Dodging a Potential Issue

Lisa and Sadie

 

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“What Do You Mean We Have To Move?”

Hello, my name is Lisa, and our weim is Sadie.  She just had her 7th birthday on 4/29.  We are going to relocate from our house to an apartment.

Sadie does have a lot of separation anxiety when she’s left home alone.  She is mostly never home alone for longer than an hour.  We take her with us in the car when it is possible. Sadie barks the full time she is left alone in the car. She sometimes quiets if she sees us go into the store. Anyhow, she doesn’t like to be away from us.
The weather is warming up here in Vancouver, WA. I cannot be taking her along and leaving her in the car. The warmer weather means that she must be left alone at home rather than taking her along. Now that we are moving it concerns me–I mean the heat means we need to leave her behind. I’m also concerned she will have a difficult time adjusting to her new surroundings or will she?
Can you tell me how to help Sadie become accustomed to the new apartment?

Thoughts from Cliff and Shela

Separation anxiety is something the Weimaraner is prone to develop. The best approach is preventative; however, even once your Weim has a healthy dose all is not lost. Here are a few thoughts that may help Sadie deal with or adjust to the changes.
1. First, don’t make a big deal out of the move yourself. Your frustration, anxiety, and concern will be internalized and externalized by Sadie. The Weimaraner tends to pick up on our cues.
2. Rely on the crate and go back to the basics. Freedom is earned until the adjustment is made. Safety first and apartment living also means closer neighbors.
3. Depending upon Sadies quirks, it might be a good idea to sleep on a pillowcase and then use it for a bedding cover in the crate. Don’t wash it–get your scent on it and then just use it. Your scent is a powerful thing to her–a comfort. Nevertheless, if she chews up her bedding and ingests it that can create a different kind of havoc.
4. If Sadie’s anxiety is severe, you might consider using Prozac. Medication can be a short-term solution to help her bridge the change. We like to avoid this situation; however, it is a judgment call as to whether this is something you need. If you are concerned, consider asking your Veterinary if this would be an option.
5. Old dogs can learn new tricks and one way you can help Sadie a lot is to help her learn to be more adaptable. That means mixing up her schedule and introducing new things. Don’t make a big deal out of this but even before you move, try relocating her crate and using it more. Do things in a different way instead of keeping things even keel.
6. Try to make a new Vancouver doggie friend and schedule a play date. Maybe you can work out a situation where you help someone else by taking the kids for an adventure and Sadie can learn to go with them. A home-away-from-home situation is always a welcome alternative.
7. Remain calm and believe in your heart everything is going to work out. Positive and upbeat thoughts will help you succeed.

Tell Us What Worked For You

We welcome ideas from our OwyheeStar clients. Can you help Sadie with this adjustment process? Please drop a comment here for Sadie and her mother. They live in the Vancouver, WA area if that helps anyone with a suggestion.

About OwyheeStar

We are Professional Weimaraner breeders--with forty years experience at raising puppies. For many years, we have focused exclusively on the Weimaraner! If you are considering the Weimaraner, or live with one, we welcome you to sign up to our blog. We sincerely hope you will find the information, the stories, and varied posts insightful (as well as entertaining). To those who live with an OwyheeStar Weimaraner, we send special thanks. We appreciate the photos, the news, and your friendship. Thank you for being a part of the extended OwyheeStar family.

Posted on May 18, 2016, in Behavior & Training, Health and Wellness, Hot Topics, Information and Education, Playdate, Quirks and Quandaries, Separation Anxiety, Socialization, Veterinary Topics, Weimaraner Playdate and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. Easy is a velcro-dog too… but he fortunately makes other places like hotels or houses of relatives to “his home” very quickly… my aunt was surprised to find him in her bed, but she has a sense for humor :o)

  2. Ron Weatherman

    Hi, this is Ron Weatherman to tell you about OUR Sadie and her recent move. We sold our winter home in Mesquite, Nv. to return to our main home in Chewelah Wa. Sadie, who had a bed in most every room loves to travel and has gotten much better about being left for short periods of time. I have used a bark collar on occasion with great success. Returning to Washington was made more easy for her as she has many great memories here but her special toys, chew rags, bedding as well as sleeping on our bed for a few days made the transition more easy for her. She is very clingy with me and must be with me or under foot all the time. She has now returned to her nighttime bed and is doing fine. She is also 7 years old in one more month. Sadie is a big girl, now at 95 pounds of solid muscle. She gets a couple of miles walking every morning and play time in the afternoon. Instead of her life revolving around us, our lives revolve around her and all her needs. Worse or better than having children. Things we dislike the most are the facts that she is a Democrat or must be. She gets everything done for her and provided for her. Try as we do to convert her to being more conservative, she demands on being depended on us for everything and contributes nothing. Is that not a Democrat?

    ________________________________

  3. All good suggestions! I also make a point from the start (when I get a new puppy or dog) to leave them safe places for short time periods, so they get used to being left and know they don’t need to be upset. I leave my puppy/dog with a trusted friend, family, at the vet, boarding kennel, anywhere else you can think of that is safe. I try to do this after they have exercised and are tired out, so they are calmer. This can also be started anytime, I would suggest it for Sadie. It is important to always NOT make a big deal out of coming and going- our Weimars tend to be overly-dramatic sometimes, and when we feed into that or act dramatic ourselves, it makes things worse. Just be calm and non-chalant and know they are fine! Jan

    • I like how you explained this–I call it a home-away-from-home and just teaching them to be more adaptable. These things are so important early on we cannot emphasize this too much. Thank you Jan!

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