Why oh Why?

Quirks and Quandaries

Many years of working with the Weimaraner and people associated with the breed have taught us a few things. One to keep in mind is that even though you have had the breed before it doesn’t ensure smooth sailing. The twists and turns of getting them raised can take a sudden spin and normally this in direct response to human error. Very often, this associated issue develops when it appears you are doing everything right. It has always worked before; however, those with multiple children will tell you that even with the same parents (and DNA pool) no two are identical. Each must be considered for the person they are and what works for them. A stressor for one is of no concern to another. With that in mind, we saw this comment from an OwyheeStar Client. Here is their response to a blog posted last week.

Hi we received a puppy from you, Bella from the litter on May 5, 2015. We are experiencing something I’m not sure how to deal with. When Jon and I go to work or at night when we are asleep, she is chewing holes in our drywall. She is exercised two a day off leash. She has plenty of toys and chew things. We know it is separation anxiety (except that we are home at night). We’re not sure how to address this. We’ve never had a dog do this before and we previously owned two Weimies.

 

Jardine's Trigger_n

Trigger

A few of Bella’s Littermates

Please note this is not the Bella featured in Sunday’s Blog. Nevertheless, this Bella is a littermate to two recently featured Weims–Bentley and Molly. Trigger is also a littermate.  You may well remember Trigger because he was lost and found and his story of recovery was featured on this blog too!

Sheetrock Chewing

This hole-in-the-wall-chewing is not an uncommon occurrence with this breed. Nevertheless, we have written about this on several occasions, and it is a behavior best avoided akin to digging, incessant barking, and chewing on the house siding. These behaviors can begin during a stressful situation or a transition period–some call them ‘fear periods’ during the developmental first three years. Yes, I said three years. The Weimaraner can demonstrate a teenage-type of flakiness that rivals the human counterpart.

The only response we know is to reel in the Weimaraner and to rely on the crate. Freedom must be earned. Continued freedom and allowance of this or any unwanted activity will ingrain it, and it can become nearly impossible to break the cycle. With the smallest stress, they may sneak around and find a place to chew for comfort or to let off the stress. No doubt the incurring response creates further anxiety and fuels the issue in many cases.

Unwanted Behaviors Thwarted

This (and other) undesirable behaviors can be overcome; however, the key is finding an approach that works. Being calm and proactive will serve you well. We recommend using the crate and supervising all activities until the behavior no longer becomes an issue. Positive reinforcement and getting them to realize you do not want this behavior is a plus. Stay calm and this means inside. If you are upset by the hole in the drywall (and who wouldn’t be?) then, this can add to the problem. Maybe some of you readers can speak to this situation. Please feel free to share your experience if you have overcome a quirky behavior situation. We appreciate your positive and appropriate suggestions. Cliff and I thank you in advance.

Please Note: A rehomed Weimaraner would also experience this type of stressor and can quickly become unmanageable. Change in a schedule, location, your attention, etc. are all potential catalysts.

About OwyheeStar

We are Professional Weimaraner breeders--with forty years experience at raising puppies. For many years, we have focused exclusively on the Weimaraner! If you are considering the Weimaraner, or live with one, we welcome you to sign up to our blog. We sincerely hope you will find the information, the stories, and varied posts insightful (as well as entertaining). To those who live with an OwyheeStar Weimaraner, we send special thanks. We appreciate the photos, the news, and your friendship. Thank you for being a part of the extended OwyheeStar family.

Posted on May 23, 2016, in AKC, Behavior & Training, Companion Weimaraner, Crate Training, Information and Education, Ingested items, Mailbox Topics, OwyheeStar, Puppy Development, Puppy Tips & Info, Quirks and Quandaries, Re-homed Weimaraner, Separation Anxiety, The Weimaraner, Training and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. even when a lot of peeps feel uncomfy to use a crate, you are right: freedom must be earned. too much freedom leads to shoe-confetti :o(

  2. Maizie is our first crate-trained dog. Can’t say enough good about the results! And, she loves her crate–her own personal space!

    • I believe that embracing the crate can save the Weim’s life as well as prevent a lot of bad things from happening. Then it is always an option when you need it –for travel or behavior issues. Thank you for being so great with Maizie.

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