OwyheeStar’s Succeeding with the Weimaraner.11

Is The Weimaraner Right for You?

~ Part Three

 Lawrence's Addy-10
The American Kennel Club (AKC) is the oldest and most respected kennel club in America. The United Kennel Club (UKC) is another choice, but for most Weimaraner breeders they must get the AKC papers even if they are associated with the UKC. We mention this only to set the stage for our third segment discussing the Weimaraner as a choice. Many folks go straight to the AKC to discover which breed is right for them. Here is what they will find listed as the AKC on the Weimaraner’s temperament.
Lauded for his ability to work with great speed, fearlessness and endurance when on the hunt, the Weimaraner is also known for being an easily trainable, friendly and obedient member of the family. This is a breed that loves children and enjoys being part of his family’s “pack.ʺ A well-trained Weimaraner is a delight to live with, but an untrained one is akin to a canine demolition derby. Puppies should be started in classes at an early age.

Accurate–however, a bit Misleading

We can agree on one thing–the Weimaraner is hard to define on paper. People write they did their research and discovered the Weimaraner is a match. On paper or via a quiz that asks a few questions this might be true. Nevertheless, these bits of information can lead you to a decision that is either heartwarming or something shocking–it doesn’t work out for you. The latter means you probably find yourself embroiled in the soul-searching battle to get the Weimaraner to become what you expected. This concerted effort to get the Weim to become what you believe they should be is all too often followed by a drop at the rescue. Sometimes these fur-kids appear on Craig’s List (God forbid). Desperate people paint a lovely picture to look for unsuspecting people to take the Weim off their hands. Typically this is preceded by a small fortune spent on various trainers and equipment but in defeat, the desperation to get them out of the household can lead good people to do the unthinkable.
No one goes into this process thinking it will be easy. Almost everyone asks their self if they are crazy–even when this is a second time around Weim. This magnificent creature can throw you a curve ball of the best or worst kind. Depending on whether you get the save or not. With that being said, let’s look at these touted characteristics one at a time.
  • Easily trainable

Depending upon breeding and early breeder socialization the puppy you receive should be ready to learn the basics. For those who understand the commitment and follow through faithfully with the basics (house breaking, crate training, the recall as well as the loose-leash heel) things go well. All of this and more is achievable. The ease of doing so will depend on your understanding of the breed, how you follow through and is contingent on you making the right choices.

Freedom is Earned!

OwyheeStar admonishes their clients to remember that freedom is earned. Too much freedom (and who doesn’t want the puppy running around) will lead to accidents as well as the idea they are free to do as they please. This situation will affect the housebreaking or all of the basics as mentioned earlier. Even more disconcerting is the fact failure to achieve these areas of discipline may also set your pup up to develop bad habits. These behavioral issues will lead to non-compliance and in turn, create other scenarios such as making them less than welcome to others.

The Human Factor

The vast majority of the OwyheeStar puppy clients achieve success with ease; however, even some of those fall on hard times. The Weimaraner is not a dog you train and move on–they require a strong leader and insistence that they meet the standards you have set. We don’t know anyone who would claim this is an easy breed to train. Nonetheless, if you get it right, they can become a joy. To enjoy living with them requires a sense of humor as well as the ability to deal with their quirks and the quandaries to which they gravitate.

Described As

  • Friendly
  • Obedient
  • Loves children
  • Pack-loving
  • Delight to live with
Friendly— Most Weims are friendly to some degree. Socialization is important once you bring home your puppy. They can gravitate toward only caring about their family. They can become aloof and standoffish with strangers. Some are more prone to this behavior than others.
Obedient — Many people fail to master compliance on the leash. They resort to head halters or front hooking leashes to manage the situation, but that is not compliance. Others are unable to get the recall–the Weim coming when called part down. We need to remember that the Weimaraner can spend lots of time manipulating their humans. Is that the description of obedient compliance?
Miles kissingLoves Children — Raising the Weimaraner with children usually makes a big difference. There have been cases when the Weimaraner doesn’t tolerate a child. We believe this to be rare–it does happen. Conditioning the young Weimaraner to children and situations is important. They need to learn to tolerate children if nothing else. Some Weims just love the baby of the family and will lay with them for hours.
Pack-loving — The family is their pack. They are never happier than when they are leaning against, sitting on, or close to their beloved family members. This leads to a propensity towards severe separation anxiety. They really don’t like being left behind.
Delight to live with — This is probably the one item on the list we think is very misleading. 11891270_10207599167758656_1427309952331633864_nWhether they are delightful or not is going to depend on your expectations. If you are a neat freak and come home to the toilet paper shredded, the trash was strewn, and a vomiting pooch will this be upsetting? How will you approach this issue. Some are perpetually into the garbage or stealing things from the kitchen counter. Some are chewers–they munch on your house siding, furniture, etc. They shred every toy you buy. Some dig, bark, and demand constant attention. Many of these behaviors are the result of human failure to condition them while it counts. Avoiding behaviors start while the pup is young and continues as they reach teenage behaviors. Freedom is earned — write that on your heart. It might save your Weim’s life and you a lot of frustration.

About OwyheeStar

We are Professional Weimaraner breeders--with forty years experience at raising puppies. For many years, we have focused exclusively on the Weimaraner! If you are considering the Weimaraner, or live with one, we welcome you to sign up to our blog. We sincerely hope you will find the information, the stories, and varied posts insightful (as well as entertaining). To those who live with an OwyheeStar Weimaraner, we send special thanks. We appreciate the photos, the news, and your friendship. Thank you for being a part of the extended OwyheeStar family.

Posted on April 29, 2016, in Behavior & Training, Bringing home the Weimaraner, Children and Weims, Companion Weimaraner, Crate Training, Dangers, Getting an OwyheeStar Puppy, Getting started with a Weim, House Training, Information and Education, OwyheeStar Weim, Owyheestar Weimaraner, OwyheeStar Weimaraner Puppy, OwyheeStar’s Succeeding with the Weimaraner, Puppy Development, Puppy Information, Puppy Tips & Info, Quirks and Quandaries, Separation Anxiety, Socialization, The Weimaraner, Training, Weimaraner puppies and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. He is always a surprise :o) Maybe one of the mistakes we made was to think that a very intelligent dog is easy to train :o) the truth is he trained us :o)

  2. DELIGHTFUL……but they keep you on your toes to stay one step ahead!!!😁

    • Ha ha –so true. When you are on the other side and you read these traits it sounds wonderful. LOL It is; however it is also not what you think.

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