do not like the fireworks, while they are unfazed by working in the field. No matter how you feel about any of this, one thing you can do is to remain calm. You may want to escape with your pet or pets. Try to find a place that fireworks are not allowed. Be safe and enjoy the festivities. Thank you, for thinking of your Weimaraner’s best interest.

This Week’s OwyheeStar News

Hello from far Eastern Oregon

A OwyheeStar Sign with Yuccas_1238The Heat, Holiday, and Helpers

We had record-setting temperatures in the Treasure Valley. It is not uncommon to see triple digit temperatures in August, and even in July. However, to see them happening at the end of June is unbelievable.

OwyheeStar has had a busy week trying to keep everyone safe, cool, and well-hydrated. Cliff had to install an air conditioner in the shop. Until this week, it was cool enough using a fan. Of course, we celebrated Independence Day. The fireworks were great.

Here are the links for this week’s posts….

How Did Your Weim Cope?

fireworks-01-juneWe had varied reports. Goose was unfazed by the fireworks. Others were scrambling to accommodate their Weim, and used Thunder Shirts to try to avoid stress. Once your Weim has developed a fear of loud sounds, it is hard to turn back the clock. Owners often (unknowing)ingrain the fear of loud sounds. There are development cycles within a dog’s life actually called fear-periods. During these times, a dog will suddenly become afraid of something. The normal response is to baby them and tell them it is alright. Nothing could be worse for the Weimaraner. By consoling them, you ingrain the fear, and tell them their fearful behavior is justified (and normal). If you are upset, or unnerved too, this adds to the depth of ingraining. Turning around this type of thing takes time, patience, and a knack. There is a company that makes a DVD you play that is classical music. The background had either gun fire, or fireworks. The volume of the loud noise increases over times. This can help desensitize them.

4july001If you are raising a puppy, the best approach is to desensitize them, and keep them that way. Yes, you can buy the DVD and use it. You can also ding a pan very lightly and give a snack. Even better enlist a helper to do that. Using this method you introduce sound gradually, much like you would introduce a Weim to gun fire. The proper method is important. Initially, the sound should be in the background, and some distance away. The Weim should be doing something very fun (retrieving, getting a snack, or running around the yard with you). The noise should not distract them. Have your assistant move closer, and over a period of days (or weeks) repeat the exercise. Don’t force the issue. You, the handler, should ignore your assistant.

fireworks-02-juneVacuuming at the Weim is sure to cause issue. Put them in their safe place (a crate), and vacuum. Chasing most dogs will create a problem with the vacuum cleaner, and associate noise with a fear of vacuums. Some people will move a crate near the washer and dryer, and put them in that area when they are gone. These appliances emit varied sound, and it can become soothing–especially the dryer. Leave the television or music going. Random noise can help them learn to deal with the unexpected sounds they will have in life. No time is worse than the 4th of July, but try not to be uptight. Yes, it can get tiresome listening to the illegal fireworks going off all week, and seeing it upset your Weimaraner. However, your frustration doesn’t help the Weimaraner cope.

Looking AheadNick with a puppy

We are lining up the ducks. The next two-three weeks will take us through another round of puppy exits. Our clients are well aware of all that entails. I have been working on blog-drafts, so I can be sure each day has one ready to go. We have several updates to share, and we will see how it comes together. Right now, I have two posts in a publish-ready format. I hope I can get more done today, but we are off to take some cute puppy photos. Many of you saw the random photos we took of Brad and Nick with the pups this week. I posted the most popular one here.

Thank you again for liking OwyheeStar, and for keeping us updated. We have a couple of exciting updates to share for the coming week.

Many blessings and warm wishes from Shela and Cliff–

(and the OwyheeStar Weimaraners too!)

~Thank you for being a part of our lives!