Thanksgiving 2016

Celebrate

       ~ Please Keep In Mind

10703995_10203865392493285_2238146014813983610_n (1)We send you the warmest of greetings. Thank you for your faithful friendship. We value our relationship. It is the season to give thanks and to remember all we have to celebrate.

  1. We are thankful for our family.
  2. We are thankful for the life we can lead–thank you to those who made this possible. (veterans, and those who paid the ultimate sacrifice–including their families).
  3. We are thankful to our God for his provision
  4. We are thankful for our friends, and clients–many times they are one in the same.

Today–it will find many of you traveling, or scurrying to make-ready. We, likewise, have things associated with the Thanksgiving holiday to prepare for as well as our usual daily hoopla. We cannot omit the fact that we are thankful for the Weimaraner. This fact goes without saying. It speaks to the heart of our life; these wonderful fur family members are those who bring a smile to so many people every day.

 Preventing the Unthinkable

The last thing any of us want is a trip to the emergency room (albeit for a human, or the Weimaraner). This scenario is never truer than in the midst of a holiday. Unfortunately, this is a time when we can become distracted for a moment, or miss what is happening. It is hard to keep an eye on all the well-meaning guests who want to sneak a tidbit to the Weim, or the plates left unattended. Here are some things to keep forefront in your mind during our celebration.

  1. Counter-surfing — it takes a moment, and they have snatched it.
  2. Trash-raiding — make sure it is Weimaraner safe. Ingested cooked turkey bones, foil, string, and a myriad of other items can lead to emergency surgery.
  3. Skip the bones entirely — you might want to treat them, but things can go awry.
  4. Table scraps need to be carefully monitored. With guests sneaking them a bit here and there, it can easily get out of control. These rich additions can upset their tummy, or trigger a more severe condition. For example, the turkey skin might seem harmless, but the fatty morsel (or too much human food in general) could trigger a pancreatic attack. Weims tend to have a sensitive tummy; however, the important thing is to remember a dog cannot handle all this fatty and calorie-laden holiday food (or the trimmings). The best approach would be to set a dish of allowed scraps and tell people they must not have any more than what is on the plate. This strategy may not prevent the well-meaning guest from giving them the forbidden.
  5. Ingested rising bread or roll dough stories abound on the Internet. Yes, it does pose a danger. Cake, and yeasty bread batter when ingested, expands rapidly in the dog’s gut.
  6. The dangers are not limited to what we plan to eat. Remember the risk includes candles, cut flowers, alcohol, potpourri, etc.
  7. Finally, do not forget about things like sugarless gum, candy, etc. The Weimaraner is opportunistic, and they can find a jelly bean at the bottom of someone’s handbag.

Manners and Your Guests

Respect is a two-way street. Some Weimaraners will jump up, and they do it playfully. They may like to nibble or corn-bite as some call it, or even nip when they get excited. Their toenails could catch grandma’s skin, and cause an unintentional dangerous scratch–looking like an encounter with a knife. They could knock a child or unstable person to the ground. Even the well-mannered dog could be playing, and someone could catch a tooth. Unfortunately, this can lead to serious problems–a trip to the emergency room, reports filed, and people making accusations about your Weimaraner. Another side of the issue is you don’t know what someone is doing to the Weimaraner when you are not looking. Things can go awry in fast order if the family pet becomes challenged, afraid, or territorial. Make every effort to avoid these situations. It is not unthinkable to use a crate–when you cannot be in control of the situation. The saying– it is better safe than sorry is true.

We cannot say what is the best situation for you, and your gathering. We suggest you proceed with caution. The crate-trained Weimaraner might be safer in their den. Putting them out in the yard, while everyone is inside can also cause issues. The Weimaraner is like a child who never grows up. The high energy filled Weimaraner doesn’t stand down. The aroma stimulates and fuels their excitement. Ultimately, we all want them to be a huge part of everything we do. They require supervision. 

The Weimaraner is part of your family. You must plan for them like everyone else. Thank you for remembering that during this holiday season.

 

About OwyheeStar

We are Professional Weimaraner breeders--with forty years experience at raising puppies. For many years, we have focused exclusively on the Weimaraner! If you are considering the Weimaraner, or live with one, we welcome you to sign up to our blog. We sincerely hope you will find the information, the stories, and varied posts insightful (as well as entertaining). To those who live with an OwyheeStar Weimaraner, we send special thanks. We appreciate the photos, the news, and your friendship. Thank you for being a part of the extended OwyheeStar family.

Posted on November 24, 2016, in Companion Weimaraner, Dangers, Feeding the Weimaraner, Food, General Health, Health and Wellness, Hot Topics, Information and Education, Ingested items, OwyheeStar, Quirks and Quandaries, The Weimaraner, Veterinary Topics and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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