Buzzwords Aside

Holistic

     ~Veterinary Care

Dusty-4342-2 2Cliff and I proponents of a more Holistic approach to caring for the beloved Weimaraner. Limitations may exist–possibly a budget issue. Nonetheless, we always recommend you feed a quality grain-free appropriate food. Some folks have gone so far as to opt for a cooked diet or the raw diet. These are very personal choices, and if you choose them rather than the typical kibble menu, you need to do your research.

What does the Holistic approach entail? Most assuredly it begins with the diet. Many ailments and health issues can be avoided with a proper diet. In truth, one type doesn’t fit all. Some Weims like certain humans are allergic to various things–grains, specific proteins, and particular grasses. Removing these from their environment is the right decision. Ultimately, the choices you and your Veterinarian make should be Holistic in their approach–building their immune system and improving the Weimaraner’s health.

Beyond the diet, there are other considerations such as the vaccine protocol and medications. We won’t go into detail here. Nonetheless, we have shared on several occasions about some medications that are best avoided. The vaccine protocol is something we discuss with every puppy client. Immunization is essential, but you need to know and understand the Weimaraner vaccine recommendations. There is a reason that the Weimaraner Club of America makes such recommendations.

Click here to read what Dr. Jeff Feinman has to say, here is an excerpt from one of his articles:

In a Holistic practice we see our patient’s current health status as part of a continuum which begins before birth and ends in death, with each step along the way influencing what happens subsequently. Thus, rather than selectively suppressing or palliating a symptom, the aim is to elevate the health status so that not only are today’s symptoms addressed curatively, but we leave our patient healthier and more resilient for the days to come. If maladies are truly cured early in life, the patient will grow old gracefully and without the common degenerations we have come to call “normal” aging processes. (There is a great difference between “common” and “normal”.)

What About

Worms

      ~and Other Parasites

3-Juniper X Boone 2018 Wk3-17This topic (of worms) is not one we like to discuss unless we are talking about putting the fishing worm on the hook–even then, to many it is a nauseating thought. Nonetheless, worms and parasites are opportunistic. They find ways to survive inside your pet as well as in extreme environmental conditions. Dog’s Naturally has posted some natural solutions that you might find helpful. Here is their article —click here to find out more.

Signs of Worms

Some worms cause more obvious symptoms than others. I’ve provided more specific symptom information below along with information about the different types of worms (See Types of Worms below) … but here are a few clues your dog may give you that could mean he has worms:

  • Intermittent or frequent diarrhea or vomiting can be signs your dog has worms.
  • Your dog may have a fever.
  • He may scoot and lick his rear (though scooting can mean other things too).
  • Your dog may be off his food or be a little lethargic; his coat may look dull.
  • You might see stools that are coated in mucus (but otherwise look normal).
  • Or you might see squiggly worms or “rice bodies” in his stool.

But some worms can’t be seen with the naked eye, so if your dog’s showing some of these signs, you might want to get a fecal sample analyzed by your vet.

Cliff and I suggest you keep your eye on the pooh–I know it doesn’t sound lovely, but getting a fecal check can help you avoid some of the more unpleasant scenarios. A loose stool doesn’t always mean there is something amiss, but when something like that happens, you want to keep watch. Of course, we love adding the pumpkin (or even banana squash). We are planting Banana Squash in our garden. Right now I only have two hills ready to plant. I would like more, but we have to see if we can make more room. Last year, I baked the banana squash and frozen it in chunks for easy serving. The Weims love it!

A Note

From Jacie

Fairchild 4082ABB5-B839-485D-8240-18AF313FF5F5

Hello Ms. Shela and Mr. Cliff,

Fairchild E3A2274C-89F1-4DD0-8F1B-34FADA1F91EFI was able to get mom to send you a note on my behalf.  I’m still not able to figure out this typing thing 😉.  All is well here in Georgia.  Mom and Dad are still spoiling me rotten.  I have a new sister (as you can see in the background).  I wasn’t thrilled at first but I guess she can stay.  Lol.  I will get mom to make more pics as I think the camera likes me or maybe I like the camera.  Lol.  Signing off for now.  #sendingWeimkisses 🐶🐶🐶😘😘Fairchild FF2B7FA4-4C5C-437E-B2A9-982A7FC3BDA3
Shela and Cliff, thanks again for breeding such a wonderful Weim!  She has brought so much joy to our home. Jacie is doing well.
Kisha – Atlanta
Breeder Comment
We do so appreciate hearing from you. It is fantastic news that Jacie is thriving. Give her a hug from us.

Tucked In

Weimar

     ~Goldee Style

31960692_10100424158255768_3182296936401076224_oGoldee has been news-worthy over the last few years. She made her modeling debut. She tried to teach her little brother (Maverick AKA Meatball) how to win friends and influence Grandma. There is the pool time, the garden time, and just hanging around the house time–sometimes this involves the hair styling. More often than not though, Goldee is tucked into bed.

She seems to love to be wrapped in the luxury of the blankets, sheets, or whatever. This bedtime we find her head buried beneath her pillow. It is as if she hiding from the disturbance to her beauty rest. OMG–we all need our rest and recuperation, right? Please come to bed Mama and quit talking.

Availability

What Is the Most Frequent Inquiry?

Bernie X Boone Babies Wk 4-7

You know the answer to that question. It is about the current availability for our puppies. I pasted in the information I shared not that long ago about how things work. It is not as people imagine. Regardless, I wanted to drop a universal message that we have a couple of males that are not yet promised.

I am not frantic–this type of thing always shakes out as it is meant to be and I have not said much for several reasons. One—we have been insanely busy with the pups, the garden, the farm, and life in general. You understand I am confident your life is similar. Secondly, we only want the right type of inquiry. On the car lot, you have tire kickers–those who spend a lot of time but never are going to buy a car from you. Here, we have puppy-crazed folks who are either looking for the perfect pup and maybe their ideas are off the chart or those who are in love with the idea but they know they are not getting a pup. They can fill out the application and write me somewhere between 50-100 times. They are not willing to invest a small amount to get on our Wait List–that is a clue.

We have a Wait List that leans toward the female. That will color the future availability. Of course, as you read on you will discover we don’t have a clue how things will shake out. What if we get an entire litter of females? It has happened. Then too, what if we get mostly males–we won’t have a pup for these folks. We do have quite a few families who might favor the female, but they are willing to accept a male if that is what they can get. That kind of situations is more natural (and tends to work best of all) because we have so little control over the situation.

Please skip to the bottom to read about our Spring 2018 Status if you read this explanation before. If not, please consider investing the time to understand our situation. Thank you!

Inexplicable Craziness

The inexplicable craziness associated with raising the Weimaraner cannot be precisely defined. Nonetheless, we would like to shed some light on things from our side of the fence. We understand that many folks who come to us in search of the Weimaraner have waited until the eleventh hour and now they are in the hope of finding a pup sooner rather than later. On a rare occasion, we might see ourselves with an available pup upon your inquiry. This scenario could happen if the folks on the wait list are not ready (have a different timeline). There are the other factors too–the sex, the coat color, and the coat length to mention the three biggies. Also, for example, some folks want to hunt upland game, truffles, or sheds. We are looking for the Weims with the most hunt-potential for those engaged in hunting. During our Discovery and Placement Test process, we ascertain whether the pup is more inclined towards scent, and other cues. That doesn’t mean the less hunt-potential pup could not be a suitable hunting companion; however, we hope to place those pups with the Companion Weim folks. Other than the Weim-seeker’s preferences, availability and litters are affected by factors we often have little to no control over.

Heat Cycles

The female’s heat cycle might not be entirely consistent. Certain age-appropriate females will come into season every six months–others not so much. We figure on average any female might cycle about every seven months; however, there are times when our best guess is off. Last winter, for example, all the girls came into heat way behind schedule despite the chagrin of many. The lateness caused the arrival we got to be later and for some people, this time change was not going to work.

Mating Complexities

The complexity of mating cannot be understated. There is a reason we have more than one sire–we don’t keep breeding back to the same lineage. The right sire choice is essential. In some situations, we have had the luxury to use multiple sires; however, many times we have but one option. Or, where we have mixed in the Longhairs, we might have one option if we don’t want any Longhair pups in a litter. For example, Boone doesn’t carry the Longhair DNA marker–whereas, Stackhouse is a Longhair. Any female that carries the Longhair marker and is mated to Stackhouse would produce some Longhair pups. All this planning doesn’t always end up producing a litter.

When You Get Nothing

There are times when a mating happens, and it doesn’t produce pups. We suspect this happens a lot more than anyone talks about because we get inquiries from folks who have waited elsewhere and after two matings they never got a puppy. We also know, as we talked about with the four (from the Callie X Zee litter), not every female is a good producer. Vidalia never produced a single pup despite many efforts. Ginger and Cindee inconsistently produced small litters. Only Mousse produced the average-sized litter consistently. Who would have guessed? The lack of litters from a mating thing is not the end of the challenges.

To list a few other things–some females do not carry the litter to term. You watch their tummy grow, and they miscarry. Yes, it happens to the Weimaraner just as it does to some women. Or the litter might only produce one or two pups. All that time spent hoping, and you have not much to show for it. Those folks waiting for a puppy can become disillusioned. We can experience these feelings too! We have to shake off anything negative quickly. After waiting, and the pups arrive new information is available. Sometimes it is not as we hoped.

Spring 2018

7-Bernie X Boone 2018 Wk4We have the pups–but possibly not what some wanted. You know, the silver-gray female is the most popular choice at this point in time. Many times in the past, we have had a lot of silver-gray females born and everyone seemed to want a blue or a male. We cannot just mate endlessly. We have to have homes for pups–so there is a limit to what we can do. This applies to the workload as well as the placement process. We (Cliff and I) wanted to make you aware that if you are thinking of getting a male, we might have one available very shortly. If you are serious, we would love to hear from you.

Celebrating

Boone

    ~The Birthday Boy

We had planned to try to do a Blog Featuring Boone this week. He celebrated a milestone–his second birthday. He was born May 1, 2016. Can we just say we could not be happier with him? His temperament, health, and overall all performance is everything for which we hoped.

 

Here are a few of the photos we took a few weeks back. You might remember Boone appearing on the Blog (March 14th), then. If not, or you wish to review that information — click here!

2018 Weekly Synopsis

Greetings From Far Eastern Oregon

At OwyheeStar

IMG_0853The crops are growing as you can see here our wheat is doing well. Cliff has been clearing out debris at the sanctuary in the hope of getting some grass coming.

IMG_0839We will be making use of this magical place for the pups very shortly. More than anything it is vital to get rid of the cheatgrass. Puppies and the girls are best of friends. They are never happier when the pups are friendly–not puppy biting or scratching. Of course, the sad fact they cannot understand is when we have no puppies. Where did they go? Why did they leave? There are so many questions, and our answers are inadequate–we don’t know what to say.

This Week on the Blog

20180501_072751We hope you enjoyed this week’s posts. You might have noticed the theme–Swimming Weimaraners. The comments were busy. Those who have had no luck getting the Weim to swim seemed to make the most comments. Nonetheless, we hope something here will inspire you. We closed on Friday with news of Pushkin and Marie having made it to Mesa, Arizona. The photo was lovely, don’t you agree?

Sunday—April 29 — Hikers (Finding Antler Sheds)

Monday — April 30 — Looking Ahead (puppy swim)

Tuesday — May 1 — This Can Happen

Wednesday — May 2 — Extraordinary

Thursday – May 3 — Water Weims

Friday — May 4 — Pushkin & Marie

On a very personal note

Puskin & Marie

In Mesa, Arizona

20180429_081112The travels with Pushkin are going well. We arrived in Mesa yesterday morning. The photo is of a sunrise somewhere in Nevada. I am not sure where we were when I took it as we were driving from Susanville to Las Vegas. I do know that we had crossed the state line into Nevada.
20180501_072751I had to stop a little more often than I normally would to let Push exercise a bit but really no complaining on his part about the long ride. The picture of Pushkin was taken in my mother’s backyard in Mesa.
I know that I have said this multiple times, but thanks for the wonderful companion
Marie

Breeder’s Comment

We are so very glad to hear that you and Pushkin made a safe journey to Mesa, AZ. Thank you, for remembering us!

Water Weims

Webbed Toes

     ~Propel them through the Water

cranes-lucy9111

The Weimaraner is a powerful swimmer once they get going. The trick is getting to take the first step. Their toes are webbed making them better equipped to paddle.

There is no one way to get them to swim; however, we find having a love of the retrieve ingrained goes a long way towards accomplishing this discipline. (Sorry to some of you!) For the non-hunter, many times the retrieve is not viewed as essential. All too many of you allow the Weimaraner to abscond and run around the yard with the toy or the bumper–instead of bringing back to hand. Yes, this is a hoot–although it is just one more Weim antic, this is one we suggest you not allow to take root. The idea of achieving the swim is only one reason in a myriad of why you need to get the rock-solid retrieve. We won’t list those as we are speaking about achieving the Water Retrieve.

The Recall

You want the Weimaraner coming when called. The Recall is a safety issue and the underpinning of compliance. Two areas where compromise cannot be allowed (in our opinion). Depending on your approach to training there are various ways to get this done–we will forgo the discussion on methodology. Let’s just say get this done! It is going to help you with achieving more than a Water Retrieve.

Early On

Cliff suggests you find a place to do this exercise. One location that works well is a hallway. Close all the adjoining doors (so they cannot take off with the bumper of the toy). Make this a special event and stop before they tire–while they are still begging for more. He also suggests you use a dedicated toy or bumper you save for this activity only. Depending on your pup’s attention and skill level keep the number of reps down–at first maybe as few as three. Bear in mind; the idea is to make this celebratory and fun. You want them having the desire. This activity will serve you well on so many levels and enhance your training outcome positively.

Water Exposure

Weather Permitting the OwyheeStar puppy will see the water before they depart. You saw the video we shared, if not we included it here. Nevertheless, this is not going to ensure that your pup will swim. It will still require time, effort, and patience to get your Weimaraner to swim–plus a bit of knack. A few suddenly jump in but don’t wait for that to happen. Oh–and if you doubt, the Weimaraner is more than likely going to read your thoughts and agree with you.

You might wonder how to begin. Cliff does it this way–your situation may require you to adapt. Using the reliable retrieve, you work along the edges of a pond. Just play in the water’s edge–a tiny bit on their feet initially. Slowly ease them into the water beyond their comfort zone. It might take a few tries, a few days, or a few weeks. It takes as long as it takes, but if you follow this protocol, you will achieve the goal. Like anything with the concrete thinking Weimaraner, you want to make this part of the early life training. Then it becomes the norm. Oh, and you notice he mentions using the pond. Waves could spook them. You want to avoid that scenario.

Imagine the possibilities!

Crane's Lucy 957

A Few Final Thoughts

  1. Weims who balk at the sight of rain or a sprinkler often achieve the swim.
  2. Don’t go in with the *pre-conceived idea that it cannot be achieved.
  3. Select the venue to work on this carefully.
  4. Go in with the idea it takes as long as it takes.
  5. Make this part of your young pup’s agenda.
  6. If you *failed to achieve the swim early on, don’t believe it is impossible.
  7. Some people use a life vest**. The vests are not necessary.
  8. Often Cliff is teaching a Weimaraner who has not swum since they were a puppy. They might be 2 years old or older. They always learn. Cliff knows it can be achieved. Sometimes it is challenging but, with patience, it always happens.
  9. Deem this as invaluable to your process. It is a healthy activity that can burn off the excess energy and not take such a toll on the hips and joints. It is good for their cardiovascular as well.

~ We hope this helps someone achieve the swim! ~ Cliff and Shela

 

*You would be shocked to learn how many folks achieved the swim after they told us it was impossible.

**Life Vests–just a note here that Cliff never uses one. The only vest he might use is a Neoprene one if he were to swim them in inclement weather–like for Duck Hunting. Some of you need this for peace of mind. It might help the Weimaraner take their first few steps, but again–it is not necessary. A lot of clients who live in cold water regions cannot keep their Weims out of the water. This scenario is true even in the winter.

 

 

 

Extraordinary

Weim Families

     ~ Like Virginia

dog-pond

Here is a picture of the pond I had built for my babies Dusty and Stormy (Weims).

Mom I don't look like a Blue, ....I am a Blue Weimaraner. I love this pond you built Mom...

Breeder’s Comment

Maybe you follow OwyheeStar Weimaraners both here and on Facebook. If so, you know about the late Stormy and our aging Dusty.

Seriously I thought I was the go-to person

 

These are not the same Weims–they are Virginia’s Stormy and Dusty. Ours and Virginia’s Weims are all the Blue Weimaraner. Virginia’s Stormy is a Blue Longhair Weimaraner.

OwyheeStar’s Dusty is the father of both of Virginia’s pups. He is a smooth-coated Weimaraner (pictured to the left), but he carries the DNA marker for the Longhair. This Story originally ran some time ago.–click here to read the full story.